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bushboy

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About bushboy

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  • Birthday 01/01/1952
  1. Hi Julie -I've also had success with hydrated lime but find I need to keep adding it every few days to stop it going acidic again - I wonder if this has something to do with my water "hardness" -a subject I struggle to get my brain around inspite of reading Gary's explanation in his manual I find I need to add 1 level dessert spoon in a bucket of water - this for a 1250l system - this seems to bring the pH up 1 colour reading ( eg 6.8->7.0) - I am pretty cautious adding too much and was interested with your experience of overshoot
  2. hi duggeeeea - I have found rhubarb ( green stemmed variety) does better in AP - previously in the garden soil it has died out over summer here, but so far I have a very healthy looking plant in one of my grow beds - so healthy in fact that I have dug out 3 other plants that were almost deceased and put them into other grow beds in the hope of saving them. We love stewed rhubarb!!
  3. Hi Murray - I used to catch them at Wivenhoe pocket (an area up from Fernvale) -quite a few years ago now though - and they were way too small to bother with then but I wonder if they would do much better in "captivity". If you like I could "force" myself to go up there with a rod and see if they are still there
  4. bushboy

    bunya nut

    update on the bunya nut experience - thanks for the various advice too. I eventually ended up with about 12 bunya cones as there was a tree along the road that had dropped some as well. I piled them up in the sun under cover in my workshed and waited for them to further dry - they look quite green initially. I expected them to open like a normal pine cone but that didn't really happen and today I picked one up and dropped it and it all broke open. That was about 2-3 weeks after initial collection. Now there are heaps and heaps of nuts inside - 1/each leaf on the nut but the majority of the nuts are "empty" - there are only a few really large nuts /cone - I will count next time as I have some left and let you all know. It is quite obvious which are the nuts worth keeping . Cooking - after looking on the Internet the simplest method seems to be to boil the nut for 30mins - we did this tonight - when done you split them and inside is some material that, to me, looks like and tastes like greasy potato. They were quite acceptable to eat like that and I can see how you could then on use them in other dishes. Overall I would recommend them - the nuts are fairly easy to extract and cooking is pretty basic - apparently they can be roasted as well but I haven't tried that and can't comment further Also had grow bed corn tonight -yum - sweet as - and kohl rabi (vegie garden grown)
  5. Hamish - lift (if possible) -firmly clamp 2 pieces of 4x2 hardwood each side of the pipe with a couple of c clamps might work - you could even partly shape the timber to fit the pipe diameter to provide better friction. I have done this before lifting posts from an old carport but not from a bore. Would you be able to fit a polypipe insert instead - galv pipe is such c..p - I suspect your pipe will break off once you start trying to lift it
  6. bushboy

    bunya nut

    Thanks for that info Laurie -what I was looking for I'll report back after I get to eat some ! Cheers
  7. bushboy

    bunya nut

    Hi Annie - no it is not "open" - maybe it fell off whilst still green -I suspect I just leave it to ripen and open itself as one would do with any other green fruit before cooking the seeds. Maybe the aborigines threw them into a fire to cook? It is a nasty thing to pick up with really sharp spines that readily pierce one's skin! I weighed it this am - 5 1/4 lb (old scales = 2.38kg) Have you eaten them before?
  8. great site - thanks Gary
  9. bushboy

    bunya nut

    BIG excitement on the BB property today -found my first bunya nut from a tree I planted about 15yrs ago It is huge - well huge to me not being familiar with wild ones! Photo attached Do I need to wait for it to open to be able to extract the seeds and then how are they prepared?
  10. well done Murray - very articulate and easy to follow
  11. bushboy

    Hamish

    lessons: #1 test water if fish kill occurs #2 beware heavy inflows of storm water such a shame to lose so many almost plate sized fish!
  12. thanks for the name of those panels BB -I was wanting that info I am probably geotechnically impaired but my take is that the soil needs to be in contact with the container to get a thermal effect? Obviously I wouldn't want that due to rusting occurring. Burying the container really isn't any option for this site also. I guess all that I will achieve is the even out the temps by insulating the container May even by a total waste of time and effort actually! My other idea was to purchase some large concrete pipes, lay them horizontally and cover them with earth - I can do that reasonably easily here. Murray - what are you on about for your systems - are you trying to cool the water in summer and warm it in winter? Does your water get too hot?
  13. Hi Aqua Trox and good luck with your project One thing I have done that I want to do more on is compare the sugar content of plants grown in aquaponics versus soil using a brix reading. So far I have had only 1 plant type to compare ( silverbeet/chard) and the reading was less in the ap system compared to soil although the ap silverbeet looked better. I am planning on doing more of this viz - more plant types and also using folar sprays before and after but no time at present You might like to consider this very simple analysis as part of your project -brix meters are cheap on ebay - and I would love to hear of any findings you make so keep us informed
  14. bushboy

    Hamish

    Hi Hamish Did you ever finally decide/work out what killed all your JP prior to the move? Glad you are finally settled in. Your property will always be a "work in progress"
  15. Hi ElfNori and Jack@badflas - love your login names! Americans talk alot of root cellars and I understand the concept. Sinking the container into the ground would create several problems such as rusting, water seepage and drainage that I would rather not visit upon. I am not sure of our average ground temp and can't find it on Google but we do not have frosts here ( well hardly ever and only very light) - we are subtropical like Florida. I agree insulation alone wouldn't be ideal but maybe "good enough" to enable storage of surplus vegetable crops for longer than what I am getting at present. Running water over it isn't an option due to chronic water shortages and restrictions. Straw bales seem to have a really good insulating effect from what I have researched so far.
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