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Showing content with the highest reputation since 11/10/2019 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    ande

    Newbie Questions.

    Hi again Got it, it's a DWC system UVI style built on site. It can be used for either aquaponic or hydroponic so you don't have to use fish to run it. here is a description of what you got https://www.uvi.edu/files/documents/Research_and_Public_Service/WRRI/UVIAquaponicSystem.pdf From the pics it looks like it's nicely built so does the green house. here is some more info https://www.nal.usda.gov/afsic/aquaponics?page=1 https://www.agmrc.org/commodities-products/aquaculture/aquaponics http://factsheets.okstate.edu/documents/srac-5006-economics-of-aquaponics/ I would contact the local agricultural extension office https://extension.wsu.edu have a chat and ask their opinion cheers You might get some pro/con thoughts and ideas by plowing thru this thread
  2. 1 point
    ande

    Newbie Questions.

    Hi Gundog Welcome to APN/HQ To answer your Q's, you have to provide more details/pics type of setup "brand-names" etc.also what part(s) of the system is missing (25%) but I'll try to give a "general" answer. Not hard, if you are dedicated and are genuinely interested, experience and/or basic knowledge in either agri- aqua- culture or both would help. Time intensity will vary with "season". Keeping livestock will tie up some time on a daily basis, no matter how much you automat the system. It could be, however it deepens on numerous factors. The upside for you is the $300.000 invested (if it is put in a "good" system you can use?) You have to figure out how much more you need to invest to get it up and running. The cost of the remaining 25% does not necessary mean another $100.000 it could be more/less, pluss the cost of your own training time and fees? Water budget is the most important part, can you get enough ? any restrictions on supply ? Access to market is vital (distances & demands) ,also what can you grow in your climate? indoors/outdoors/heating/cooling/lighting etc.......? Regulations ? restrictions ? on fish species, supply of fish................. the list is long, there are a few threads on the subject worth reading. https://wsg.washington.edu/wacoast/meetings/June-2016/Handout-Overview of State and Federal Aquaculture Requirements.pdf Short answer to both is yes. No such thing as dumb Q's so don't worry cheers
  3. 1 point
    ande

    Rowan berries

    Hehe I see I got those pictures in a odd sequence I'll add that before proceeding to make the jelly, I did a test run as I'w never made jelly before. The test badge was made of mint picked in the garden, turned out really nice as well and boosted my confidence to make the rowan jelly cheers
  4. 1 point
    ande

    Alkalinity

    Hi Hunterpehrson Welcome to APN/HQ To answer your Q on alkalinity, I find it easier to point you towards a thread/post and a APN article where the complexity are pretty well explained IMO Quote : Here are the most common scenarios you will encounter that require adjustments: Declining pH - Generally speaking, you will want to maintain your cycled system pH around 6.8-7.2. If it falls below this range, the nitrifying bacteria will be adversely impacted. You need to add a base. There are commercially available products for this, but you can also use relatively common chemical salts like sodium bicarbonate, calcium bicarbonate, potassium bicarbonate, calcium hydroxide, calcium chloride and many others. Specific recommendations are beyond the scope of this article, but will be featured in a later article related to maintaining pH levels....................... cut/paste from this article : I recommend you read all the answers in the post and the full article cheers Edit: I'll add this link here as well: cheers
  5. 1 point
    ande

    Lefse

    Hi Toga They keep fresh for about 4-7 days in a sealed plastic bag in the fridge , and OK for another week. So I fold them up further once they have cooled, I then put them in separate plastic bags (my ex stock 4 in each bag, with a papper between to separate ) in the fridge for further cooling, before pressing out air, sealing and freezing to avoid condense. If I freeze for longer storage, I usually vacuum pack. The trick is to thaw completely and slow in the fridge before unpacking this way they taste just like fresh. Back in the old days they would let them hang to dry then wet/moist them again before use a special technique this way they could be stored for +/- 6 months. Then there is also another variation (flat-bread or flattbrød as we say) you use the same recipe/dough, but you roll them much thinner and you finish up with a special roller that pokes tiny holes in it, to vent out all moist whilst backing it. These are baked slow and on low heat, to dry and get crispy. This way gives about double/triple the number, and you usually need some practice to roll them out this thin. These can be stored for years. Usually both variations would be made at the same time. cheers
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