Rahul Sud

Aquaponic System Startup & Inoculating a new system with nitrifying bacteria

5 posts in this topic

@ anyone - Do these parameters hold true 

Inoculate and startup a new aquaponic system

If one just fills the aquaponic system with water and put fish in it, it will start up all by itself. You can’t prevent it from starting up unless you do something really dumb. To start it sooner (so you have vegetables to eat sooner) simply “inoculate” it with some of the nitrifying bacteria that occur naturally in aquaponics water to begin nitrification.

We recommend operating your system with 0.3 pounds of fish per square foot of raft area or media bed. However, we suggest starting your system with 10-20% or so of this recommended operating amount of fish. There are two reasons for this: first, it is difficult and/or expensive to just buy a large amount (by weight) of live fish. Second, until your nitrifying bacteria get well established and numerous, you do not want to inject too much ammonia into your system, which is what “too many fish” will do. Ammonia levels of 3 ppm or over in your water will slow down or stop nitrification (and your system startup) in its tracks, because the nitrifying bacteria in your inoculant are inhibited by too much ammonia, even though it’s their “food”.

Although there are some nitrifying bacteria present in the water itself, these bacteria are primarily “surface colonizers”, which means that they live in colonies on solid surfaces; this is sometimes called a “biofilm”. There is a limited amount of surface area for them to colonize in your brand-new aquaponics system, and as a result, there is a limited amount of bacteria; and a limited amount of nitrification can occur because they can only process a small amount of ammonia. But, as you put baby plants into your system during startup, you are adding a tremendous amount of surface area (the bacteria colonize their roots too!), and as your plants grow and increase their root area, the bacteria colonize them and increase exponentially until there are zillions of them, and they can handle an incredible amount of ammonia.

Hoping to get some positive feedback.

Regards

 

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Hi RS

Yes it holds some truth.

Have a look at this article on cycling

 

Also this threads

 

And this post/comment on iAVs cycling

cheers

Edited by ande (see edit history)

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Best way to get Nitrifying bacteria to grow is use a good compost tea, and Pee.

Same as making Sour Dough bread, it's all in the "Starter" used. Mother nature has done the same since the beginning of time.

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4 hours ago, ande said:

I have no idea as to why the article link won't work ?

i tried to edit it 5-6 times ?

anyhow look it up here http://aquaponicsnation.com/articles.html/articles/frequently-asked-questions/

it's the article named "What is the nitrogen cycle and why is it important to Aquaponics?" by Kellen

cheers

Thank you much appreciated :D..... shall revert........ Soon we are planning to restart a 10000 L fish tank with total 500 sqft grow bed area with NFT, Vertical Towers, DWC and iAV System.................

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