Cecil

Trout eggs are hatching!

55 posts in this topic

I received 3000  brook, brown, and tiger trout last Thursday (on my birthday) and some are now hatching. 

I'm seeing alevins that look like minute fry swimming around with a huge beach balls attached to them. Actually they aren't really swimming around. Just kind of dealing with the beach ball! LOL

I'd love to share pics but can't take the chance of a flash doing anything bad to the alevins eggs.

 

Had a SNAFU with the main RAS they are supposed to be in, and moved them to an egg basket (small laundry basket with the sides and bottom cut out with nylon screen siliconed it their place) into a 55 gallon drum of water which is fed by a 55 gallon drum biofilter, and another 55 gallon drum where the chiller runs water in and out. The chiller keeps temps around 53 to 55 degrees F. Biofilter is working great in the cold water with as of yet no ammonia or nitrite readings. A 2 inch PVC siphon does a great job of keeping everything moving  in a circuit between the three barrels with a small mag drive pump pumping water to the biofilter barrel.

Hope to move the eggs and alevins back to the RAS in a much larger basket soon. 

 

BTW initially I built three egg hatching jars and didn't care for them. It's much easier to pick out the dead eggs and remaining shells in the basket. 

Edited by Cecil (see edit history)
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Hi Cecil

I look really forward to those pics, and hopefully a layout of the hole setup, I might have a go at this, in my outhouse basement.

This is something I did back in the days, with my father/Grandfather, using a hatch box placed in/by the ckreek/river, loaded with self harwested (milked) eggs, from wild(local) brown & sea trout.

Wery cool project you are runing IMO :bow::thumbsu:

 

cheers

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Brook, Brown, and Tiger Trout Alevins. I turned up the lights so the flash wouldn't be so intense and used the wife's I phone camera. Hope I didn't do any damage to the alevin! IMG_1591.JPG

Edited by Cecil (see edit history)
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A laundry basket with pieces cut out and screen siliconed in to hold eggs and alevins. I attached two pieces of a swim noodle on each side to float it. 

egg:alevin basket after installing screen 12:16.jpg

Here is a a larger version floating in the fish tank with the eggs and alevins. I will replace this one with one with larger mesh nylon screen at some point before releasing the fry into the tank. The problem is this fine screen will probably clog with feed, but the tank is too deep at first for the fry to come up for feed initially.  eggs:alevin in floating basket in fish tank12:16.jpg

 

 

 

Edited by Cecil (see edit history)
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The mid-level drain (note it's below the surface water level of the tank.) If you look closely you can see the surface of the tank water is at the 140 gallon mark. The bottom drain comes up and in vertically after the gate valve (see). Most of the flow is coming from the midlevel drain with about 10 percent from the bottom drain. This is easily adjusted with the gate valves. Flow is about 15 gallons per minute. I tried attaching a plastic waste basket or a five gallon bucket to the outside of the fish tank to serve the same purpose, but for some reason failed creating a good seal both with a bulkhead fittings or a Uniseal. Settled for what's in the photo.

midflow to parabolic filter 12:16.jpg

 

This is the termination of the fish tank outflow from both the midlevel exit and the bottom drain where it drops unto the parabolic screen. What doesn't end up in the trough drops through into the biofilter which is a 55 gallon drum, about 4 cubic feet of Allied Aqua plastic media and a mebrance diffuser in the bottom of the biofilter to circulate the media. 

Flow to parabolic screen.jpg

This shows the water dropping onto the parabolic screen. water flow onto parabolic screen 12:16.jpg

Edited by Cecil (see edit history)
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A sump tank that receives water from the top of the biofilter. A mag drive pump in the bottom then pumps water up through the sand filter which dumps back into the fish tank. There a check valve in the 1 inch water line to the bottom of the sand filter to prevent flooding if the pump is shut off. 

sump tank from biofilter 12:16.jpg

This is water from the trough in the parabolic filter that drops through two filter socks and then flows via gravity to the sump tank. 

overflow from parbolic trough 12:16.jpg

Below is the 30 gallon sand filter which is two sizes of rock, gravel, and crush granite chicken grit. Water is up flowed through the top. The back hose attached to a small shop vac for backwashing by covering the outflow and opening the back wash pipe on the side. 

sand filter 12:16.jpg

Edited by Cecil (see edit history)
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Nitrites were at zero today! I put some fish feed in one of the filter socks to hopefully add some phosphate to the system. Either it worked or the timing was coincidental to the phosphate calcium in the baking soda I added. Or the filter just adapted to the two moves and stabilized? 

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Starting to get swim up fry now. I moved about 6 or 8 very gently with a fine screen dip net to an adjacent floating screen basket.

Sprinkled a little fry powder. Will try and feed them up to 8 X per day. Looks like I won't get much ice fishing in this winter! 

Want to separate them from the alevins as I don't want the excess feed settling on the alevins or clogging the screen.  

Edited by Cecil (see edit history)
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Nitrites were at zero this morning! Granted I did a 40 percent water change yesterday afternoon, but when I did that before, I still had nitrites the next morning. I'm cautiously optimistic.

 

I also slowed down the tumbling of the plastic media in the moving bed tank yesterday, started feeding some swim up fry, and stopped adding nitrifying neutralizing compound. Perhaps those were factors?

 

And or the addition of phosporhic acid is a factor?

 

I guess the problem with the shotgun approach to solving a problem is you never know which solution solved the problem or if it was all of the above or some of the above. That said I'm cautiously optimistic and don't care as long as the nitrites stay at zero on the API scale!

Edited by Cecil (see edit history)

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No longer any issues with nitrites. Staying at zero even with increased feeding. Ammonia still at zero and nitrates are negligible. 

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Whoops! Nitrites are still zero but had an ammonia spike to 2 mg/l overnight!  As un-ionized ammonia (NH3) that comes to 0.050 mg.l! For salmonids that should stay under 0.020 mg/l. I think the nitrosomonas has to adapt to my start up of adding feed to the system to the swim up fry, and I need to realize it's much slower at the 12 to 13 C. vs. my other systems that are about 25 C. 

I clean any wasted feed off the bottom of the tank now ASAP (feed goes through the screen of the basket) and I think I was getting carried away on the feeding although swim up fry need to be fed often. 

Getting ready to do another water change. Wish I new how long it takes for the nitrogen gas to evacuate from a 55 gallon drum that was filled with well water. I don't want to take the change of causing gas bubble trauma. 

Edited by Cecil (see edit history)

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Hi Cecil

You should maybe look in to some sort of UVC/O3 unit and/or a slow sandfilter, on the RAS, to handle any TAN spikes, in the future ?

I'm excited to see how things turn out, thanks for reporting :thumbsu:

 

cheers

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Ande,

Yes, considering all the options. I see there is a small scale ozone system available, and I built a 6 foot high fluidized sand filter a while back. but I'd have to run a pump to it and I'm running out of plug ins! There's 1. the plug in for mag drive pump that moves the water in the system, 2. the plug in for the chiller, 3. the plug in for the pump that circulates water through the chiller, and the plug in for the iron filter. Right now I'm just doing some serious water changes each day in hopes the nitrosomonas bacteria adapts to the load. 

I could hook up a flow through (partial recircuatlating system) with less than a gallon per minute  but that creates two problems to solve. 

 

1. What to do with the overflow in the winter. Septic tank can only take so much water. Other alternative is to plumb into the line that is the iron backwash line out to the highway ditch. I worry about freezing but it could work by running the over flow line into it with a check valve to keep the backwash water from backing up to the fish tank. 

2. Water directly out of the well could be supersaturated with nitrogen gas. If so the gas would have to be degassed before it enters the fish tank. Perhaps flow is low enough not to be a concern, or I could drop the water through a small packed column. 

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Here's the latest picture of the trout fry. Most are still hanging close the bottom outside edges but more and more swim up every day. 

 

 

trout fry 1:2:17.jpg

Edited by Cecil (see edit history)
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Finaly some1 that uses trout in ap.

I red fast your posts, from both of You.

Now i realize that FT with cone vottom are best for raising trout (for collecting waste and feed lefovers).

Next, trout req.realy clean, O2 rich water.

Would you recomend some additional filter or even UVC before water is pumped back into FT with trout?

As second, how do You callcuate density for trout, starting that i want to grow 300-400g fish in 3600L tank.

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Addition: now in  Croatia is -8. is it posible to raise trout in such condition in greenhouse or does ft need to be in some solid compaund (heating and cooling of air is included). in summer it can get to 35. what is trout optimal temp and O2 flow for indoor gorw?

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15 hours ago, Valodja said:

Finaly some1 that uses trout in ap.

I red fast your posts, from both of You.

Now i realize that FT with cone vottom are best for raising trout (for collecting waste and feed lefovers).

Next, trout req.realy clean, O2 rich water.

Would you recomend some additional filter or even UVC before water is pumped back into FT with trout?

As second, how do You callcuate density for trout, starting that i want to grow 300-400g fish in 3600L tank.

First of all thank you for your confidence in me but I am new to trout in a recirculating system. So I don't have much experience yet. That said, even though my tank is a cone bottom tank I don't believe it helps as much as people think it does. In fact, some texts even say as much. I've seen waste when raising other fish sit on the decline of the cone just as well as if it's flat. They do help when draining the tank though. 

I'm not a big fan of UV but then even though I have a unit I've never used it. I think it's more important to keep suspended solids low so whatever achieves that end is all good. My last filter before going into the tank, an up flow sand filter below, seems to keep the water very clear, although today I've noticed a slight white haze no doubt due to the increased feeding. 

http://www.koiphen.com/forums/showthread.php?157708-Downsized-version-of-Birdman-s-Sand-and-Gravel-Filter&p=2597579#post2597579

 

As far as density you'll have to look that up. But with my warm water fish I will not go above 1/2 pound per gallon without pumping in pure oxygen. May be less for coldwater fish. 

And keep in mind my fish are not food fish and are reared for a small niche market. My trout will go out side into a flow through earthen pond at low densities to produce wild looking fish with intact fins. 

 

Edited by Cecil (see edit history)

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