13jason

Striped Bass Dying

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My teacher ordered around 100 striped bass in a large recirculating tank. A few days after they arrived, maybe a week or so, they started dying. So far they we have got maybe 10-15 fish left. We can't seem to figure out what is happening. Please help. We aren't sure if they're sick, or what is going on. Need help asap.

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Most likely "new tank syndrome".   Do you have any water quality measurements?

Most important would be:  Ammonia, pH, temperature, and O2 if it is available.  

A description of the system would be helpful too.  How many gallons or liters the tank, what kind and size of biofilter, and how often the tank is turned over?

How long was the system cycling prior to adding fish?

Any metal exposed in the water other than stainless steel or titanium?

The main culprits typically are ammonia too high or oxygen too low.

Old Prospector likes this

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It is a 250 gallon tank and water has been circulated for about 5 days. My teacher says the Ammonia might have been to high.

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yes , ammonia might have been too high. Especially if the tank was not cycled (biologically mature) before adding that many fish.

 

 Your teacher should invest in basic test kits for PH, ammonia and nitrite so you could say for sure. 

 

 

 

ande likes this

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Yeah like Brian says if they tank was not cycled before you got the fish, they were destined to die. Your teacher might as well have flushed them down the toilet. I'm sure the remaining ones will die too, or at best have compromised gills from the burning of the ammonia. And nitrites are a killer too. Ammonia isn't your only killer. You also started on a species that is more difficult than others. 

If your teacher truly didn't understand the importance of cycling, he or she really needs to bone up on the importance of nitrification to eliminate ammonia and nitrites. Here's a good read, and although it's geared to aquariums it also applies to recirculating systems and aquaponics. 

http://www.bioconlabs.com/nitribactfacts.html

 

Edited by Cecil (see edit history)

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