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This subject came up in talking about carbon and if it would be beneficial to add to AP systems as in composting or mineralization tanks. I had not heard of the molecule before and it turns out it was recently discovered about 10 years ago. 

https://agresearchmag.ars.usda.gov/2002/sep/soil

 

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1 hour ago, Ravnis said:

This subject came up in talking about carbon and if it would be beneficial to add to AP systems as in composting or mineralization tanks. I had not heard of the molecule before and it turns out it was recently discovered about 10 years ago. 

https://agresearchmag.ars.usda.gov/2002/sep/soil

 

Well it won't be long till the schemers will get ahold of this and everybody will be looking at this as the magic cure all.

I, remember back in the 60's when a grower saw the white hyphae of mycorrhizal fungi growing inside a potted plant, they would throw the plant away thinking it was a crown or root rot forming.  Now, Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, found living on plant roots around the world, appear to be the only producers of glomalin.

Not so long ago, soil scientists with PHD's from the major schools went to S. America to study,  Preta, the magical soil that is suppose to out produce any soils in the world. Even one of these great scientists, was told by a local that the pits he excavated 10-20 years ago in the past, has actually reproduced themselves with new preta. But before you disbelieve this, the same PHD soil scientist actually came back home and wrote a paper and stated the same in his paper. 

So now you have Bio-Char

And the schemers have been working on the Bio-Char blankets flying around the upper atmosphere collecting carbon, or the Bio-Char tree stuctures planted all over that are 1,000's of feet high collecting carbon from the winds.

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2 hours ago, Ravnis said:

This subject came up in talking about carbon and if it would be beneficial to add to AP systems as in composting or mineralization tanks. I had not heard of the molecule before and it turns out it was recently discovered about 10 years ago.

I think you are missing the context of this Ravnis.

To get large amounts of Glomalin you need to cultivate the Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi that makes it, on the roots of the plants, in the growing medium, in situ. That involves meeting a few (5) basic criteria in the growing system. I think its doable, but you need to be prepared for some rather large dents in your pride, going down this rabbit hole pretty much smashes every conventional preconception/idea on how soil works, and plants and nutrient cycling for that matter.

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Good to see this thread live, Ravnis.

To add on to this discussion.. as per their report, glomalin molecule is a clump of small glycoproteins with iron and other ions attached.  The glomalin researchers also found that it contains from 1 to 9 percent tightly bound iron.  Perhaps this is one of the reasons we never had a single event of iron deficiency in plants grown in our iAVs sand culture systems.

Edited by vkn (see edit history)

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14 hours ago, yahoo2 said:

To get large amounts of Glomalin you need to cultivate (?) the Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi that makes it, on the roots of the plants, in the growing medium, in situ. That involves meeting a few (5) basic criteria in the growing system. I think its doable,

Interesting.. can you elaborate your viewpoint a bit?

Edited by vkn (see edit history)

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Sorry Rav, I was using YOU as in " all the people involved in the conversation", I dont see glomalin as a product that can be added, it is grown in the soil as part of a process, the researchers describe its function as a sticky string bag that turns into a waxy bag over time, this makes soil very granular, so you have billions of tough little packages that resist things like nutrient leeching, water logging, etc .  I have dug up an illustration of the process of getting an arbuscular fungi to join with a plants hair root.  This is step one in forming Glomalin.

And here is essentially the problem, the plant has got to want this to happen (as a seedling) and exude a compound that attracts the spores hyphae to it. The population of spores then multiply with the plants growth and trade nutrients for complex sugars through the plants life. Step two in forming glomalin.

If we miss that window because the conditions are not right, perhaps we are overstimulating the seedlings with mineralised nutrients or we are killing the spores, we  never start building the fungal population early enough in the plants life to reach a critical mass. Or perhaps the conditions mean that the soil is dominated by opportunist bacteria rather than fungi. it is all about creating the right environment to make it happen.

I am finding it incredibly difficult to get it right.

Unfortunately I have to sneak off and do some work, living in a communications black hole means i have to leave this there till I get back. cheers

ncomms1046-f4.jpg

Edited by yahoo2
forgetfullness (see edit history)

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