Krantz

Trouts dying. pH ok. EC Ok. Food Ok. I don´t know what else to do.

37 posts in this topic

in my experience it is more likely that this is a " the last straw that broke the camels back" situation. I am only saying that because where livestock is concerned it is rare for just one thing to kill something. They are usually already struggling from other issues.

 

where are the fish waste solids? if you are not removing them and they are not in the bottom of the fish tank, they must be somewhere in the system. I guess it will be in the growbeds or the bottom of the raft tank and some of the churned up  fines could be hanging in the water column.

 

some sludge or a dead fish laying in a pipe wont do the fish any favours.

Actually, fish waste is properly collected form the bottom of the fishtanks into the filters, from there all the waste goes down and gets iin the mineralization tanks where it bubbles for quite some time before going back to the main system...

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I don't know everything but I've learned a lot . That was just my opinion because I've raised goldfish and carp before. I am now associated with Aiken organic Aiken aquaponics outlander Aiken bait and tackle Aiken aquarium and tropical fish stores in Augusta I also sell products too. Not to mention my property that's 75% aggrriculture and we even grow no gmo and sell to 3 vegi stands. I don't understand why my advice and opinions are not as important I even took 4 years horticulture. I even do landscaping and construction. ☹ï¸

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He said he has swirl filter and what im guessing is a mineralization tank. I really don't see anything wrong with that setup, if I'm understanding correctly.

A couple of things comes to my mind to check on.

You reported ammonia level and I would expect 0 if cycled. Are you checking in multiple places and depths of your Ibc tanks? Is possible a flow problem is leaving a high zone of ammonia near the bottom. Bit a few people in the past.

Also with copper being toxic to fish the brass fitting might possibly be a source of copper under certain conditions. A test for copper and zinc levels should help you know if it's an issue or not.

Edited by Ravnis (see edit history)
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Oh yes, I did miss it, sorry about that,

 

200 litre swirl seperators going to mineralisation tanks on each system should be OK. I think radial flow sperators are better, but to save any distraction and confussion, I'd stick with the swirl seperators you have, as they should be fine . You may like to try the radial flow separators later when things settle down. 

 

Cheers.

Edited by bigdaddy (see edit history)
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And Do you have any other type of filtration apart from your grow beds with your system? No, no other filtration, only the grow beds.

 

 

 

 

Apologies, i read this and must have skipped over your reply after this that mentioned the separator.

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Hi Yahoo,

I did the same...

 

Hi Krantz,

How are your trout now you've taken your toxic plants out?

Just one thing on that...As Gary was saying, I'd still replace them with other plants to help with nitrates control later on.

 

Cheers

Edited by bigdaddy (see edit history)
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Hi Krantz,

 

My money is still on sub-lethal levels of dissolved oxygen.  Back in the good old days, when I was trying to persuade people to use dedicated filtration, I used to speak of a "convergence of events."  In your situation, the convergence of events includes:

  • 17oC or warmer - the DO levels are just staying adequte.
  • the early of hours in the morning (when DO levels are at their lowest),
  • dirty filters - consuming oxygen

.......and you have the makings of a fish kill.

 

The clue, I believe, is in the fact that your fish perish during the night.

 

I'd suggest that you cut back on the food, clean your filters and disconnect the mineralisation tank (inline mineralisation systems are oxygen thieves).

 

Gary

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Hi Krantz

I think I missed something...

Filters?...What filters?...Where?

Cheers.

These.

post-4647-0-71349100-1463968590_thumb.jp

post-4647-0-06145300-1463968596_thumb.jp

post-4647-0-46326600-1463968606_thumb.jp

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Hi Yahoo,

I did the same...

 

Hi Krantz,

How are your trout now you've taken your toxic plants out?

Just one thing on that...As Gary was saying, I'd still replace them with other plants to help with nitrates control later on.

 

Cheers

I will try to bring them back to the system slowly during this week; I already removed the presumed toxic plants.

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I will try to bring them back to the system slowly during this week; I already removed the presumed toxic plants.

I wouldn't put the fish back in just yet. It's not going to be a case of rip the plants out and its gone. (assuming this is what it is, I still favor gary's theory of periods of low oxygen from sediment.)

 

all of the products that are produced from these plants are listed as category 2 /chronic toxicity code H411

 

what that means is that they are listed as chronically toxic to fish in the 1ppm to 10 ppm range and they dont biodegrade easily over time, that means they can accumulate in the water. The only way to reduce the levels in the tank is with a series of water changes over time. perhaps the water changes could be a 50/50 mix of fresh water and water from the other tank.

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Hi Krantz,

 

My money is still on sub-lethal levels of dissolved oxygen.  Back in the good old days, when I was trying to persuade people to use dedicated filtration, I used to speak of a "convergence of events."  In your situation, the convergence of events includes:

  • 17oC or warmer - the DO levels are just staying adequte.
  • the early of hours in the morning (when DO levels are at their lowest),
  • dirty filters - consuming oxygen

.......and you have the makings of a fish kill.

 

The clue, I believe, is in the fact that your fish perish during the night.

 

I'd suggest that you cut back on the food, clean your filters and disconnect the mineralisation tank (inline mineralisation systems are oxygen thieves).

 

Gary

 

Hi everyone, 

This is a little different but still worth talking about I think...And it's oxygen related...I lost a whole batch of more than 60 trout overnight, when I went on holidays and left my system in another person's keen to help but inexperienced hands...I lost my aeration overnight and bang... I was fishing dead trout out of my fish tanks when I got back. I hate losing just 1 fish let alone a batch of them. Trout need  good amounts of oxygen, not only by having pleenty of aeration but anything which will steal the oxygen away needs to be eliminated or minimised as much as possible from your system..

 

Cheers.

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