Axolotlponics

Axolotl salamanders in Montana

11 posts in this topic

Greetings!

 

I'm new to aquaponics and so figured it would be a good idea to join a forum and get connected with people more experienced than I. 

 

As you may have guessed, I'm experimenting with a small scale aquaponics system using axolotl salamanders instead of fish. I have limited space where I live and quite honestly, I don't like the taste of freshwater fish anyway. Also, I believe there are some advantages of using axolotls instead. I just got my 3 axolotl babies today so hopefully getting everything going in the next few days.

 

I plan to document my experience with this experiment and if there's an interest, would be glad to start a thread about it. 

 

Also, anyone on here from SW Montana, I'd love to setup a time to come see your system and learn some tips. 

 

Thanks

 

 

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Salamanders are very interesting. I currently raise two kinds but locally theirs atleast half dozen kinds. Some rarely get in water just stay in moist dark spots. I've seen two larger kinds away from

Water one was orange with black spots. The other was black with yellow spots.guessing there could be difficult terminology for salamander types such as newt or mudpuppy. Ones I raise live in atleast foot of water and have noticeable gills. Wonder if you are using salamander if it would also be ok to use shrimp crawfish or even snails . Maybe even combination of small aquatic plants fish and variety of aquatic life in AP would be more benifcal than just one alone. Who knows 😀

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Hard to say what kind of salamander you're seeing without a picture. Black with yellow spots, I would guess a tiger salamander just because they seem to be to most common in the country. 

 

Axolotl's are actually a kind of neotenic tiger salamander, so they never leave the juvenile state. Interestingly though, they develop lungs as well as retaining their gills. They're pretty hardy and active, mine are already eating worms from my fingers. The also like cooler water and don't need a light source. 

 

It would be interesting to experiment with other critters in an aquaponics system. I had a 150 gallon koi tank in the past with some blue crawfish living in the rocks below, they seemed helpful in cleaning up uneaten food and breaking apart large chunks of waste. I've also heard of people using apple snails alone in an aquaponics system with good results however i have no experience with that.

 

I'm starting small (only 4 plants) with the axolotls and if the results are good, I'll expand. 

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Nice 4 plants system sounds like make easy display pictures. In one 50 gallon we combined fish crawfish shrimp salamander. Water sprites algae and snails also live in tank. Beach sand mountain river rock combo for gravel base this system currently isn't attached to AP system. I do however could possibly but maybe if you are successful with small system I will try one. 😀

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There is a risk of salmonella, related to amfibians in food  production, just so you know

 

There are more risks related to using any animals raw feces in any type of food production.

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Yes there are risks of salmonella, e. coli, etc. in amphibians waste. I know there is also a risk of those harmful bacteria from fish but which animal is at a higher risk I have no idea. I bought a bacterial water testing kit which is actually meant for pools but should work fine for me, figure I'll test the water once a month. 

 

I was also going to do some research on using UV light to kill harmful bacteria, downside would be if it killed the beneficial bacteria too. Have you seen the UV light water bottles? Something like that, I'd run the water through a clear hose under the UV source. But again, if it kills ALL bacteria then it's not a good solution. 

 

Additionally, salmonella is an anerobic bacteria that grows from redox reactions within the organic material. How? No idea, but I do know that some anerobic bacteria can be killed by atmospheric levels of O2, ~ 30%.

 

I'll do more research and post anything helpful I find, there's gotta be a way to isolate and/or kill the harmful stuff. I might go talk to the environmental engineering guys at my school.   

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I'll do more research and post anything helpful I find, there's gotta be a way to isolate and/or kill the harmful stuff. I might go talk to the environmental engineering guys at my school.

 

I would place the UV light before the SB, that way the effluent is cleaned of any bacteria before it gets to the nitrifying bacteria occupying the SB's.

 

To get better results use a in-line UV light filter that way the effluent passes over and around more surface area of the light.

Edited by Old Prospector (see edit history)

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Are you trying to tell me the same fish salamander ect used to help the plants grow can also cause harmful bacteria. How would you go about being 100% organic in AP systems? Seems if u use uv lights isn't that causing growing material to be non organic. Guess simi organic solutions may be better in hp mp or AP systems but this would reduce to total profit if commercialized? Seem all organic may be best on smaller system if organic can be ran on new normal uv.😀

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How would you go about being 100% organic in AP systems?

 

Using UV lights will have nothing to do weather its 100% Organic. 

 

Its just another in-line process to insure 100% purity of the organic effluent.

 

You wouldn't buy a Organic product, that hasn't been rid of any harmful bacteria's in the first place, or maybe you would.

 

Besides everything else that you use in the process used for growing 100% Organic, such as the PVC pipes, pumps, HDPE tanks, etc. are they made from 100% Organic products. No there not, But your using them anyways.

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Nice to know that AP systems and other similar ones aren't counterproductive towards production of organic products. Even nicer to know that uv can be helpful in reducing bacteria and has little or nothing to do with effecting 100% organic material that may be used. This information is useful thanks😀 If something certified organic is grown raised ect in a all natural systems does the value go up or terminology changed at all?

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