GaryD

30 Projects in 30 Weeks

85 posts in this topic

Was disappointed when you never posted anything about your trip, especially with regards to Dr. Oliver, and the "translating his 2015 document".

I have tried to put some of it into a western context and it lacks practical examples. it really needs to grow as we are doing it.

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Hi,

 

I've finally completed the Project #1 - Bucket Test Presentation but, due to our 3rd World Internet connectivity, I'm unable to upload it to the iAVs site.  Hopefully, I'll be able to resolve that problem tomorrow.

 

Project #3 - Front Yard Pergola is well underway.....and will be largely completed today.  I've decided to add more timber to the structure and I hope to acquire that in the next week or two.   This project has provided a lesson in how (and how not) to deal with contractors....but it still promises to be everything we hoped for.

 

I have pretty much everything I need.....except fish......for Project #2 - Desktop iAVs System so that's achievable, too.

 

I'm still confident that, by the end of Week 3, we will (notwithstanding the dramas) have completed the first three projects.

 

Old Prospector, I will endeavour....this week.....to put a brief report together on my meeting with Paul Olivier.

 

 

Gary

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Edited by Gary Donaldson (see edit history)
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Hi,

 

I finally posted the "5-Gallon Bucket Test" article (Project #1)this morning.  It wasn't in the format that I wanted but, so it seems, I've more to learn about the program that I used to put it together.  It and Wordpress don't play nicely together.  Anyway, rather than delay the bucket test thing any longer, I re-formatted it and it's now available.  I'll re-jig it when I've overcome my IT dyslexia.

 

Project #3 - the Front Yard Pergola has also been built and painted.   I decided, after the construction had started, to put more timber into it - and that will happen in the next week or so.  More photos to come.

 

Project #2 - Demo iAVs System is also underway and will be completed in the coming days.

 

The landscape around the 30 Projects program changes so quickly that I'm only going to announce future projects in clusters of three at at time.

 

Gary

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Demo Ivas will be small and basic? Seems these projects you are doing with be combined into some sort of AP permaculture system. Really interested once you get closer to the end of projects 😀

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Demo Ivas will be small and basic? Seems these projects you are doing with be combined into some sort of AP permaculture system. Really interested once you get closer to the end of projects

 

 

Yes, it will be very small......with a total sand capacity of around 100 litres (100kg).  

 

As I indicated in a previous post, all of the 30 Projects have a common connection to my various 'micro' interests.

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Hi Gary

Yes, it will be very small......with a total sand capacity of around 100 litres (100kg).  

 

.

Warning Warning 100 litres drysand sand is 160kg

 quote from here: http://www.aqua-calc.com/calculate/volume-to-weight

 

Volume:
(e.g. iron, iron*, *ine, or * for all items)

precision:

Formulas | Reference | W2V | V2W | Density

show all units

weight
w = Ϡ× v carat 801 000 ounce 5 650.89 gram 160 200 pound 353.18 kilogram 160.2 tonne 0.16 milligram 160 200 000  

 

 

cheers

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Hi Ande,

 

Sorry 'bout the typo.....I meant to say 140kg.

 

I have seven bags - each weighing 20kg = 140kg.

 

I reckoned that to be around 100 litres in volume.

 

It may be a bit less from what you're saying.

 

Thanks for drawing attention to the error.

 

 

Gary

Edited by Gary Donaldson (see edit history)

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What human object is manufactured without contact with any plastics and metals?

 

And no, I don't post the answer till later.

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What human object is manufactured without contact with any plastics and metals?

Won't attempt to guess what's on your mind, nor how you'd define 'object' or 'manufactured' ...

But off the top of my head leaps: fairy tales, feces, hair, religion, urine, vomit ...

Edited by Mark McMurtry (see edit history)

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Hi,

 

Yesterday was the end of the third week of my "30 Projects" program.  I'll report more on that later today.....when I have access to the photos.

 

The projects for the coming three weeks include:

  • Project #4 - iMovie/YouTube - this project is about learning how to make a simple movie that can be uploaded to our upcoming YouTube Channel.  The subject of the first movie will be a how-to on the iAVs demo system that I assembled on Saturday.  This is part of our ongoing communications strategy for iAVs.....and my other interests.
  • Project #5 - Trellis System - I have quite a few metres of a thing called C-System (lengths of steel angle with holes at 50mm intervals) that I want to use as trellising for a variety of plants.  Since it's assembled using nuts and bolts, it is demountable - and able to be recycled ad infinitum.  This project will stand for at the least the coming year or so......enabling us to grow all manner of climbing plants.
  • Project #6 - microFish Farm 2.0 - this is a recirculating aquaculture system that I designed several years ago.  I had a similar design at Bundamba (before we moved to Macleay Island).  I'm putting it together so that I can house fish for my upcoming iAVs projects.  It's now so late in the season that getting fish may be a problem.  If I can't get the fish, I'll select another project.

The first three weeks/projects have convinced me (for as much as it was necessary) that that Irish bastard Murphy (of Murphy's Law fame) is ever present - always looking to upset the apple cart - so projects and their delivery timeframes will be tested and subject to change.  

 

Anyway, we'll see how this 3-week round goes.

 

Gary

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 It's now so late in the season that getting fish may be a problem.  If I can't get the fish, I'll select another project.

 

So exactly how many fish do you need for this small iAVs system?

 

What type, and size of fish are you wanting?

 

How much do the fish cost you, in AU?

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OK.....time to report on the first three projects.

 

Project #1 - The iAVs Bucket Tests - completed and now available.....HERE.  I'm still working on turning this article into a structured presentation.

 

Project #2 - The Front Yard Pergola - completed and photo below.  I've decided to add more timber cross beams to the pergola and to attach reinforcing mesh to the top - to support vine crops.

 

Project #3 - The Demo iAVs System - completed and now undergoing some testing and tuning - photo below.  I'll start another thread to discuss this system.

 

 

Gary

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Do you have help with the construction of these larger projects? Just clearing foundation by myself is hard labor and time consuming. I'm 27 so guess by the time I'm 40 my 100 plus acres should be of pace for larger scale self sufficient food production. Wish I could speed things up even with heavy machinery we are currently adding 6 more plots and taking weeks to finish.

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I engaged a carpenter to build the pergola.  While such a simple structure is within my capabilities, it's more time-effective to pay someone else to do it.  I have bought and transported the extra timber that will used on the project.....and I'll add it to the existing structure.

 

Some of these projects will be done by myself, some will be done by others and some are just a question of throwing money at it.  I work full-time (and the trip to and from work adds another two hours per day....so I'm time poor.  The upside of working, however, is that I earn the money to pay for the work to be done.

 

The important thing, for me, is to get all 30 of the projects sorted by mid to late October.

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I built a pergola just recently as well, but I did it myself.  It's really at least a 2 person job, so mine isn't quite straight.  My wife is building the fence, and what's going to happen is this:  It's going to look so good, it's going to make the stupid pergola look like total garbage, so now I am going to have to sort of re do it to make it look decent enough.

 

I don't know how I ever grew anything in the summer here without this thing......

 

Did you build yours for shade, looks, plants....all three?

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I built a pergola just recently as well, but I did it myself.  It's really at least a 2 person job, so mine isn't quite straight.  My wife is building the fence, and what's going to happen is this:  It's going to look so good, it's going to make the stupid pergola look like total garbage, so now I am going to have to sort of re do it to make it look decent enough.

 

I don't know how I ever grew anything in the summer here without this thing......

 

Did you build yours for shade, looks, plants....all three?

 

If I'm totally honest, part of my decision to engage a carpenter was that it would be done in a craftman-like manner.

 

My reasons for building the pergola included:

  • Structure to support vines and climbing plants
  • Passive climate control - to prevent the afternoon sun from shining directly on the front of the house.
  • Expansion of the living area around the house - traditonal Japanese house design blurs the notion of inside and outside to allow living in close proximity to nature.  The space underneath the pergola will be where we'll entertain visitors when the weather is nice.

As near as possible, we try to apply the Permaculture principle of everything having many uses.

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Hi,

 

Project #4 was intially about learning enough about iMovie to make a short multimedia presentation about the the new iAVs Demo Systems.  It also includes learning enough about YouTube to be able to create an iAVs YouTube channel..  

 

I'm making useful progress with this.....but I've alson expanded the project to include an iAVs Facebook page and an iAVS Facebook group..  The Facebook tasks are pretty much done......we're just putting the finishing touches to our Facebook presence and then we'll post some links.

 

I'm also transitioning our web site from its current Wordpress blog site to something that I hope will address the suggestion that the information is too hard to find.  

 

Project #4 will be completed by 8th May 2016......along Projects #5 amd #6.

 

There's been a good development on the fish front.  It seems that I can source some Jade Perch after all.....so Project #6 - microFish Farm 2.0 is back on the board.....not to mention that I'll also have fish for Project #2 - iAVs Demo System.....which is currently still undergoing some fine-tuning.

 

 I mentioned in recent posts, that I had (after the initial project was scoped) decided to add more joists into Project #3 - Front Yard Pergola.  That has now happened and the structure is all the better for it.

 

I'm increasingly of the view that, for my purposes, the optimum project cycle is probably about a month.  A week is too short.....particularly if the project involves other people.  When I get to the end of Week 6, I'll move to a 4 Projects per 4 Weeks.  While this still averages one project per week, I'll actually hand up 4 projects at the end of each four week period.

 

Gary

Edited by Gary Donaldson (see edit history)
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Projects 13 and 15 how do they work exactly?something hard to do or make?

 

 

The rocket stove is something that must be built and somehow integrated into our backyard farming system.....for the purposes of providing us with hot water.  Ideally, biochar would be a by-product of the rocket stove....but, whether it is or not, its production and use would be another thing that is to be integrated into our system.  Neither of them is, of themselves, difficult to do or make but to do them together in the way that will best suit us probably requires some thought.

 

The order in which the projects appear in the list changes according to our needs and preferences....and the availability of people and resources.

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What would rocketstoves heat used for. The biochar byproduct what is it uses? How exactly are you turning stuff into biochar?

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In our situation, the rocket stove heat would be used for space heating and/or water heating.  It can also be used for cooking obviously.

 

The byproduct of the correct type of rocket stove is biochar.  Biochar is a potent soil ammendment.  

 

The fuel for rocket stoves can come from many sources including: wood, sticks, bamboo, rice hulls (and most other cereal husks) and even some grasses (e.g....vetiver).

 

If you Google any of these things, you'll find loads of information.

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In our situation, the rocket stove heat would be used for space heating and/or water heating.  

 

I, remember back in 1970 when I went on R&R to Sydney, how the weather was in March. And then reading were you want to use it for Space heating. So looking on Google for weather in your area,

 

January is the hottest month in Brisbane with an average temperature of 26°C (78°F) and the coldest is July at 15°C (59°F).
 
Now if you were say in Montana.
 
Over the course of a year, the temperature typically varies from 7°F to 85°F and is rarely below -13°F or above 94°F.  The warm season lasts from June 18 to September 9 with an average daily high temperature above 74°F. The hottest day of the year is July 28, with an average high of 85°F and low of 51°F. The cold season lasts from November 17 to March 1 with an average daily high temperature below 39°F. The coldest day of the year is December 28, with an average low of 7°F and high of 28°F.

 

It can also be used for cooking obviously.

 Your wife should answer this, I can just see you trying to convince her to using a rocket stove to cook with.

 

 

The byproduct of the correct type of rocket stove is biochar.  

 

for space heating and/or water heating expect to get very little to none biochar.

As for cooking yes you can if you can cut all oxygen from the stove, easier said than done.

 

Biochar is a potent soil amendment.

 

If it has been inoculated first, but by itself it’s just charcoal. If you need small amounts just buy “Lump Charcoal†used for BBQ.  

 

The fuel for rocket stoves can come from many sources including: wood, sticks, bamboo, rice hulls (and most other cereal husks) and even some grasses (e.g....vetiver).

 

wood, sticks, great way to reduce your yard waste.

 

bamboo, just make sure the culms are split, otherwise expect some small explosions when burning.

 

rice hulls, other cereal husks, even some grasses (e.g....vetiver). If these are in pellet form they are ok, but by themselves expect them to burn faster than you can feed the fire.

 

 

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The byproduct of the correct type of rocket stove is biochar.  Biochar is a potent soil ammendment.

 

If you are going to be using a Rocket heater to make Biochar, then you are on the right road.

 

Look up "Adam Retort" Great way to make lots of Biochar, We built a similar design using a old Stainless steel retort kiln from a military base.

 

48" diameter, by 72" length, of course we had to fashion a lockable end, it laid on its side approx. 24" above the ground. The rockets heated the retort quite nicely until the Syngas was rerouted to the underside of the retort. Then the rockets were reduced back, just enough to keep the Syngas ignited.

 

You can do the same with a 55 gal steel drum with a ringed locking top. Just make sure it's steel not the thin sheetmetal drums. You'll also want to purchase some steel I-Beam clamps for using instead of the ring. 6' of 2" pipe with 3 90o elbows.

 

Now for the enclosure, you can use dry stacked CMU blocks, or what we did was build a fire brick enclosure.

 

The only big drawback is replacing the steel drum every so often, unless you fabricate a fire shield for the bottom of the drum out of stainless steel.

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