MikeRich

Mosquito fish

37 posts in this topic

Does anyone use these fish in there systems and to what benefits . I do use them for many things just interested if anyone else was

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I did not mean to post on edible plant section lol however I find an increase of plant growth in natural systems wherever mosquito fish are present. Any questions I can answer about them just be careful with terminology I'm not the brightest of lights lol 😀

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Mosquito Fish are regarded as a pest species in Australia.  They apparently don't even live up to their name in mosquito catching department.

 

If I was able to net them in large numbers, I'd be happy to have them as food for my micro-livestock but breeding them would not be acceptable here.

Edited by Gary Donaldson (see edit history)

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The are basically native in my area and places that they are not found in my area I noticed lacks bio diversity and where I've placed them I noticed increase in all other life plants and animals. Compared to bettas in natural environment have higher survival rate and decrease mosquito larva better. That's something I did tests with as a hobby when I was in 8th grade.i still use both today for different parts of my aquaculture study's .

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I've considered breeding them for fish food.  I'm not sure if it's an economical decision to do so, and it would be adding another complexity level....I had considered it though.  You can catch them in a ditch, or in almost any pond here.

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Mosquito fish breed faster than almost any fish. Just one and its offspring in years time will make 1000s and creates endless source of food for lots of things even plant fertilizer. They are great with pest control even killing unwanted insects larvae and keeping plants in the system healthier. Much more too

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I keep some mosquito fish in my open water tanks to take care of.. the musquito larvae. Works good, and native australian fish can't handle the high water temp I have sometimes in there. BTW if you live in Victoria; virtually every freshwater body has these fish, easy to net and good bait for catching redfin. btw better not feed these to your fish as this comes with a risk of introducing parasites or other problems.

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I use these guys for fertilizer and pest control mainly.this fishes family has the ability to adapt easier to systems better than other fish because they can change up to 20 percent of their genes in one generation. Also can live in conditions that would kill Talpia quick and way smaller areas.

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I keep some mosquito fish in my open water tanks to take care of.. the musquito larvae. 

 

That's interesting, Phri......I was under the impression that they hadn't performed well in Australia in that respect. 

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That's interesting, Phri......I was under the impression that they hadn't performed well in Australia in that respect. 

Actually I tried a number of fish species to keep musquito larvae out of my unscreened water tanks. Murray cod fingerlings, silver perch, yellow bellies and australian bass. They all love musquito larvae and will control those but struckle with the temperature swings we have here sometimes (like 1 week 40 degree +)

Musquito fish in a natural water body might preffer other food and thus don't control musquito's well. The other thing is the status of pest species (introduced) which is in my view a bit ad random: carp = pest, redfin = becoming a pest, trout = great (for how long??), tilapia = pest (best aquaculture species) etc

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Pest species in my area replace local life. My eyes mosquito fish don't fit as harmful for anything especially because of its wide range diet doesn't tend to over eat anything. Pest control I place a high ratio per larvae for week and remove most of the fish problem solved they even will take out dragonfly larvae. Age of mosquito fish affect diet much like Talpia. I've seen them eat bread dead ducks almost anything they help breakdown most waste. Always wanted to cross my mosquito fish with guppies to gt larger variety.

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I use white cloud minnows for mozzy wriggler control in my open ponds.  They work well and don't eat the frog spawn either.  Think they are good up to 32 degs.

Edited by mattyoga (see edit history)

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Hi MR

I did not mean to post on edible plant section lol however I find an increase of plant growth in natural systems wherever mosquito fish are present. Any questions I can answer about them just be careful with terminology I'm not the brightest of lights lol

I moved it to the propper section :sword:

 

cheers

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I don't have any experience with Mosquito Fish, but I've used Fathead Minnows with great success in the past (in ponds, not aquaponics). They're very hardy and tolerate a wide range of temperatures. They'll eat all the mosquito larvae they can find. They reproduce like crazy - they like to spawn on the underside of wooden objects if you want to speed things up. They're slow and easy to catch so they make great feeder fish. Almost any fish farm (around here anyway) has them and they're dirt cheap.

 

Any time I have to leave an open water tank out for more than a day or two I'll trap a couple of fatheads from my pond and throw them in there for mosquito control. 

 

I'm just getting started with aquaponics, but I'm considering putting a few fatheads in my sump tank to control mosquitoes. If (when) they overbreed the tank I'll just net and throw the extras into my fish tank as supplemental feed.

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I also raise flathead I'm assuming flatheads are commonly called shinners and roseyreds. Maybe shinners aren't but I know roseyreds are. I raise shinners roseyreds and dace always wondered how or if the were related.

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FAThead minnows, not to be confused with FLATheat catfish! :)

There are two varieties: the normal ones and the Rosy Reds. The only difference is the coloration. I haven't heard them called shiners before but they could very well be the same thing.

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I believe you are correct shinners probably not related. Found commonly in baitstores . Dace found schooling in local rivers . All very similar to flatheads but not the same.

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Seems now more than ever the importance of a natural way to control mosquitos is needed because of new viruses. Flooding warm temperatures frequent rains ect we need to gather data on different species. My test on bettas shows 2.5-5 month old bettas aggressively targeting and eating larvae. Mosquito fish seem to be the most adaptable and consistent at removing them especially when mosquito larvae are dominant in an area. Most aquatic life will eat them at some point of their lifespan. Dragonfly are big mosquito killers too.

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To continue research and development on natural mosquito control I am looking for a field team and sponsorship. This being said I am willing to recruit anyone available from this site. Plan is to collect data for this and later other data concerning environmental problems climate and food production. With our collective data with could put some methods practices products ect in place. We could advance aquacultural studies and make world better place with future success.

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To continue research and development on natural mosquito control I am looking for a field team and sponsorship. This being said I am willing to recruit anyone available from this site. Plan is to collect data for this and later other data concerning environmental problems climate and food production. With our collective data with could put some methods practices products ect in place. We could advance aquacultural studies and make world better place with future success.

 

Mike,

 

With respect, most of the mosquitoes that threaten human health probably grow in places that have no predators.....like rainfall pools and unintentional habitats in and around settled areas.

 

I live on an island and, at this time of the year, our place is awash with mosquitoes.  They breed up among the mangroves in such hordes that no amount of mosquito fish (or their marine equivalent) are going to dent their numbers much.

 

Gary

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That is true. I was more concerned about the recent flooding in the Americas and the outbreak of Zika virus. They are claiming now a plague of mosquitos and other insects could arise from the flooding and cause major problems. Maybe releasing mosquitos fish and other helpers could be more of a natural way of handling the problem instead of risking chemicals getting loose and causing way more harm to the environment. I know my mosquito trap so far has been effective but need to collect more data on a larger scale.

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Today I checked my mosquito trap . (Mosquitos love stagnated water)No mosquitos in the area. Looking downward I noticed a smell of stagnation in the water. This usually is not suitable for larger aquatic life but my mosquito fish tadpoles and snails are fine I added more water to attract insects to the area hopefully I will see something but being near a swamp I should be seeing a lot more insects swarming my water. I also have dragonfly nymph in the trap seems to help feed n keep things in balance possible given a higher percentage rate. Really cant believe no mosquito action maybe sign of success bc normally I gotta spray myself when in backyard.i will be checking trap frequently.

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I noticed a mosquito like insect hovering the trap yesterday. Don't believe the insect to be an actual mosquito but unsure the name but pretty positive the larvae form will turn red when getting near time to morph into adult form. So wondering maybe mosquitos can detect lifeforms in water and avoid the water completely. So far I've been spending hours every day in or around my yard no mosquitos have bitten anyone in my family. 5 miles down the road completely different story.

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Today less insect activity than yesterday. I actually spent way more time in the darkest of areas in my yard than I have all year. Still no mosquitos. Starting to wonder if other factors I am unaware of are causing mosquitos to not be around. This very in unusual for my yard normally have to spray down and keep doors shut. I am thankful however my family is not been bitten this year😀. Maybe my trap is working. Maybe all the tree material I've moved caused I drop in activity in the area or maybe the high amounts of rainfall this year mosquitos may be more concentrated in other areas. I do not know at this time ðŸ™

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So a white/clear film over my water keeps occurring. Wondering if this is a type of stagnation. No plants but maybe algae . 4 to 5 dozen mosquito fish . One tadpole and that's it other than snails and dragon fly nymph. Had other stuff "bettas" but wanted to study mosquito fish behavior

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