vkn

Our experiments with IAVS..

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FYI..

I would be adapting this in the school project I had mentioned recently.. This will have sand culture, water culture, a few independent container culture, drip systems, microgreen trays, vermiculture, sand seedling culture, etc.

I am sure some of you would have seen this design idea before.  Any thoughts/questions?

Honeyland Circle of Life.jpg

Edited by vkn (see edit history)
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I would call the above confirmed school project Honeyland Aquaponics as project L here..  The other project I mentioned earlier as L got delayed for no reasons.

At project L as I mentioned above, we would  have sand culture (almost 50%), water culture (25%), container culture+precision drip systems+microgreens+vermiculture+sand seedling culture, etc. on the next quarter.

Plants would be various options that include veggies, fruits, medicinal, aquatics, small fruiting trees, etc.

Fish would be at least three edible ones and two ornamental species.

I am looking at cheap grow bed building options such as ferro-cement, fiber concrete boards, etc. instead of brick construction.  There is another option of cheap earth bags that I am looking at seriously now.

Based on your responses, as usual, I shall elaborate further.  Cheers!

Edited by vkn (see edit history)
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Plant pests: grasshoppers and leafminers in spinach

Grasshopper in Spinach 091216.jpg

"Red, orange, or yellow – forgo this small fellow. Black, green or brown – go ahead and toss him down." - David George Gordon, The Bug Chef -

There are more than 200 species of grasshoppers, but only a few of these cause significant problems in plants.

It is time for a neem-garlic spray on our spinach! When numbers are low, they can be handpicked and squashed. We feed them to Anabas fish. Whatelse you do?

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Chinese potatoes in Aquaponics

Here is another picture.

Chinese Potato 091216.jpg

The color of chinese potatoes in soil culture is usually dark brown. As you can see this looks different. Taste-wise, there is no change.

They are harvested from our Granite sand (also called as M-sand locally) yield trial @ NARDC Nanniode (Project A). Another batch in side by side comparison with Quartz sand is yet to be ready for harvest. More updates will follow.

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CDAC.jpg

FYI.. Here is a good news to share with you all!

On behalf of NARDC, I am invited to attend/speak/display at a one day national seminar on "Automated Hydroponics: Towards Soilless Crop Production."

Seminar theme is the system designs and crop production under hydroponics.

Tech sessions:
Soilless agriculture - Dr. Bansal, Ex-dean, Palampur Univ. 
Automation and Hydroponics - Mr. Jaspal Singh, CDAC, Mohali
Crop production Under hydroponics - - Dr. Spehia, YSP University, Solan
Aeroponics - Mr. Sukhwinder, CPRI, Jullundhar
Economics & Mechanisation at farm - Dr. V K Sethi, PAU, Ludhiana
My experiences, Hydroponics - Mr. Sangha, Sangha farms, J’dhar
My experiences, Aquaponics - VKN, NARDC Nanniode

Tech demo, Showcasing CDAC’s hydroponics - Mandeep singh, CDAC, M
Visit and demo of the system - Coordinated by project Team

Panel discussion
Valedictory, etc.

Target audience:
Agricultural scientists.
Progressive farmers.
Engineers involved in research and development for agricultural applications.

Organised by:
Center for development of advanced computing, Mohali, and
Dr. Y S Parmer University of Horticulture and Forestry, Solan

Funded by:
Ministry of electronics and IT, Govt. of India

As you may be aware, C-DAC Mohali is a premier scientific organisation of Ministry of Electronics and IT (MeitY), Govt. of India, is working in the area of electronics for medicine and biology.

I am super excited to meet with the agriculture community and related scientists and to share with them my experiences working with aquaponics this far. I would also be looking at the main differences between the two and to explain how aquaponics really is the best of both worlds of hydroponics and aquaculture. Do you have something particular in mind for me to highlight here?

I also hope to meet up with some of my old Himachal Pradesh (Army) friends there.

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Strawberries in Aquaponics sand culture update

These are small treats for kids right off the plants for now but we anticipate full harvest this summer. There are several flowers and fruits in the offing.

They are growing in a matted grow patches in a one cent (40 m2) sand media plot. Initially started off under the shade of tomatoes, the sand beds are now full with runners. We intend to keep this ever-bearing strawberry patch renovated so that it will continue to be productive for three to four years or as much as it would yield fruits.

Strawberry in Aquaponics 080117 (2).jpg

Strawberry in Aquaponics 080117 (3).jpg

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It is time doing heavy pruning and trimming of some tomato trusses under comparative aquaponics yield trials using locally available sands ((river sand and gravel sand (m-sand)) with quartz silica sand at Nanniode (projects A and B).  Here is sharing two new pictures for you.

Tomatoes 270217 (2).jpg

Tomatoes 270217.jpg

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FYI.. Here is another good news to share with you today.

I am invited to talk/present on Aquaponics Organic Farming Movement - the progress made so far in India at the "National Consultative Workshop on Protected Cultivation to Meet Future Challenges (with special Reference to Soilless Cultivation, Hydroponics and Aeroponics) in collaboration with Indian Society for Protected Cultivation, IARI, New Delhi"

Venue: University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad, Karnataka
Dates: 17-18 February 2017

Topics / Thematic areas
- Greenhouse systems, design, climate control and management
- Development of varieties suitable for protected cultivation
- Crop production and management
- Soilless production systems and management
- Use of sensors and automization for Soilless production systems

Participants: Researchers, technicians, academics, other professionals and students working in the field of protected cultivation and also interested growers.

Eminent Speakers
- Dr. Balraj Singh, Vice-Chancellor, Agricultural University, Jodhpur, Rajasthan
- Lt. Cdr. C. V. Prakash, CEO, Pet Bharo Project, Dharwad
- Dr. M. Hasan, Principal Scientist, Centre for Protected Cultivation and Technology, IARI, New Delhi
- Dr. Naved Sabir, Principal Scientist, Centre for Protected Cultivation and Technology, IARI, New Delhi
- Dr. S. S. Sindhu, Head, Division of Floriculture & Landscaping, IARI, New Delhi
- Dr. D. J. Patel, Professor of Entomology(Retd), Anand, Gujarath
- Dr. G. L. Bansal, Formerly Professor & Dean, CSKHP Agricultural University, Palampur, HP
- Dr. D. K. Singh, Professor, G.B.Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantanagar
- Dr. C. Ashwath, Principal Scientist & Head, Division of Floriculture, IIHR, Bengaluru
- Dr. S. S. Hebbar, Principal Scientist, Division of Vegetable Crops, IIHR, Bengaluru
- Mr. Jaspal Singh, Centre for Development of Aadvanced Computing, Ministry of Electronics, GoI, Mohali
- Er. Sukhwinder Singh, Scientist, Central Potato Research Station, Jalandar, Punjab
- Mr. Vijayakumar Narayanan, Aquaponics Futurist, Nanniode Aquaponics Research and Development Center, Palakkad, Kerala

Patron
- Dr. D. P. Biradar, Vice-Chancellor, University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad

National Advisory Committee
- Dr. Brahma Singh, Padma Sri Awardee, Former Director, Life Sciences, DRDO and Founder President,
Indian Society of Protected Cultivation, IARI, New Delhi
- Dr. R. R. Hanchinal, Chairperson, PPV&FR Authority, New Delhi
- Dr. Ashok Dalwai, IAS, Additional Secretary, Department of Agriculture, Cooperation and Farmers Welfare,
Government of India, New Delhi
- Dr. Balraj Singh, Vice-Chancellor, Agricultural University, Jodhpur, Rajasthan
- Dr. D. L. Maheshwar, Vice-Chancellor, University of Horticultural Sciences, Bagalkot, Karnataka
- Dr. C. Vasudevappa, Vice-Chancellor, University of Agricultural and Horticultural Sciences, Shimoga, Karnataka
- Dr. K. P. Viswanatha, Mahatma Phule Krishi Vidyapeeth, Rahuri, Maharashtra
- Dr. Ashok Sarial, Vice-Chancellor, CSKHP Agricultural University, Palampur, HP
- Mr. P. C. Ray, Commissioner of Horticulture, GoK, Bengaluru
- Mr. M. I. Ganagi, Chief General Manager, NABARD, Bengaluru
- Dr. K. V. Peter, Director, World Noni Research Foundation, Chennai
- Dr. Shrinath Dixit, Director, ICAR-ATARI (Zone VIII), Bengaluru
- Dr. M. Hasan, Principal Scientist, Centre for Protected Cultivation and Technology, IARI, New Delhi
- Dr. Naved Sabir, Principal Scientist, Centre for Protected Cultivation and Technology, IARI, New Delhi
- Mr. Mohan Bajikar, Chairman, Vertical Farming Association of India
- Dr. S. M. Mantur, Professor & Head, Hi Tech Horticulture Unit, UAS, Dharwad & Organizing Secretary

Local Organizing Committee
- Dr. D. P. Biradar, Vice-Chancellor, UAS, Dharwad
- Dr. B. S. Janagoudar, Director of Education, UAS, Dharwad
- Mr. Umesh H. Kusagal, IAS, Registrar, UAS, Dharwad
- Dr. S. L. Madiwalar, Director of Research, UAS, Dharwad
- Dr. V. I. Benagi, Director of Extension, UAS, Dharwad
- Dr. S. T. Naik, Dean(PGS), UAS, Dharwad
- Dr. R. S. Giraddi, Dean(Agri), College of Agriculture, Dharwad
- Dr. N. K. Biradarpatil, Dean(Agri), College of Agriculture, Vijayapur
- Dr. R. A. Balikai, Dean(Agri), College of Agriculture, Hanamanamatti
- Dr. H. Basappa, Dean(Forestry), College of Forestry, Sirsi
- Dr. (Mrs.) Chaya A. Badiger, Dean(HSc), College of Rural Home Science, Dharwad
- Dr. M.N. Motebennur, University Librarian, UAS, Dharwad
- Dr. S. K. Gali, Dean(Students Welfare), UAS, Dharwad
- Dr. H. Basavaraja, Comptroller, UAS, Dharwad
- Shri S. C. Mirajkar, Estate Officer, UAS, Dharwad
- Mr. S. M. Honnalli, Administrative Officer, UAS, Dharwad
- Dr. P.R. Dharmatti, Professor & University Head, Dept.of Horticulture, UAS, Dharwad
- Dr. Satish S. Patil, Professor & Head, Dept. of Horticulture, AC, Dharwad

I hope to gain a lot of experience and valuable knowledge from this workshop to further my own diverse range of practical protected cultivation skills. I also hope to meet some of my Karnataka friends at the event.

Dharwad.jpg

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Hi VKN

Good luck with your talks/presentation, in the work shop, I'm sure you'll do great :thumbsu:

cheers

Edited by ande (see edit history)

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Mycofiltration, mycoremediation, or simply to say mushrooms in aquaponics sand culture 

Spawns for our first mushroom trial in sand filters will arrive in a few days.

Please feel free to share your thoughts.

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Aquaponics Family Farmers Association

Think outside the spreadsheet.jpg

We are in the planning stage of our AFFA online forum. We want this knowledge sharing platform to serve you well. It needs to be relevant to your interests and needs.

Please let us know what you wish to learn about aquaponics ways of growing own food, gardening, raising livestock, village-scale aquaponics, commercial aquaponics, and a self sufficient way of life. Other focal areas would be aquaculture, hydroponics, bioponics, permaculture, etc.

AFFA will be comprised of Institutional and Individual members from all over the world. No professional qualifications are required for any of the membership categories – simply an interest to participate in the development of sustainable aquaponics.

Membership categories:
Institutional life membership, Government
Institutional life membership, NGO
Institutional life membership, School
Individual life membership
Individual life membership, retired civilians
Individual life membership, retired soldiers
Individual half-yearly membership
AFFA membership fees: to be finalized.

FAHC (feedahungrychild.org)
The AFFA membership fees are made directly to FAHC bank account as an endowment fund. FAHC will use the accrued interest of this modest fund to support the trust's feeding programs and to increase the reach of the NGO by creating jobs and training opportunities in the fields of aquaponics, RAS, hydroponics, permaculture, etc., to disseminate information, to educate the community, or reinvested to build the endowment.

Some of the benefits of AFFA membership would be as follows:
Up-to-date aquaponics-related information and networking opportunities
Access to NARDCs aquaponics research outcomes and knowledge/experience repository
Ongoing mentoring support
Access to the archive of most vital scientific journals
(relevant research papers, short communications, fact sheets, technical/field notes, etc.)
Reduced registration to future AFFA conferences
Reduced registration to future AFFA workshops and online training events
FAHC News, including general assembly information (minutes of latest meetings), audited financial results, details of beneficiary activities and others
Access to AFFAs quarterly newsletter
An opportunity for members to submit articles in the AFFA magazine

We welcome you to be its founding members and would love your input..

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On 2/1/2017 at 9:57 AM, mattyoga said:

which species vkn?  I'm wondering if they will have eneough carbon available to them?

Though this suggests they can handle C:N of 5:2  http://www.ajol.info/index.php/nifoj/article/view/33577 so maybe the CN ratio in fish poop is fine.

Some milkies, oysters and button mushrooms for starters.  The 3 filters I am trialing this have earthworms in them and one is without worms.  These sand filters have a lot of bio-load from decaying pea and tomato roots that couldn't be removed easily.  I am waiting for several lab results to ascertain what I have and what not in these matured sand filter media.

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Will be interesting to see how they go - King Stropharia would be really good I think for your climate.  I think buttons are generally secondary decomposers so not sure how they will go, though will await the results keenly.

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On 2/16/2017 at 1:15 PM, mattyoga said:

Will be interesting to see how they go - King Stropharia would be really good I think for your climate.  I think buttons are generally secondary decomposers so not sure how they will go, though will await the results keenly.

Sorry Matt.. I had to put this on hold for some time due to other pressing activities and unforeseen travels.  I will come back reporting when we make progress on this.

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This is for you, Mark!

Tomatoes in aquaponics sand culture

Tomatoes yield trial 240217.jpg

Tomatoes yield trial 240217 (2).jpg

These pictures are from the latest replicated on-farm research and yield trial being conducted at NARDC, Nanniode.

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Here is another group of family farmers that took up aquaponics recently.  I guess it is |project M', will confirm later.

Ettumanoor Aquaponics.jpg

It is a self-providing domestic unit in about 101 m2. Two species of fish will co-exist here, red-bellied pacu and monosex nile tilapia.

Red bellied pacu.jpg

Anything else you want to know, please just ask and I will try elaborating.

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We are currently busy working on these projects L and N, Honeyland Aquaponics ("circle of life" school project) in 700 m2 and Coimbatore Aquaponics (a village scale owner/operated project) in 160 m2.  

Honeyland Aquaponics.jpg

Coimbatore Aquaponics.jpg

Here are some update pictures from those sites.

 

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VK, have you found any Root Knot Nematodes in any of your iAVs systems?  Found my beds have been invaded by RKN's and researching remedies suitable for AP/iAVs.  

Anxious to see your Circle of Life finished and producing.

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7 hours ago, Aufin said:

VK, have you found any Root Knot Nematodes in any of your iAVs systems?  Found my beds have been invaded by RKN's and researching remedies suitable for AP/iAVs.  

Anxious to see your Circle of Life finished and producing.

Are you sure they are nematodes?  I have not observed any nematode infestations in our sand culture yet.  However, I am asking the operators to closely examine the plants especially those growing in older beds to look out for yellowing of leaves, smaller leaves, less yields, stunted growth, etc.  They may have come through infested sand (river/beach sand), nursery saplings (used directly without removing potting mix), or soil attached to tools used elsewhere, etc.  

Sanitation is important.  One of the many reasons, I use gravel in the pathways as mulch to the soil surface around the beds and not allow any visitors to step on the bed walls (seen people doing it), etc.  Management of it organically is quite difficult in soil culture as nematodes spread everywhere easily.  Soil farmers try to reduce infestations by fallowing, crop rotation (not very effective), soil solarization, etc.  You may want to try solarization in your sand beds.  One way to do it is to moisten the bed and cover it with a translucent plastic tarp for about 6 weeks during hot summer.  This would kill all your nematodes.  I am sure there are better/quicker ways to tackle your situation.  What do others think?

'Circle of Life' project is shaping up well and we are equally excited in seeing its go live in about 2 weeks from now.  Good news is it is going to be all sand culture/iAVs.  No other growing techniques are deployed here. I will update the status.

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Yes I'm sure it's the RKNS.  Stripped all plants out, decoupled the drain from the fish tank, capped the drain line and flooded with water.  At present bed is sitting filled above the sand and treated with neem oil.  Will drain and flush with fresh water tomorrow.   Hopefully when reattached to the tank any residue should be light enough to not bother the tilapia and maybe provide a small treatment dose to the rest of my sandbeds. I know the other beds have RKNS but not to the extent of the large bed.  Intend to establish a light maintenance dose of neem to try to get rid of the remaining nematodes.  The scientific papers I've found trialling neem for RKN treatment have been very positive.  But they were trialing traditional dirt farming, not closed system APs.  Hope this works. Noone I've talked to has offered any guidelines for treating an aquaponics system, so I'm pretty much in trial-and-error mode......hopefully with minimal error.

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Aufin, Neem oil seems to be a good choice in managing nematodes.  Let us know how your trials went.

I have been using it as a diluted foliar spray for various pests as a general purpose insecticide, miticide, fungicide, etc.  Even if it drips a bit in the sand beds, there are no adverse effects seen for most all fish.  Some fish like climbing perch were found sensitive to it and we saw some mortality.  There could be other reasons for that episode though.

I forgot to say you can also use Marigolds (Tagetes spp) as a companion plant.  They are known to repel/suppress/reduce soil nematodes naturally.  Planting them densely before two months of introducing host plants such as tomatoes is another option.  

 

 

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