vkn

Our experiments with IAVS..

829 posts in this topic

Our okra much light in color and more plump we gonna fry some tomorrow how you like you okra?I am very good at growing okra in fields but you are running them in Ap system?

Mike, my own favorite okra recipe is here.. http://mydhaba.blogspot.in/2006/09/ladies-fingers-pachadi.html

And this in my cookbook in the making.. http://mydhaba.blogspot.in/2007/01/vcc-231-stuffed-baingan-and-okra.html  While you are there.. please keep clicking on those links and browse around just to know what else I have been doing other than Aquaponics.

 

Yes I have okra in my AP systems as well as in container culture (1 ft2 grow bags).. no soil involved anywhere.

Edited by vkn (see edit history)

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Just to give you an example.. have a look at how my cowpeas are growing in a run to waste trickle filter system.. 

 

post-4243-0-32248900-1466797927_thumb.jp

 

Almost same timing 15+ minutes or so to drench.. No drain.  Media is sand.

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Seeing your work reminds me of this quote.

 

“Nothing in this world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. The slogan Press On! has solved and always will solve the problems of the human race.â€
― Calvin Coolidge

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Seeing your work reminds me of this quote.

 

“Nothing in this world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. The slogan Press On! has solved and always will solve the problems of the human race.â€

― Calvin Coolidge

Nice quote, Ravnis and a great coicidence of interest.  I had posted this quote a decade ago at my old blog here - http://inspiringwords.blogspot.in/2005/05/persistence.html

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I feel like I am once again in the doldrums.  The quartz sand cost comes to almost 30% of the capex for project H (including transport and labor) but granite grits are much cheaper, around 12%.  

 

As this client is a very small farmer, I am searching around for the best available granite grits.  This project is on a budget.  I will need approximately 40 metric tonnes of sand here.

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Added these sturdy little fella, Anabas fingerlings, at Nandika Aquaponics (Project E/4000) and at NARDC Nanniode (Project B/10000) yesterday at the rate of 200 fish per cubic meter water volume.

In an EASY system (Project A) we also recently added a bigger number of 300 Anabas fish/m3 in proportion. A batch of this fish is also growing at Vallikunnam aquaponics (Project G/1200).

post-4243-0-11363600-1467613071_thumb.jp post-4243-0-78177400-1467613076_thumb.jp post-4243-0-19402000-1467613080_thumb.jp

Its ability to breathe air from atmosphere and to live out of water for protracted period makes it a very suitable future fish for aquaponics as food fish or of commercial importance.

 

Scientific name: Anabas cobojius Etymology: Anabas: Greek, anabasis means climbing up

English names: Climbing perch, Gangetic koi, climbing gourami

Local names: Chempally, Karoop, Andikalli, Kalluthi, Karroo, Karipidi, Kalladamutty, Kaithakora, Koi (not the ornamental Koi, it is Bengal Koi), etc.

 

Next I will get you a video story of Nandika aquaponics (Project E) build updates in a while.

 

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Plant Diseases: Blossom-End Rot in Arka Rakshak Tomatoes

 

Noticed an initial symptom of blossom-end rot in one of the tomatoes growing in Aquaponics sand filter today at NARDC Nanniode (Project B).

 

post-4243-0-04913600-1467645275_thumb.jp

Click to enlarge

 

We are not using any other supplements other than fish food and supplementary plant feed such as azolla, moringa leaves, colacasia leaves, etc. There are also thousands of apple snails growing in this fish culture tank being used as supplementary feed for the fish.  They also help cleaning the open fish tank walls by eating algae. There could be a calcium imbalance caused by those snails using up calcium for their shell development.

 

We have some powdered dolomite and would also powder some of the used up snail shells and use them by adding it to the fish water. What would you do to improve calcium naturally?

 

I also would want to keep the plants a little on the dry side for a few weeks during this time of flowering and fruit setting days. Trialing it by extending the times of no-flow events during night.

 

Reduce feed to reduce Nitrogen during the phase of fruit-ripening/maturity?  Fruits need the nitrates in reduced amounts to maintain fruit fill during the phase of ripening/maturity.  I do not know how we could accomplish this effectively in sand filters. Waiting to have this discussed with my mentors. Any thoughts you have.. I appreciate it!

 

post-4243-0-94797400-1467645266_thumb.jp post-4243-0-56523900-1467645271_thumb.jp

Other than this, the Arka Rakshak tomatoes in Aquaponics are growing good with several bunches of flowers, fruit set is 70 to 80%, expansion of fruits are rapid.

Edited by vkn (see edit history)

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I'm curious first as to what the pH is in that system with the blossom rot.   When I first read about the snails, my first impression was the snail shells absorbing the calcium.   Is there any chance to test the calcium level in the water?

 

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought the drop in nitrogen triggered fruit set, but was not required to maintain it.   Dropping feed and thus nutrient levels, might be contributing to the problem.  A calcium test and pH test would help rule in/out issues.  

 

I recall reading about disease transmission when growing snails with other aquatic livestock.  I don't know enough to say one way or the other, but if you're going to do that, you probably should look into it to see if it's a liability or not. If you haven't already.

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Nandika Aquaponics at Poonjar has recently gone operational. Here is a build story..  
 
 
I hope you like it.

 

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Thank you for your thoughtful comments.  My replies side by side please.

 

I'm curious first as to what the pH is in that system with the blossom rot.   When I first read about the snails, my first impression was the snail shells absorbing the calcium.   Is there any chance to test the calcium level in the water?

[vkn] Unfortunately we do not have a calcium tester.. I will try to get one in a week.  The pH is constant at 7.2 after a few interventions made recently.  It was at 7.4 for a very long time.

 

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought the drop in nitrogen triggered fruit set, but was not required to maintain it.   Dropping feed and thus nutrient levels, might be contributing to the problem.  A calcium test and pH test would help rule in/out issues.

[vkn] Isn't it the reverse, Ravnis?  Per my understanding plants need a lot of N during growing/flowering/fruit setting stage but less N during its maturity/coloring phase.  No, I have not started this yet and was just thinking it loud to read your thoughts. 

 

I recall reading about disease transmission when growing snails with other aquatic livestock.  I don't know enough to say one way or the other, but if you're going to do that, you probably should look into it to see if it's a liability or not. If you haven't already.

[vkn]Frankly, I do not believe in this as I could not find a scientific study yet to back up the notion that snails spread disease transmission.  These apple snails are in my systems for over 3 years.  They help in plenty of small ways plus a great addition as a supplementary feed.  There are no visible damages to either our fish, plants or humans.  I could be wrong though.  Can you point to any good studies done on this subject.. please?

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Some information that may help your tomatoes .   Am NOT suggesting the equipment he's selling.  Just the information only.  http://www.thesilveredge.com/gardeners-colloidal-silver-kills-plant-fungus-produces-larger-and-healthier-crops.shtml#.V3rt4om3PJF

 

http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/2756/

Aufin, looks very interesting.. Thanks for sharing this.  I will check if I could get a small dose of nano-scale colloidal silver in India and to do a similar plant-oriented tests and evaluation.  Also we would need to research if there are any adverse impacts of it on filter bacteria and fish.

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This study is old, but shows increased yield with increase N and K during fruiting phase.       http://www.publish.csiro.au/?paper=EA9880391

 

I just remember the greatest drop in nitrates in my system occurred when tomatoes were making fruit. 

 

This is probably basic and applies to field growth, but the part about the difference between ammonia nitrogen and nitrate and it's effect on blossom rot, may lead to a clue.   http://extension.uga.edu/publications/detail.cfm?number=B1312#Lime

 

 

 

The snail issue does not seem to apply to your region or species, looks like mainly southern Africa.   http://www.fao.org/docrep/005/ad002e/AD002E03.htm

 

 

Colloidal silver is sold as  one of a few microbial killers in swimming pool circles.  Levels used likely vary, but I would definitely research or at the least test with a small batch.

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Nothing much to report but I am busy at Devana Aquaponics works at Kunnamkulam, Thrissur (Project H). Here is a picture from day #3.

 

post-4243-0-91336200-1467992940_thumb.jp

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VKN,

 

I see pictures on your Facebook posts that often show things like Banana trees and tomatoes.  Do you have some cultivar of tomatoes that actually produce in summer heat?  We get summers where temps will reach 35C on a daily basis, and night time temps that sometimes don't dip below 23-28C.  I find tomatoes just drop blossoms then.  Am I seeing only a tiny bit of the big picture, or do you all have access to different cultivars of tomatoes?

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This study is old, but shows increased yield with increase N and K during fruiting phase.       http://www.publish.csiro.au/?paper=EA9880391

 

I just remember the greatest drop in nitrates in my system occurred when tomatoes were making fruit. 

 

[vkn] That is right, Ravinis.. Thanks for your inputs.  Just to repeat and to make myself clear.. per my understanding tomatoes need lots of N during growing/flowering/fruiting stages but during maturation stages, i thought, they need less nutrients (especially N).  In DWC systems, we have an option to reduce nitrates by extending the bio-filter cleaning process (increasing mineralization process) so that nitrates get lost.  We do not have that process working with sand beds.  That was my question.  Hope it makes more clear now. 

 

This is probably basic and applies to field growth, but the part about the difference between ammonia nitrogen and nitrate and it's effect on blossom rot, may lead to a clue.   http://extension.uga.edu/publications/detail.cfm?number=B1312#Lime

 

[vkn] Sorry I could not read it even now.. I will read it during the weekend and will share thoughts, if any.

 

The snail issue does not seem to apply to your region or species, looks like mainly southern Africa.   http://www.fao.org/docrep/005/ad002e/AD002E03.htm

[vkn]On apple snails, we need several research on this subject.  They are so cool to work with as an algae eater in fish tanks, supplementary feed for fish, as a protein-rich food for human as a delicacy item, etc. Hopefully some myths against them would also be sorted out.

 

Colloidal silver is sold as  one of a few microbial killers in swimming pool circles.  Levels used likely vary, but I would definitely research or at the least test with a small batch.

[vkn] I have no clue if that would kill the bacteria and/or fish when used in aquaponics systems.  Thanks to Aufin.. small doses, I am waiting for an opportunity to try that at my systems.

Edited by vkn (see edit history)

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Several things happening at our end.. I am finding less time to report things here.  I hope you would like these 3-in-1 update pictures from project B as seen yesterday.   Okra (ladies finger), tomatoes, and brinjals (eggplants) growing together in aquaponics sand filters at NARDC Nanniode.

This okra plant had sprung up again from the stem cut completely after first season, going strong again with two branches.

Okra in Aquaponics 210716.jpg

These fruits are from our first batch of Arka Rakshak cultivar that I posted before.

Tomatoes in Aquaponics 210716.jpg

After heavy pruning a month ago, the brinjals in sand filters have started fruiting once again.. This is their second avatar.. some are close to a feet long not seen anything like these before. The plants are over 9 months old.

Brijjals in Aquaponics 210716.jpg

Any format/new changes at the forum?  I see larger pictures than usual.

Edited by vkn (see edit history)

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On 7/8/2016 at 9:22 PM, craig1267 said:

VKN,

 

I see pictures on your Facebook posts that often show things like Banana trees and tomatoes.  Do you have some cultivar of tomatoes that actually produce in summer heat?  We get summers where temps will reach 35C on a daily basis, and night time temps that sometimes don't dip below 23-28C.  I find tomatoes just drop blossoms then.  Am I seeing only a tiny bit of the big picture, or do you all have access to different cultivars of tomatoes?

Craig, most all tomatoes that we have here are perennial cultivars.  I noticed blossom drops at a few occasions in summer but our summers are 42+C.  This is a problem in open systems but I found less issues in climate controlled shade houses.  I don't know if this answers your question.. if not, please clarify your question again.

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Beautiful VKN. 

 

 

The forum software was just  updated.  Should make things run smoother.

 

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On 7/22/2016 at 11:57 AM, vkn said:

Craig, most all tomatoes that we have here are perennial cultivars.  I noticed blossom drops at a few occasions in summer but our summers are 42+C.  This is a problem in open systems but I found less issues in climate controlled shade houses.  I don't know if this answers your question.. if not, please clarify your question again.

VKN,

This is of interest to me.  Tomatoes here would never produce in 42C. When temps hit the 30s they pretty much stop producing.  They flower, but nothing happens.   Also high humidity.  I'd really like to to know how you get yours to keep setting fruit. I shade everything, but I don't control for humidity since I only have shade covers, not any kind of greenhouse or humidity control.  Perhaps you have tomato cultivars that strive in high temps (nighttime temp) and humidity?
 

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Updates from One Cent Aquaroponics, Edappal (project F)
This unit (40m2) is about 2 months and a few days old.

What is Aquaroponics?
We look at it as a true hybrid of aquaponics and aeroponics technologies with recycling aquaculture system and sand media filters. We hope to achieve maximum crop quality and output in this fairly self-sustained production unit.

The unit owner Dr. Mohammed Kutty is now trialing several varieties of plants in the aeroponics chamber.  Cucumbers, chillies, egg plants, carrots, potatoes, onions, bitter gourd, etc. are some of them.  Have a look at the attached pictures.

Aquaroponics 270716 (9).jpgAquaroponics 270716 (2).jpgAquaroponics 270716 (11).jpgAquaroponics 270716 (13).jpg

The 2x1 m2 aeroponics chamber on top of the raised fish tank with variety of plants under trial.

tAquaroponics 270716.jpg

The 2x1 m2 aeroponics chamber..

Aquaroponics 270716 (8).jpg

Chilies growing in aeroponics chamber

Aquaroponics 270716 (7).jpg

Cucumber roots growing inside aeroponics chamber..

Aquaroponics 270716 (3).jpg

Cucumber roots inside aeroponics chamber..

Aquaroponics 270716 (12).jpg

Cluster bean in sand beds..

It is a CHOP process but two pumps are used.  The water flow for now is from fish tank to sand filters by gravity and sump to aeroponics chamber and fish tank by two different pumps set on timers. One challenge we are trying to address is the slow water movement by gravity from fish tank to sand filters.  Another issue, all solids are not lifted thereby increasing turbidity and high ammonia in the fish tank.  We have also noticed concentration of solid wastes near the inflow points of furrows.  I am thinking of changing this water flow by transferring the pump on timer from sump to the fish tank and to add a sump pump on a float switch.  This is just for your info and for any inputs you may want to add on this.

Aquaroponics 270716 (4).jpg

Okra (ladies finger) in sand beds

Aquaroponics 270716 (6).jpg

Cowpea in sand beds..

Aquaroponics 270716 (10).jpg

Tomatoes in sand beds

Edited by vkn (see edit history)

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On 7/4/2016 at 8:46 PM, vkn said:

Plant Diseases: Blossom-End Rot in Arka Rakshak Tomatoes

 

Noticed an initial symptom of blossom-end rot in one of the tomatoes growing in Aquaponics sand filter today at NARDC Nanniode (Project B).

 

Arka Rakshak 040716 (2).jpg

Click to enlarge

 

We are not using any other supplements other than fish food and supplementary plant feed such as azolla, moringa leaves, colacasia leaves, etc. There are also thousands of apple snails growing in this fish culture tank being used as supplementary feed for the fish.  They also help cleaning the open fish tank walls by eating algae. There could be a calcium imbalance caused by those snails using up calcium for their shell development.

 

We have some powdered dolomite and would also powder some of the used up snail shells and use them by adding it to the fish water. What would you do to improve calcium naturally?

 

I also would want to keep the plants a little on the dry side for a few weeks during this time of flowering and fruit setting days. Trialing it by extending the times of no-flow events during night.

 

Reduce feed to reduce Nitrogen during the phase of fruit-ripening/maturity?  Fruits need the nitrates in reduced amounts to maintain fruit fill during the phase of ripening/maturity.  I do not know how we could accomplish this effectively in sand filters. Waiting to have this discussed with my mentors. Any thoughts you have.. I appreciate it!

 

Arka Rakshak 040716.jpg Arka Rakshak 040716 (3).jpg

Other than this, the Arka Rakshak tomatoes in Aquaponics are growing good with several bunches of flowers, fruit set is 70 to 80%, expansion of fruits are rapid.

Please ignore this above post.  It was a false symptom seen in only fruit but it expanded naturally later.  None of the other tomato fruits in the system displayed symptoms of blossom end rot.

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Aquaroponics, here are two more pictures from Edappal One Cent Aquaponics project (project E).

Aeroponics is a hydroponics variation in which plant roots are suspended in air and continually misted with nutrient solution. In this trial, we are misting the aeroponics chamber with filtered fish powered nutrients. Mechanical and biological filtration is achieved by sand media culture. Results look promising so far and can't wait to see potatoes and carrots dangling in the air.

Aquaroponics 010816 (2).jpg Aquaroponics 010816.jpg

Feedback are welcome.

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Hi VKN,

The plants look good.

Have you noticed any difference in the rate of growth between this system and those that preceded it?

If I recall correctly, the aeroponics system utilises micro-sprinklers rather than spray jets.  Is that correct?

I'm looking forward to seeing the results of the doctor's potato and carrot experiments.

Gary

Edited by GaryD (see edit history)

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@vkn

Do you know how I could obtain some seed from some of those tomato cultivars that produce in your climate?  I wonder if this is even possible with import/export rules....

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