kellenw

What have you harvested lately?

63 posts in this topic

I'll start this one off. We are currently harvesting:

- About 4 pounds of cherry tomatoes a day.

- 1/2 ton of potatoes, finished in the ground, started in our AP system.

- Plentiful amounts of various peppers.

- Huge amounts of Kale from our media based system, more than we can eat so much of it goes to the goats and chickens.

- Lettuce in huge amounts, but it is now in the bolt stage, so it's pretty pungent... most of it goes to the goats and chickens.

So how about you? Bonus points for pictures. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 I have a bunch of tilapia i need to start culling in small groups  unless i want to clean like 300 fish in november. my produce is barely hanging on in this 100 degree heat.  I am just now starting to really start to try to understand the nuances of what to plant when.

 

brian

kellenw likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Brian,

 

If you do decide to process a heap of fish, consider making fish hydrolysate with the heads and bones.  It 's evidently a very good plant food.

 

Gary

kellenw likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Harvesting cherry tomatoes, eggplant (8 from one plant so far, but not looking like its going to produce more at this time) and   have some baseball sized water melons getting near to being ready to harvest in my sand bed.  In the  gravel beds the plants have all but died due to the heat.   Sand somehow seems to protect in the heat, though productivity has also dropped with this last heat wave.

Edited by Ravnis (see edit history)
kellenw likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We've got wild-sown cherry tomatoes around the place.  They're a good snack as we move around the backyard.  The pup likes them, too.

kellenw likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi

Been clearing some wood land harwesting around  +/- 200 m3  sitka/douglas/spruce pine/fir , last 6 weeks, still +/-, 400 m3  to go

tallest once around 30meter high

largest here post-968-0-19534700-1439838745_thumb.jpg

and a pic of a wind fall post-968-0-97638400-1439837773_thumb.jpg

wich is the trigger reason for the hole operation, they started to get dangerous to people

 

also have been harwesting loads of wild berrys, hazelnuts, and mushrooms, and the aples harwest  looks promesing do to all the rain fall.

The kitchen garden have been lousy this year, we more or less gave it up with the coldest may,june and july since 1958

next year it will be in hugelbeds are building a few with all the lumber available from the wood clearing.

 

cheers

kellenw likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got so much harvesting all the time, I don't even know where to start.

 

Made prickly pear jelly, mint jelly, plum jam, and apple preserves today.

 

Butcher 6-10 rabbits every week.  I cut about 2 buckets of weeds/grass for them every day.  I have about 20 muscovy ducks to be butchered, and we get about a 20 eggs a day (chicken, guinea, duck).

 

Garden is overflowing with tomatoes, cucumber, squash, peppers, beans, potatoes, mushrooms, and leafy veg.

 

Peaches, apples, mulberries, plums are all ripe on the trees right now.

 

The Forest Garden is bursting at the seams, and we planted several more trees this year, including loquat, pecan, figs, pear, american plums, pistachios, and almonds. 

Really getting into Prickly Pear farming this year, it's been great for erosion control on the dry slopes and produces awesome fruit.

 

Apple cider season is almost here, as well as fruit wines.  Yum!

Edited by velacreations (see edit history)
kellenw likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Had some surprise chilacoyotes pop out - wasn't expecting them in the middle of winter :)

Plus some eggplants in the greenhouse - would be lots of tomatoes too if I could stop the rats eating them :(

kellenw likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Abe,

 

It's interesting that you are able to make such good use of Prickly Pear.  In Australia, they are viewed very differently.  

 

Like most invasive species, they were introduced for a reason that probably seemed OK at the time but subsequently went very wrong,  In the case of Prickly Pear it was something to do with establishing a cochineal industry,

 

At one stage, they rendered a very large tract of farmland useless to the point whee the government of the day arranged for the importation of the Cactoblastis beetle which successfully brought them under control.

 

Most of Australia's exotic importations haven't had such a happy ending.

 

Gary

velacreations and kellenw like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They should have imported the spineless variety and Australia's wildlife would have kept it in check. Perspective is everything with these things.  Just like rabbits, who are wonderful livestock for the small homestead, become a problem when people ignore the natural checks and balances that exist in native ecosystems.

 

Prickly Pear are native here, and we have all kinds of varieties, with fruit coming in lots of different sizes, flavors and colors.  They are an extremely useful plant, being one of the most efficient plants with regards to water efficiency. I believe it takes 1.5 kg of water to make 1 kg of prickly pear biomass.  Harvests for the pads (vegetable) average over 100 tons/hectare without irrigation.

I'm planting spineless varieties throughout our property on contours for erosion control and perennial fruit and vegetable production.  They are super easy to propagate and grow in our climate, and provide a wonderful multi-use plant that survives despite anything you do.

 

The native spined ones go along the perimeter fence that will eventually become and impenetrable wall of spines in a few years.  These cactus fences are great for predator protection in our area, even keeping out foxes.  They also save me a lot of money on fence maintenance. :)

Here's the fruit and jelly we make, super simple and a favorite among just about everyone that tries it.

Ryr4DdG.jpg

 

Take those fruit, wash them real good, cut into pieces and boil for about 20 minutes.  Strain and you have this juice:

 

Oq3yZaO.jpg

 

Once you have the juice, it's like any jelly.  Add sugar, acid, pectin and can:

X5JWwq9.jpg

 

Edited by velacreations (see edit history)
kellenw and ande like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

didn't know there was a spineless type - wonder if we can get it in Oz?  Can t be grown from seeds?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have no idea if you can get them there, because it's probably regulated.  There are lots of spineless varieties for many species. 

6151_IMG02296.JPG

 

CACTUS%20spineless%20hand%20size.jpg

 

All of the ones grown in Latin America and Africa for human consumption are pretty much spineless.

 

They can be grown from seeds, but they are a tricky.  You need acid treatment, then cold stratification for 3 months, then hot germination (30C, I think)

kellenw likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can see how they'd be a valued item in their native environments.

 

One of the rationales for using the spiny ones was their capacity to provide an impenetrable fence.....as you've described.

 

Gary

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also wonder if spineless revert back to spines after going "feral", maybe?  I know that anything will graze the spineless ones, once they get a few feet tall, they are ok, but when they are young, everything loves them.  It's sometimes hard to get them going without everything eating them.

Edited by velacreations (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Overview

Due to its antioxidant action, prickly pear cactus juice can be used to improve your overall health, may be able to reduce cancer risk and can even reduce the severity of your hangover when you overindulge in alcohol. It’s available in supplement form, or you can use seven to 10 medium cactus fruits to make one cup of cactus puree. Strain your raw fruit pulp through a medium-fine wire strainer. This removes fibers and seeds. Freeze pulp and puree for future use, recommends Ran Knishinsky in “Prickly Pear Cactus Medicine.†Always consult a health care professional before using a new supplement.

 

Anti-Cancer Agent Cactus juice may help reduce risk for cancer, says Da-ming Zou, lead author for a study published in Nutrition Journal. It may someday be used as a natural alternative to chemoprevention of cancer, in which chemical agents are used to ward off cancer among high-risk populations. Chemical agents are expensive and have numerous undesirable side effects. Cactus juice may be a good alternative because it can inhibit cancer cell growth and slow tumor growth, says Zou. Cactus works just as well as a synthetic retinoid that’s being used in chemoprevention trials, Zou says, but he notes that more study is needed to confirm this benefit and the mechanism by which the cactus works.

 

Antioxidant Action

Cactus juice provides antioxidant benefits, says Luisa Tesoriere, lead author for a study published in the “American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.†In fact, Tesoriere says it works as well as vitamin C supplementation in enhancing overall antioxidant defense in the body, and outpaces vitamin C in reducing oxidation of fats, a process that contributes to atherosclerosis. Prickly pear supplementation also may cut risk of degenerative and age-related diseases that oxidative stress plays a role in, says Tesoriere.

 

Hangover Prevention

Prickly pear cactus juice may help you prevent—or at least lessen the effects of—hangovers, says J. Wiese, lead author for a study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine. Hangover severity may be related to byproducts of alcohol metabolism as well as inflammation caused by impurities in the alcohol. Cactus juice diminishes your body’s inflammatory response. Wiese conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial and found that people who used the juice prior to drinking cut risk of a severe hangover in half. The juice significantly reduces three classic hangover symptoms: nausea, dry mouth and loss of appetite, Wiese notes.

ande, velacreations and kellenw like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We gathered some more prickly pear fruit yesterday.  We found 3 different species, each has a distinct flavor.  The green one in this photo we bought from the store for comparison (this is eaten like a vegetable, not ripe).

 

sAOVgtA.jpg

 

t67c3wF.jpg

 

 

The round one we are calling prickly apples, because that's the taste they have.  The others are similar to watermelon.

 

Here's the total haul, which took about 30 minutes to pick:

mxwbyMK.jpg

 

 

Total was 16 kg of fruit.  It should made 10 liters of juice.  It came from about 5 plants.

 

8HHqO9B.jpg


We also picked about 65 pads for planting. These were from the best fruit producing plants.

 

There's a lot more out there to harvest, I think we could easily gather at least 3 times this with what is currently ripe.

Edited by velacreations (see edit history)
ande and kellenw like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

post-3002-0-31069000-1441581622_thumb.jp

 

Oversized limes, I dont pick them green they are still the same colour inside but marginally sweeter. Picked 60 off the ground on Saturday. They have been flowering and setting fruit continuously this year. Mandarin has set fruit for the first time and the tree is loaded.

kellenw likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice.  I have some kind of sliced lemon, lime, tangerine tree thing.  I guess it was spliced. There are some lemons that are big like apples. 

kellenw likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We gathered some more prickly pear fruit yesterday.  We found 3 different species, each has a distinct flavor.  The green one in this photo we bought from the store for comparison (this is eaten like a vegetable, not ripe).

 

sAOVgtA.jpg

 

t67c3wF.jpg

 

 

The round one we are calling prickly apples, because that's the taste they have.  The others are similar to watermelon.

 

Here's the total haul, which took about 30 minutes to pick:

mxwbyMK.jpg

 

 

Total was 16 kg of fruit.  It should made 10 liters of juice.  It came from about 5 plants.

 

8HHqO9B.jpg

We also picked about 65 pads for planting. These were from the best fruit producing plants.

 

There's a lot more out there to harvest, I think we could easily gather at least 3 times this with what is currently ripe.

Can you make wine from that? Not sure why but it just seems like the right thing to do.  

Ravnis, kellenw and MikeRich like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you make wine from that? Not sure why but it just seems like the right thing to do.  

sure can, and I have a batch brewing right now, only about 8 liters or so, just to try it out.  I'm racking it off this week.  I've never made it before, but I've had it from other people, and it can be very good.

Strider and kellenw like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now