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kellenw

Goats have arrived

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We finally had time this Spring to finish fencing a couple of smaller pastures on the farm, so we recently added 6 goats, with more to come.  Five of them are does/doelings.  One is a whether.  Four of them are young Boer doelings.  Two are Myotonics (fainters)... one a 2 year old doe and one a 2 year old whether that came for "free" (in other words we had to take him) with the myotonic doe.  We will be acquiring several purebred New Zealand Kiko does/doelings and a purebred Kiko buck soon.  The Kiko buck will be the herd sire.  

 

This will primarily be a small meat goat operation, and we'll also be providing some commercial and registered purebred breeders.  I've done primarily dairy goats in the past, and I'll probably add a dairy doe or two eventually, but not right now.

 

It's been a long time since I've kept goats.  I have to say, it's been a lot of fun already.  I missed watching the ridiculousness that only goats are capable of demonstrating.  Just finished some hoof trimming, CDT vaccinations for everyone, and did a few dewormings.  Everyone appears to be acclimating well to their new digs.

 

I'll try to add some pictures in the next few days.

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Goats are great animals but they will test fences....even electric ones.  Their feet need periodic trimming if they are not housed on rocky ground.

 

The milk from goats can be made into some really nice cheeses.....including some very simple ricotta and whey cheeses.  Twelve months of handmilking goats will leave you with very powerful hands.

 

The meat from goats is good stuff.  Baby goat meat (capretto) is to die for - if you can stomach the thought of where it came from.  Young goat meat (chevon) is like prime lamb but with much less fat.  Old goat meat is gamey and should only ever be cooked by cooks skilled in middle eastern cuisines.

 

Gary

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Nice!  Though, I'm hoping you don't have to bottle feed.  We are considering adding some hair sheep this year for meat.  I like katahdins alot, so that's the breed we'll probably go with here, but Spælsau sheep look like really hardy animals too.

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Hi

Yeah sure hope I don't have to bottle feed, looking good thus far :thumbsu:

Yeah Spælsau are really hardy, needs minimum or non suplemental feeding nor housing, if there is heavy snow they will feed on shrubs and three bark.

Got another arrival yesterday, twins this time around :D

 

GOPR7017.JPG

 

 

cheers

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Nice!  We have had 6 kids (3 sets of twins) so far from our does. Unfortunately, 5 out of 6 are bucklings.  I was hoping for a good crop of doelings this year to add to the herd.  I have 3 more does left to kid, and they should be birthing within the next 3-5 days hopefully.  There better be a lot of girls this next round! :)

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6-8 weeks you'll have good eating Cabrito, They sell here for $85-120 ea. on the hoof. split the breast fold out and side cook on spits, next to the fire pit.

Wrap the innards into a ball with the small intestines, and BBQ them on a spit, Machaquito's.

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@Old Prospector - Totally agree. We have a pretty strong market here for goat meat, which is helpful. You can make a bit more selling from the farm, but sale barn prices have been strong and rising for the last several years here as well.  I'm going to try to market the best bucklings as replacement breeder bucks to try and get a few extra dollars, and probably whether a couple and grow out to a bit larger size to put in the freezer.  Any remaining will be sold for meat.

Our long term plan is to continue to breed our herd up to "purebred" kikos, and sell registered breeders.  We'll always have lots of culls to deal with though, so we'll be in the meat business still too.

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I saw the funniest thing driving by a farm with goats. It had poured rain earlier and the goats were in a shed. As I drove by a soaked one popped his head and and looked up at the sky. As if to say, "does it look like it's going to rain again?" 

I've thought about getting a goat or two to keep some of my pond banks trimmed. Anybody have any suggestions on what kind? I don't want them to reproduce so may a couple of males? 

Edited by Cecil (see edit history)

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Goats are pretty funny, and provide a lot of entertainment.  They are also fantastic at cleaning up weeds and overgrown brush.  They aren't entirely maintenance free though.  Deworming when needed, hoof trimming, etc.

The lowest maintenance are typically Spanish goats, Myotonic goats and Kiko goats.  If you're going to keep a couple of males, it's best to get wethers (fixed goats).  Intact males stink pretty badly, especially during Fall rut.  For wethers, I think Bokis (50% Boer, 50% Kiko) are also fantastic.

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