velacreations

BSFL on human waste

23 posts in this topic

I was reading about different insect integrations with waste streams and came across this one:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/tmi.12228/pdf
 

objectives To determine the capacity of black soldier fly larvae (BSFL) (Hermetia illucens) to convert fresh human faeces into larval biomass under different feeding regimes, and to determine how effective BSFL are as a means of human faecal waste management.

methods Black soldier fly larvae were fed fresh human faeces. The frequency of feeding, number of larvae and feeding ratio were altered to determine their effects on larval growth, prepupal weight, waste reduction, bioconversion and feed conversion rate (FCR).

results The larvae that were fed a single lump amount of faeces developed into significantly larger larvae and prepupae than those fed incrementally every 2 days; however, the development into pre- pupae took longer. The highest waste reduction was found in the group containing the most larvae, with no difference between feeding regimes. At an estimated 90% pupation rate, the highest bioconversion (16–22%) and lowest, most efficient FCR (2.0–3.3) occurred in groups that contained 10 and 100 larvae, when fed both the lump amount and incremental regime.

conclusion The prepupal weight, bioconversion and FCR results surpass those from previous studies into BSFL management of swine, chicken manure and municipal organic waste. This suggests that the use of BSFL could provide a solution to the health problems associated with poor sanitation and inadequate human waste management in developing countries.

 


So, feeding Black Soldier Fly Larvae fresh human faeces resulted in FCR of 2.0–3.3, which is better than a lot of insects, and better than BSFL on a lot of manures.

Now, they could be sterilized (chemically, like fermentation, or with heat) and fed to animals.  Chickens, in particular, would be a good one for this, maybe dogs, too.  I don't know if I would risk it with fish, but maybe.

An average human excretes 1.1 kg of faeces per day, which could make 330-500 grams of BSF daily! That's enough for several chickens.

ande likes this

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I may have to give it a go in a controlled experiment.  It sounds like something worth investigating, and lots of details to work out, but if it does work, it could greatly improve sanitation and local food at the same time.

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I was reading about different insect integrations with waste streams and came across this one:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/tmi.12228/pdf

 

So, feeding Black Soldier Fly Larvae fresh human faeces resulted in FCR of 2.0–3.3, which is better than a lot of insects, and better than BSFL on a lot of manures.

Now, they could be sterilized (chemically, like fermentation, or with heat) and fed to animals.  Chickens, in particular, would be a good one for this, maybe dogs, too.  I don't know if I would risk it with fish, but maybe.

An average human excretes 1.1 kg of faeces per day, which could make 330-500 grams of BSF daily! That's enough for several chickens.

 

Hi,

 

I'm a fan of all things BSF.  

 

Are you aware that on the fifth and final instars the larvae empty have no mouthparts and they empty their gut on the climb out of the putrefying wastes that they've fed…..so they're going to be in reasonable shape on the inside.  A quick bath in boiling water would take care of the outside.

 

On the other hand, a humanure toilet would be a safer way to deal with human faeces…..and lot kinder on the the nose.

 

Gary

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yeah, I'm aware of that, but people are squeamish enough if you mention poop and maggots in the same sentence, so had to throw the sterilization line in there.

 

You are right, the humanure toilet is easy and no odor, but Gary, 500 grams of chicken/fish feed a day!!! :)

 

I've used a humanure toilet for going on 15 years, but I like the idea of routing human waste into the loop better than compost.  There's a lot of energy in that stuff.

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There's a lot of energy in that stuff.

 

And some of the most obnoxious diseases of humans, too.  There's a reason that our mouths and backsides are at opposite ends of our bodies.

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And some of the most obnoxious diseases of humans, too.  There's a reason that our mouths and backsides are at opposite ends of our bodies.

 

only with diseased individuals.  Still, I think it can be handled easily enough.  Humanure is one way, earthworm processing another, and BSFL may prove to be another.

Funny that you say that about mouths and backsides, because our primate relative like Gorillas and Chimps regularly eat faeces on purpose, for the B12 content it contains from the gut bacteria.  Nature has a funny way of working things out, sometimes.

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The more I study this subject, the more I am amazed.

When you consider an adult human produces .5 kg (not 1kg like in the OP) of feces a day, and that can produce 165-250g of BSFL a day, you realize real quick that recycling human nutrients could actually feed the human. 165g of BSFL have 60-70g of protein, which is enough for an adult human. Routed through fish or chickens, it will be less, but still, a considerable amount of the protein can be covered by the feces alone.

That's enough protein to feed 5 laying hens. It's enough to produce 15-20 kg of fish every 6 months (which is more than more home based AP systems have). Why are we buying fish feed, again?

Now, we all know the power of urine with the peeponics experiments, so how much of a human's diet could be fertilized/produced from the human's waste?

We may find that 75-90% is not unreasonable. The protein can be covered with the feces, and preliminary research suggests that anywhere between 50-100% of the carbs can be grown with nutrients in urine.  There is a real possibility that with the proper methods and efficient nutrient recycling, home-based food would require very little external input.

 

What would the world look like if we didn't have to grow 90% of the meat and protein that we do today? Human-ponics?

Edited by velacreations (see edit history)
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….only with diseased individuals. 

 

Are you sure about that?  My understanding is that even healthy people carry prospectively dangerous bacteria in their gut.  This belief is reinforced by cultural practices that seek to put mouth and backside at a distance from each other.  Animals that practice copraphagy (e.g.….rabbits, hares and some lemurs) have a gut that is genetically adapted to the practice.  It's why rabbits and hares are off the menu for Muslims and (I think) Jewish people.

 

Hot composting would make human faeces safer….but I think you'd still have a problem telling your in-laws that what was on their dinner plate was grown with human faecal matter.

 

Don't let me get in your road.  If you want to chow down on your own home-grown nuggets, far be it from me to stop you. :wink:

 

BTW…..I wouldn't be guided by chimpanzees when it comes to setting the menu.  I've had a set on them since I learned that they catch and eat other small monkeys.

 

Gary

Edited by Gary Donaldson (see edit history)
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no, you are right, there can be things, like e.coli even in healthy humans.  but diseases have to come from a diseased individual.

 

The Muslims don't know what they are missing, rabbits are my favorite meat aside from bacon (which is in a class of its own).  I don't know if they eat chicken products, but I can tell you, rabbits are considerably cleaner than chickens, even eating their own poop.  Rabbit manure is pretty mild, though, it's really just alfalfa/grass and some undigested grains.  It's actually a decent food for some animals, including many insects (not really BSFL, but mealworms love it)

 

I've been hot composting humanure for 15 years and using it on gardens. I hot compost it, and then let it set for at least a year.  Don't forget, the Chinese farmed with human compost for millennia, and it didn't hurt their population levels much. :)

I don't see it any worse than using any other warm-blooded animal manure that has been properly composted.   Rabbits and chickens can have e.coli, too. Composting is really the best way to kill those pathogens without chemicals, certainly better than septic systems, which pose a serious threat to groundwater supplies.  BSFL seem pretty effective at limiting the spread of pathogens, and produce a higher value product than compost. Soy is about the cheapest protein around, but it's still considerably more expensive than grain, and it has a huge environmental footprint.

 

Pasteurizing the BSFL would be a secure way to make sure nothing gets through.  You could also freeze them, if e.coli was your main concern.  I'm not really sure why any of us are buying protein for our animals with this kind of nutrient available to everyone.  It sure beats depleting the oceans.  I think to make it work well, it just needs a properly designed toilet/outhouse system with a BSF bin, and a careful handling of the pupae to make sure nothing can get transmitted.  Having the BSFL self harvest into a solar pasteurizer is a simple solution, IMO.

 

Has anyone on this forum done peeponics, a quick search didn't return much?  I read TCLynx's thread about it on the backyard AP forum.  Very interesting results with that experiment.  She tested urine, but let it set for a few weeks to change ph and chemically sterilize it. One pee a day kept 1.5 m2 of media grow bed in nutrients, and even then, it was too much at times for the plants.  So, you could easily grow 15 m2 of media bed from the urine from one adult.  No fish to die, considerably less power requirement, probably only need to circulate a few times a day.  I don't know what sort of calories you could produce with space like that, but even in a dirt garden, you can produce more vegetables than one person can eat in that space. I wonder if a peeponics + the sand bed method would work well.  No solids to worry about, either.

 

As far as I can see, this is the most efficient way to produce food.  The external inputs could be minimized to almost zero, as well as energy, and the cost would be pretty low, too, I imagine.

 

This is definitely going on the list of future tests, there's too much potential here for me to ignore it.

 

Humanponics!!

Edited by velacreations (see edit history)
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The trouble with keeping swedes is that they won't stay in the darn cages, they keep getting out and disappearing  :devil:

 

I see you will have to compete with the Japanese that have figured out how to turn feces into steak   http://www.dailytech.com/Japanese+Make+Delicious+Nourishing+Steaks+From+Human+Feces/article21932.htm

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Rota-Loo

human waste is not really a problem with a bit of lateral thinking and good design.

 

I would be leaning toward fertilizing an orchard and a poultry pasture as my priority.

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Hi y2

Rota-Loo

human waste is not really a problem with a bit of lateral thinking and good design.

 

I would be leaning toward fertilizing an orchard and a poultry pasture as my priority.

I have this Snurredass standard - lav, hytte og bolig (3 different sizes low cabin and house) on page 37 in this user/building manual

Brukermanual Monteringsanvisning og brukerveiledning

Mine is not in service, but it's still in the basement. It was in service from -85 to -93, my x-wife could(would) not manage it, so iff/when, I was away (working offshore) all hell broke lose :growl: 

We did have some odor problems in the winters under blackouts iff they lasted more than a day, and people forgot to close the lid.

 

My "problem" was all the rescue missions I had to preform, do to the kids throwing toys or random objects from the bathroom like hairdryer etc. in there :growl: werry exciting game to them, it seems :lolu:

 

They work briliant the odor was do to buildup of urin & poor ventilation, under blackouts in the winter (you need a heating element and a fan) if the load is high, if the tank is in a unheated/uninsulated room inhouse.

 

cheers

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The trouble with keeping swedes is that they won't stay in the darn cages, they keep getting out and disappearing  :devil:

 

I see you will have to compete with the Japanese that have figured out how to turn feces into steak   http://www.dailytech.com/Japanese+Make+Delicious+Nourishing+Steaks+From+Human+Feces/article21932.htm

I'm turning feces into fish and chicken, they can keep their steak! :)

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Rota-Loo

human waste is not really a problem with a bit of lateral thinking and good design.

 

I would be leaning toward fertilizing an orchard and a poultry pasture as my priority.

well, I already do that, but the process of composting loses a lot of nutrients.  It's not efficient at all, but it's the best that most of us have.

Converting feces to grubs to chickens is a direct path that would yield several times more chicken/eggs than going compost > plants> chickens.

We use the simple sawdust humanure toilet, now.  In the past, I have experimented with different methods, including routing through an earthworm bed.  But you need a big earthworm bed to take care of the waste from a family of 4. Still, the worms make better use of the nutrient than composting, that's why it was attractive.

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So... I could do the same with pig manure.  We got rid of pigs a year and a half ago, because the pot belly ones were destroying the pastures. The price of cows has gotten out of sight so we are getting some 'grazing pigs' Gloucestershire Old Spots and Large Black and I wondered what I was going to do with the manure. I doubt the chickens will spread it like with the cow and donkey manure. BSF larvae sounds perfect.  

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So... I could do the same with pig manure.  We got rid of pigs a year and a half ago, because the pot belly ones were destroying the pastures. The price of cows has gotten out of sight so we are getting some 'grazing pigs' Gloucestershire Old Spots and Large Black and I wondered what I was going to do with the manure. I doubt the chickens will spread it like with the cow and donkey manure. BSF larvae sounds perfect.  

My chickens love pig manure.  Pigs are easy to incorporate with BSF, because they generally poop in one area.  There is a lot of information about raising BSFL on pig manure on the internet, Dr Oliver has done a lot of research in Vetinam on that subject.

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the only info i found says there is a 50% reduction in mass after the soldier fly's are done with human waste and this (leftover) was then placed in a long term composting process before garden use.

 

I guess depending on climate, it could be quite a seasonal thing. We would need the flexibility to revert to less efficient processing as the weather cools. A bit like dealing with butchering, offal is easy to deal with in summer but winter rain needs to be prevented from getting on the pile or it just turns to a stinking mess.

 

Wet pig manure would be the same I imagine.

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This thread is hilarious. Reminds me of, think it was California, wanting to compost recyclable "loaded" baby diapers so to sell the compost to gardeners and agriculture. Don't recall if it ever gained traction. ;)

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