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TheDictator

start of sieve filter build

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Been sketching things out a bit but have not started yet.

 

Just keep in mind that the angle of the sieve is what determines if your solids will dump into the PVC pipe or if the solids will eventually just get stuck on the sieve screen.

 

 

I'm just using a 5 gallon bucket, water sealed lid, bucket laying horizontally, top 1/3 of bucket cut out. PVC tube glued in place. Sieve screen laying on this large sloted tube (like you show) using the buckets top to hold it at an angle. Uniseals for PVC output to RFF.

 

Also, you do not have to use such a large sieve piece. My sketch involves the sieve screen to be only about 4" tall, except it will be about 18" wide. Keeping the PVC tube and sieve at a significant decline so to ensure the solids dump with the force of water pushing the solids down the tube. Yet, still allowing significant amount of water to exit through the sieve screen.

 

 

Remember, the water exiting the sieve from the solid waste effluent output will have very little gravity pressure behind it to push through the RFF.

 

This waste effluent output then dumps into a very small RFF, which this is where you will have to be clever with your RFF design and best explain if I scanned/uploaded my sketch.  RFF still doable while maintaining the baffle effect to reduce turbulance and increase settlement, such as is done in a RFF. You will just have to think how the water from the sieve enters the RFF and if a curved pedestal is necessary.

Edited by crsublette (see edit history)

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Hi Charles,

 

yes I have given this quite some thought but have yet to decide on how to handle the solids. 

I have allowed for a adjustment so I can change the angle of the sieve and to be able to adjust the length of the PVC pipe from the fish tanks.

 

Since this is the first one I am making I will experiment with it. I have pretty much already given up on the idea of using a RFF, it just doesn't make sense to me. I am more so interested in seeing how long it will take for say a 5 gallon bucket to fill up with solids and water. If I do it right perhaps I can get very little water and mostly solids to collect in the collection bucket.

 

Any pictures you have Charles would be cool if you posted them here.

 

Cheers!

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At best, the height differential between the fish tank water line and gravity flow filtration will only be about 4~6 inches rather than 12 inches or more.

 

Depending on how much sieve screen elevation angle you use.

Yeah I will figure all this out. Once I do I can decide on cutting down the sieve I have to perhaps two and use the other one else where.. Step one is to make it and see what happens.

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I have allowed for a adjustment so I can change the angle of the sieve and to be able to adjust the length of the PVC pipe from the fish tanks.

 

I would also look into making an adjustment where you can change the vertical placement of the PVC pipe or the pipe hitting the screen.

 

 

If I do it right perhaps I can get very little water and mostly solids to collect in the collection bucket.

 

Well, water is what is responsible for pushing the solids down the sieve screen. If you use too little water exiting along with the solids, then more likely the solids will just build up on the sieve screen, until hopefully a big enough pile forms so to suddenly slide down the screen into the waste output pipe. This is the main problem with many sieve devices, that is many designs still eventually involve some manual input to push the solids down the screen; however, the sieves I see not required manual intervention has a noticeable amount of water going down the sieve with the solids.

 

To get a good idea, look at the many pond videos of sieve screen devices in action.

 

You will eventually see what I am talking about. :)

 

 

 I am more so interested in seeing how long it will take for say a 5 gallon bucket to fill up with solids and water.

 

Yep, instead of a RFF, you could do this as well and use a very very small waste effluent sump pump that uses a high-water level switch to turn ON the sump then the sump turns OFF when water level becomes low. Then these chopped up solids would get automatically pushed into mineralization tank

 

 

Any pictures you have Charles would be cool if you posted them here.

 

Will take me some time, but will do.

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You will not have to cut your sieve screen if you change the height differential of the PVC waste tube or the water input PVC tube so to have the SLO/BD water splashed exactly where you want it to splash.

 

There will be alot of unused sieve screen if it is not cut, which is fine, but at least you can place the water where you want it to be placed.

Edited by crsublette (see edit history)

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Charles,

I know what you are talking about.. I am just talking about balancing that flow as to minimize needed water to move solids.. Perhaps we are talking about the exact same thing ;)

 

I have thought of the high water level float switch to turn on a pump. Haven't gotten that far yet though.. Don't want to do something before I know what else might need to be changed.. I am in the process of "building to see what happens mode" :)

 

I really hope this thing works really well so I can cut down on time cleaning bags, filter media etc etc.. 

Edited by SwedeAquaponics (see edit history)

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You will not have to cut your sieve screen if you change the height differential of the PVC waste tube or the water input PVC tube so to have the SLO/BD water splashed exactly where you want it to splash.

 

There will be alot of unused sieve screen if it is not cut, which is fine, but at least you can place the water where you want it to be placed.

Oh yeah, It is in the plan to use different angles/heights etc etc.. I will play around with it!

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What I never understood is where do the solids go?  Do they fall off into some kind of container?  If so, how do you make sure no water gets in there, even from splashing, etc...

 

Do they go to the bottom of the filter container with the water?  If so, how do they settle with the water constantly splashing around?

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What I never understood is where do the solids go?  Do they fall off into some kind of container?  If so, how do you make sure no water gets in there, even from splashing, etc...

 

Do they go to the bottom of the filter container with the water?  If so, how do they settle with the water constantly splashing around?

This is what we have been discussing above.

 

You can increase the amount of water that goes out through the bottom collection pipe by raising the angle on the sieve. Or lay the sieve more flat with the risk of most of the solids collection on the sieve screen..

 

I have never built one so this will be a lot of testing. 

 

here is a video I used for ideas of my build 

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I've built a bunch of sieve/screen filters. They are great.

You'll probably end up wanting to upgrade your mesh screen to wedge wire eventually. The mesh tends to clog up pretty quickly with bio film. Also, the water doesn't have the same flow characteristics. With mesh, the water tends to want to "cling" to the screen as it falls down the slope, going over the screen rather than through it. With wedge wire, it tends to flow through rather than over the screen.

Wedge wire is far superior, but it's expensive stuff.

Another tip, with wedge wire you can just let the solids sit on the screen, and they'll push down the slope slowly as they accumulate. For this reason, I quit designing mine to have a solids collector at the bottom. I just use a shop vac every couple of days to vacuum the solids off the screen, and once a week or so, I'll hit the screen with the power washer for a few seconds, which keeps it running perfectly. By operating it this way, the solids removed remain relatively dry (basically the consistency of mush), instead of in a water/solids soupy mess. This makes the solids much easier to work with, for whatever I choose to use them for at any particular time.

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I've built a bunch of sieve/screen filters. They are great.

You'll probably end up wanting to upgrade your mesh screen to wedge wire eventually. The mesh tends to clog up pretty quickly with bio film. Also, the water doesn't have the same flow characteristics. With mesh, the water tends to want to "cling" to the screen as it falls down the slope, going over the screen rather than through it. With wedge wire, it tends to flow through rather than over the screen.

Wedge wire is far superior, but it's expensive stuff.

Another tip, with wedge wire you can just let the solids sit on the screen, and they'll push down the slope slowly. For this reason, I quit designing mine to have a solids collector at the bottom. I just use a shop vac every couple of days to vacuum the solids off the screen, and once a week or so, I'll hit the screen with the power washer for a few seconds, which keeps it running perfectly.

Hi kellen,

thanks for the advice. Do you mind sharing where you get your wedge wire from?

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I got mine from Chris at Allied Aqua. He custom builds them from time to time. The two of us built the one I'm using now in fact (he did most of the work on this one though...hehe). He usually has some wedge wire in inventory, and has sold a few cut pieces to people on the forum. I have no idea if he is still willing to sell pieces or not, but you might try contacting him to see. Fair warning though, it's very expensive. It should outlast you though. :)

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I got mine from Chris at Allied Aqua. He custom builds them from time to time. The two of us built the one I'm using now in fact (he did most of the work on this one though...hehe). He usually has some wedge wire in inventory, and has sold a few cut pieces to people on the forum. I have no idea if he is still willing to sell pieces or not, but you might try contacting him to see. Fair warning though, it's very expensive. It should outlast you though. :)

Any pictures of your sieve or a link here on the forum?

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Any pictures of your sieve or a link here on the forum?

Not of my current one, but here's a really old prototype of a smaller unit that I co-designed and built with Chris. At one time we were thinking about building them and selling them, but it never materialized as we were both too busy with other commitments.

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Not of my current one, but here's a really old prototype of a smaller unit that I co-designed and built with Chris. At one time we were thinking about building them and selling them, but it never materialized as we were both too busy with other commitments.

I cant watch the video..It says its private :(

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