HOW

What Species Do I Have Here?

32 posts in this topic

If he has a Striper in his pond, that would be the only thing in the pond.

OOps wrong classification. Looks like a smallmouth to me. But then the striped bass would be what I imagine a brim/crappie cross to look like.

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Kellan,

 

While in most cases I would agree with you, if you consider where Mike lives, anything would be possible. Due to issues from our local Tritium plant, various nuclear power facilities and pollutant causing manufacturing facilities, weird crossings and mutations do occur.

 

In my years here, I have seen with my own eyes, a three foot tall squirrel, an eight pound green sunfish and even pygmy black bears.

 

8 pound GSF.  LOL.

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If he has a Striper in his pond, that would be the only thing in the pond.

 

I have a couple of stripers in my pond, and about a dozen or so hybrid striped bass (white bass x striped bass) as well.  No worries. :)

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The largest pond I have spans little over an acre. This pond has brim catfish and base. We nicknamed the pond the gator pond because once an alligator lived there. Before the gator "left" he took out most of the catfish. My uncles later restocked pond with shellcracker redbreast ginea brim crappie whatever kind of brim relatives they caught from nearby lakes and rivers. Just saying this could lead to lonely crappie hooking up with a desperate brim. Lol talpia are related to cichlids I believe. Even if not cichlids 1000s of different kinds live on one area naturally commonly crossing and becoming new kinds of cichlids. Lol probably little off on major details but my point is natural crosses happen often in nature it's probably type of micro process in evolution.

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Crappie are in the same "family" (Centrarchidae) as the sunfishes but are in a different genus entirely, not just species. While there are certainly some occasional examples of natural cross-genus hybridization in some organisms (including fish), it's generally quite rare, outside of labs and using artificial gamete collection and fertilization techniques.  Add to this that crappie (Pomoxis) and the common sunfishes (Lepomis) spawn at different times  and have very different water temperature preferences for spawning, it makes it even less likely that they would be in spawn at the same time, since gamete (sperm/egg) maturation occurs at distinctly different times, in natural settings.  Crappie are late winter/early spring spawners while sunfish are generally summer spawners.  With that said, white crappie and bluegill have been successfully hybridized through artificial means.  However, the F1 offspring were not reproductively viable and had extremely high lethality.  Encountering such a hybrid in the "wild" would be like finding a 100 pound gold nugget... not technically "impossible", but so unlikely to consider it a practical impossibility.

 

Now, all those different Lepomis your uncle bucket stocked in the pond... They can, and fairly frequently do, cross breed.  This can cause all sorts of interesting looking sunfish, some of which could quite possibly take on a somewhat "crappie like" appearance.

 

Hope that helps.

mortys likes this

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Kellen you have been so helpful with crappie knowledge lol makes me wanna catch more brim from my pond and verify possible crosses. Makes me also want to create more situations that crosses could occur easier in simi-control environments. The quest continues 😄

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