ABF

Vermiculture worms for Aquaponics....

31 posts in this topic

Any thoughts on sticking a PVC pipes into the soil to provide extra ventilation?

I've heard of farmers who use this approach. They are composting manure in large storage containers and run lots of pipes through to provide aeration. That way they don't have to turn it.

Don't see why it wouldn't work to some degree in a worm bin.

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Basically I would drill holes in a PVC pipe all the way down then drive it into the soil top exposed above the dirt. That way it would pretty much work like a vent. Not sure how well it would work though.

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Hi ABF

 

Any thoughts on sticking a PVC pipes into the soil to provide extra ventilation?

 A study on the matter The Myth of Root Snorkels: "Low-oxygen root zones can be aerated by installing vertical aeration tubes"

here:

http://www.google.no/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=3&ved=0CDQQFjAC&url=http%3A%2F%2Fpuyallup.wsu.edu%2F~linda%2520chalker-scott%2FHorticultural%2520Myths_files%2FMyths%2FRoot%2520snorkels.pdf&ei=POrrU-XlIKm6ygOgrYKgDQ&usg=AFQjCNGiTVEfrqRwjsjV9DuxabHJaNgFfg&bvm=bv.72938740,d.bGQ

 

cheers

ABF likes this

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Okay, thank you.  I think I understand what you were planning on doing.  I am so sorry, but the term “soil†threw me off a bit.  I thought that somehow you were planning on running a PVC pipes from the tub drain down into the soil under the tub…and just could not wrap my brain around any other mental image….

    To be clear, I hope you are not adding any soil into your vermicomposting containers.  It is unnecessary.  Redworms do not live in a soil environment.  They do best in just the organic matter they are meant to process, maybe adding some peat moss or coco coir if you like, to help with moisture management. I am figuring by "soil" you were referring to the worm castings and other matter in the vermicomposting container.

      I believe Jean Pain (French inventor – big on compost based energy), master of heating with massive composting mounds, utilizes some air venting in some of his piles to aid in the processes at work there.  It is possible that adding some PVC pipes into your  tub to help with ventilation in the middle of the vermicomposting mass may help…but if you are worried about ventilation, I would consider drilling holes in the side of the tub (hopefully it is not a cast iron tub).  PVC pipes in the matter in the bin may work, but will also be a place where moisture/water will pool, and worms will hole-up – and plug things up- and also unless screened, flies ad unwanted pests could enter the vermicomposting mass.  Try it, it could work.  But screen the tops of the pipes.  It would be better to drill the sides of the tub though, with pencil eraser diam.-sized holes.  Be sure the tub sits up off the ground.  Put the pegs/legs in tuna cans of water to form a moat which will keep unwanted bugs out.

  Interesting read in the article linked in the previous post.  The last sentence in paragraph 5 of the article applies here. “It appears that passive aeration of root zones is not  effective in anything but container trees.† The tub IS a container.  Keep in mind that in vermicomposting we are not attempting to grow any plants.  ABF’s goal  with the suggestion of PVC pipes here is to provide an avenue to aeration  to avoid anaerobic pockets in the tub. This is a worthy goal since drilling  side holes in a tub, depending on the material it is made from, may be difficult, if not impossible.

 

  Hope this input is encouraging and helpful.

 

- Converse

ande likes this

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Hi

Found some good articles on here http://www.caryinstitute.org/keywords/earthworms

I did't know, that most of the worms of north america originated in europe  The invasion of the crawlers

Also this article, Earthworms increase soils' greenhouse gas emissionswas a different take or view on earthworms,to me

 

cheers

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Converse,

I have recently bought a horse boarding business. We currently have about 30 horses boarded, so, needless to say, i have a lot of manure and bedding on my hands. I would like to use worms to help deal with the pile. Can you take pictures of and explain your system? How much input do you add a day and how does that look? I read you use winrows, but how is that managed and how do you collect worm castings? Thanks for the great discussion.

 

Jens

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