bigdaddy

Sous Vide

36 posts in this topic

Hi everyone,

 

Anyone know what sous vide is?...

 

For those who don't, it's French for under vacuum...

 

Sous vide cooking has been practiced for years in many restaurants around the world for years but not much domestically until maybe the last 5 years or so in Australia...

 

The reason for this is the equipment has not been practical to purchase domestically...

 

The equipment required is a recirculating water oven set up, vacuum sealer and food quality vacuum sealer bags and a skillet, frypan or searing pan of some kind...

 

Today Sous vides are commonly available in department stores and so are vacuum sealers and bags...

 

Well I've been investigating sous vide cooking for the last 18 months and figured it was to expensive for me to set up at home until yesterday...

 

I bought  a Breville Sous vide supreme and replaced my vacuum sealer all on super duper specials... I am wrapped....My wife has given me the customary roasting but I'm happy...

 

I had a flat out yesterday and yesterday night so today I unboxed them both, defrosted some marinated chicken 1/2s, bagged them up and into the sous vide at 80 degrees fro 4 hours....

 

The boss did some special cashew dakah potatoes and I did some other veges seared the chicken and had it for dinner...I've got to report it was yuuuuum...Very nice, some Cascade apple cider and I had a happy family :)....

 

I hope this is not another fad, hopefully I give it some good use...

 

The vacuum sealed lamb shanks are defrosted now, ready to go into the sous vide at 6am tomorrow morning for a 36 hr cook...Now I'll see if it's as good for helping with saving time as they say it is...

 

Is there anyone out there doing sous vide?...

 

Cheers.

Edited by bigdaddy (see edit history)
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Nice bigdaddy! I hope you continue to enjoy this process. I haven't experienced it, nor have a home setup (my wife is the chef anyway), but have seen it on the Food Network. I was under the impression that it was a quick process, only cooking for minutes as opposed to the hours that you mention.

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Hi everyone,

 

Here's my lamb shanks Sous vide attempt...

 

They were cooked in a sous vide water oven for 37-38 hours...At 72 C

 

I have never cooked shanks this way before, but I purchased them already vacuum sealed so I didn't add any seasoning , herbs, etc before hand like the recipe suggests...But being a foodie type of guy, I don't always do what the recipe suggests..I've been known to enhance somewhat. No flavour added rather I added the natural gelatin fluid in the bags to my home made onion gravy along with my mixture of herbs and spices at the end...

 

I could taste the flavour of the meat more, that along with the gravy and separately cooked veges made for an excellent winter meal...The meat literally fell of the bone...

 

Enjoy....

 

Cheers.

post-559-0-10714800-1405469765_thumb.jpg

Edited by bigdaddy (see edit history)

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I've been toying with sous vide a little.  Done lamb, roo, rabbit, duck eggs, duck and fish so far...

 

flathead and silver perch cam out good

rabbit was the most tender I've ever eaten

duck eggs were creamier than custard

lamb was a bit chewy

duck was very chewy

roo was a bit over done and seemed to have lost flavour compared to a quick session on the bbq plate

 

Getting temp and time right can be critical for some types of meats - still yet to find the sweet spot for lamb ribs and roo, not tried shank yet, though I reckon it would be good.  Got a couple of sous vide books which are of some help, though sometimes a bit noncy for my liking.

 

I'm using a diy sous vide controller (STC1000) hooked up to a slow cooker with no water pump so may not have super stable temps, though it only seems to vary by 1 degs, but may have more variation across the water depth in stagnant areas.  may retrofit a small 12v dc pump to it.

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Hi Matt,

 

I'm using a diy sous vide controller (STC1000) hooked up to a slow cooker with no water pump so may not have super stable temps, though it only seems to vary by 1 degs, but may have more variation across the water depth in stagnant areas.  may retrofit a small 12v dc pump to it.

 

Love it!

 

I have no experience of sous vide cooking.   How is it better than ordinary slow cooking?

 

Gary

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Hi Matt,

 

Maybe you cooked the lamb at a temp that was too high and the also with the duck and roo...The duck may of been keep in the bath for too long as well..Interesting comment, it seemed to of lost lost some of it's flavour compared to Barby cooking...

 

I've only got the book that came with the machine but look a bit up online which also helps...

 

Hooking a small pump up may help but if you are doing it inside be careful about the noise..That could be annoying...Maybe a small quiet battery operated aerator with an airstone attached will help too, but a bit noisier and evaporation may be increased...

 

I know what you are saying about noncy stuff, but hey sometimes it's OK, other times it's a load of rubbish...The good thing about this, as with aquaponics, you can be as plain or fancy as you like, providing you consistently stick to the basic principles... 

 

Hi Gary, 

 

This is what I have,

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SousVide_Supreme#mediaviewer/File:Sous_vide_supreme.tif

 

So far I'm enjoying it...

 

Then again I'm the type of guy who likes this type of thing...I've been down the modern cuisine/ molecular gastronomy ( some don't like that phrase) road before, and it won't take much to get back onto it...

 

I had a look at DIY, Immersion circulators, kick start campains' with a particular immersion circulator, domestic and commercial water baths........

 

A couple of years ago, I thought this machine would be nice but availability put me off along with the expense...

 

I saw this on special recently, so I grabbed it...Along with my new vacuum sealer...

 

The difference between conventional slow cooking and sous vide cooking is in sou vide, you are cooking food in a bag, so the flavours, and nutrients etc are circulating in the bag and permeating the food...Because it's being cooked at lower temps over longer periods of time in some cases and it's all contained in a bag the food is claimed to be more flavoursome and juicy....The other reason why this is the case is, you don't get the exchange of fluids like you get in conventional slow cooking...

 

I like the different flavours you can get over the whole meal...I've found in slow cooking, which I like, You get the same flavour going right through all the food in the pot...In sous vide, you can (if you are organised and get the times and temps right) you can cook meat in it's own juices and whatever you add, then veges can be cooked in their own juices and whatever you add as they are in a separate bag...Well that's the theory...I'm yet to get to this stage...I'm still learning and experimenting with different meats and about to try eggs.

 

I tried my rump steak last night and messed it up a bit...The meal and steak were still nice but not quite how we like it...

The meat came out well done...We like it medium rare...I know what I did wrong...I didn't take into account the thickness of my steak when setting the temps...It was relatively thin cut, maybe 14mm (9/16") I cooked it at a temperature that was a bit to high..Next time I'll drop the temperature down 4 degrees or so...Lesson learnt...With sous vide cooking, it works on the thickness of the steak...

 

Even when the steak was well done , it still was more flavoursome, and I think more juicy, then a well done steak cooked conventionally..

 

Oh well, lucky I'm happy to experiment, critique and adjust my cooking...I think if you are going to invest in this type of cooking you have to be prepared to do that...

 

As for the "set and forget" claims...Yeah, to a large extent...You do need to be mindful of what you are cooking and what you have done and are doing though...With the steak you do need to spend a few minutes searing the steak, at the end, and off course, as per usual, making the gravy...If you like gravy...

 

Looking further ahead, I think I will use this a lot in the winter time...I'm not sure, but suspect I'll use it less, a lot less in the summer time...We'll see about that one..

 

Cheers.

Edited by bigdaddy (see edit history)

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Hi BD,

thought you might be interested in this sous vide style eggs.

 

I have seen Heston Blumen-long-name and Simon Bryant do some stuff on the scientific theory behind cooking proteins, carbohydrates and sugars and why things happen at certain temperatures, very interesting stuff.

 

What about a corned silverside? That is something I just cant get right with a conventional method. I get the two extremes, little pockets of gristle or poor flavour and smell.

 

One of the thing I have seen is the vacuum sleeves cut longer than needed so that they can be opened and resealed and reused. ie, to cut a section from a large block of cheese and reseal it a number of times

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Hi Yahoo,

 

I did poached eggs twice now...The first time I had runny whites...But they were still superb

 

The second time I increased the emp by 0.5 degree then I read your article you posted and finished them off for a few seconds in hotter water on the stove and I nailed it...Now I have to repeat the process every time I cook the eggs...

 

Thanks for posting the article ...It helped me a lot...

 

Corned silverside is on the to do list in the near future...

 

Tonight I'm doing potatoes, carrots beans prawns and salmon....

 

Cheers.

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Glad to hear it, I have had a bit of a nose around that blog and there are quite a few interesting articles, one about pork chops I found particularly good. Plus an article about a clamp on sous vide circulator/heater from anova that is to be released at the end of the year.

 

I can vouch for how much difference good temperature control makes, I had a play with a friends induction cooktop a couple of months ago, on things like scrambled eggs it just runs rings around my old electric cooktop.

 

I know what you mean about fiddling around with an extra cooking step and using another saucepan it seems to go against the grain. One step one pot cooking appeals to our thrifty-ness, but then so many of the classic recipes use combinations of hob and oven and different temperatures so we probably should just get over it.

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Here we go...

 

Went a bit fancy for dinner tonight....

 

This is my first attempt of doing a whole main course in my sous vide...

 

Food cooked

 

Lemon and thyme salmon cooked with garlic potatoes, honey carrots and brocoli

 

Ingredients

 

Prawns

Salmon

Potatoes

Carrots

Brocoli

Manuka honey

Thyme

Garlic 

Olive oil

Pepper 

Salt

 

Cooks notes: Salmon needed to be cooked well done as prawns needed a slightly higher temperature

The potatoes were finished in a very hot oven 250C for 5 mins

The salmon was browned off with a cooks blow torch.

 

Cooks critique:

 

Salmon was absolutely beautiful, you could taste the added thyme and lemon

Prawns were spot on

The garlics potatoes were beautiful

The honey carrots were lovely

The broccoli was slightly overcooked for our liking.

 

I totally enjoyed our meal Looking forward to using the sous vide again and streamlining the vacuum part, ie not to hard on the fish ..It looks odd with the indent of a slice of lemon on it, and cooking times with the veges...

 

This sounds more complicated than what it is. But all you need to do, is be organised at the beginning of the  meal, and precise with your temps and cook times.

I know it takes a little bit of sorting to get it perfect but even when you don't do it perfect the food does indeed taste moist and flavoursome...

 

Cheers.

post-559-0-79705700-1405939558_thumb.jpg

post-559-0-98553100-1405939583_thumb.jpg

Edited by bigdaddy (see edit history)

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Recently I added Rump lamb to my list of lovely food cooked sous vide and it was lovely...Today I made hamburgers bigdaddy style and have added them to the list...I thought I could cook them on the barbie just as well for this one...I'll cook them again sous vide but next time the temp and times will be lower...

Cheers

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Has anyone tried sous vide since our last post?

I did lamb shanks recently again and they were spot on...This time I rubbed them with a generous amount of olive oil...Rubbed salt all around them...Into the sous vide bag...Fresh sprigs of thyme added...Vacuum sealed and into the water bath at 72 C for 24 hrs... Shanks out juices from shanks used to make gravy...make sure you strain juices well and take as much fat off the liquid as possible...Steam veges seperately mash potatoes and there we have it...Another beautiful meal...

Cheers.

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It has been baby steps in that direction for me. I have been trying to buy an Anova Precision Cooker. They launched it on kickstarter and have sold out of the ones with the Australian plug every batch that they have produced before I get an order in.

 

I cooked silverside in a benchtop pressure cooker this week, I got it up to temperature on the simmer setting then turned it back to the "keep warm" setting and left it overnight. I think the temp was still to high, it still lost some juice but it is the best I have produced yet. No gristle or sinew and a beautiful aroma and flavour.

A whole chicken is a work in progress, I have been told to try a brine solution in the fridge overnight. 60grams of salt to every litre of water to help the bird retain moisture. then it is into a fan forced oven at 70 C for 3.5-4 hours. After that it is rested, then skin is browned on high. I have lost my temp probe, so I will have to wait till I have a new one before trying it.

 

A trick I picked up from a Chinese chef, she drains any liquid out and rinses out the cavity and neck of ducks with a small amount of rice wine before she starts preparing them. I guess the acid and the booze kill some bacteria and wash away any contamination and taint smell from processing. I think its a good idea when low temp cooking poultry.

 

I keep forgetting to ask, Is big daddy a drag racing reference?

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Hi everyone,

 

Recently I also sous vided if that's a word LOL the Rolls Royce of Beef, fillet steak...

 

I asked the butcher to cut it into restaraunt cuts enough for my family and he also cryovaced it for me...This meant I could put it into my fridge without freezing it and keep it there till I was ready...

 

I set the Sous vide machine to 60 C (Medium rare for us).... and when I was ready put it straight into the water bath for 2 hrs 50 mins ...This allowed me time to go to the vege shop buy my veges  prepare and cook them in time for when the meat finished plus do the other shopping...

 

One of the good things about sous vide cooking is It doesn't smell out your home...Actually... There is no smell from the cooked meat as it is all contained in the plastic pouch...I must admit this is a most convenient way to cook your meat...

 

I finished the meat by removing the juices from the pouch and patting the meat dry with a paper towel then browning the meat of with a blow torch...No not the Oxy Acetylene a hand held one lol....I used the strained  juices of the meat to make gravy...Let the meat rest for a while and put it all together...I loved it...IMO there was nothing wrong and everything right with the meal...

 

I've browned the meat with a blow torch and a very very hot pan and I think finishing it off in a hot pan tastes a fraction better...You don't get that ever so slightly smokey flavour going through the meat IMO..

 

There we go Yahoo there's something to try when you get your sous vide set up...

 

I've tried pressure cooking things and that's a very good way to cook good flavoursome meat for pies and stews etc It does it quickly if you want...I never set it to keep warm overnight though might try that now you've mentioned how to do it...

 

Oh and No Bigdaddy is not a drag racing reference...;)

 

Cheers.

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Hi BD

Hi everyone,


One of the good things about sous vide cooking is It doesn't smell out your home...Actually... There is no smell from the cooked meat as it is all contained in the plastic pouch...I must admit this is a most convenient way to cook your meat...


Cheers.

 

Haha I love the smell or rather cents of cooking :bbq:   it sharpens the apetit :D makes you hungry :)

 

your post also makes me hungry :lolu:

 

cheers

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There we go Yahoo there's something to try when you get your sous vide set up...

 

I've tried pressure cooking things and that's a very good way to cook good flavoursome meat for pies and stews etc It does it quickly if you want...I never set it to keep warm overnight though might try that now you've mentioned how to do it...

 

 

Thanks BD,

the only reason I have used this pressure cooker is that it has really good temperature control. The idea has progressed from my experience using a recipe for a Master stock Chinese poached chicken. The idea is to get the whole chicken in the poaching liquid to a simmer for 5 - 10 minutes then switch it off, with the lid on leave it to cook through from the retained heat in the liquid for anything from 1 to 3 hours. The pressure cooker i have can handle a big chook and is well insulated so its pretty foolproof with this method.

 

I cant find my original stock recipe, I tend to ad-lib with the ingredients depending on how salty the soy is or what chinese wine I have or what the old master stock looks like when I get it out of the freezer. Its very similar to Kylie Kwong's drunken chicken I tend to use less salty soy and cut back on the sugar.

 

Pretty sure you are right, getting the outside of the steak dry is the key to forming a good searing crust, with moisture the temperature wont get higher than 100 C until it is boiled off, that means stewed not seared. What about a preheated pan in a smokin hot oven for searing a very thick steak or lamb chunk? sort of like a grilled finishing step.

Edited by yahoo2 (see edit history)

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Hi,

 

Before this thread started, I hadn't heard about Sous Vide as a cooking method.  Some time back, I saw a Hog's Breath Cafe ad that mentioned that they slow-cooked their prime rib steaks for 18 hours and I couldn't understand how that would work.

 

This thread - and some googling - and I now understand.  

 

I can also see how it might allow a carnivore with mediocre cooking skills (like me) to produce passable results.  I'm getting interested.

 

Gary

Edited by Gary Donaldson (see edit history)
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Did lamb shanks at 80 degs C for 24 hours on friday - very good, though was tricky to brown as it was all so soft and stuck to the BBQ plate.  Think a blowtorch may have been better...

 

Its also a very handy form of cooking Gary - if you are prepared in advance you can just chuck some prepacked stuff from the freezer into the SV machine and come back a day later to very tasty food.

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Did lamb shanks at 80 degs C for 24 hours on friday - very good, though was tricky to brown as it was all so soft and stuck to the BBQ plate.  Think a blowtorch may have been better...

 

Its also a very handy form of cooking Gary - if you are prepared in advance you can just chuck some prepacked stuff from the freezer into the SV machine and come back a day later to very tasty food.

 

Just so happens that I luv lamb shanks.

 

I'm old enough to remember when they were dog food…..like most of the tastiest cuts of meat……so I resent the fact that they are now trendy and you have to mortgage the house to buy them.

 

Gazing into my crystal ball, I can see a sous vide machine in my not-too-distant future.

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Mine is nothing fancy, a diy stc1000 controller a box a socket and a slow cooker. Also do my yoghurt in it :-)

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Mine is nothing fancy, a diy stc1000 controller a box a socket and a slow cooker. Also do my yoghurt in it :-)

 

Got any pictures of your set up?  We've already got the slow cooker. 

 

I've heard mention of the STC-1000 electronic temperature controller in other areas (home-brewing if I recall correctly).  Where did you get yours from?

 

Gary

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Not got any pics, though its basically along the lines of this:

http://makezine.com/projects/water-bath-thermostat/

 

I bought it for $30 from a guy on gumtree so saved myswlf the hassle of putting it together!  You can get better controllers (PID) that keep the temp more constant - this one is +/- 1 deg C which is fine for me, though some SV purists think that is not accurate enough.

 

I'm not the pure thankfully :)

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Thanks Matt…..I have a clear idea of what you're doing now.

 

I'll have to take a closer look at PID controllers, too.  We have lots of situations where the sort of accuracy offered by the STC-1000 would be useful.  The only one that would require greater accuracy than that would be poultry incubators.  With those, I like to work in tenths of a degree…..and, in that application, fractions of a degree do make a difference.

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Hi Everyone,

 

I looked at that and it's the PID I'd get if I wanted to go that way...You could add a little aerator to the pot to circulate the water...Just keep an eye on the evaporation or better still a tiny water pump... With the aerator you'd have to set up everything up outside because of the noise...

Personally The Anova would suit me better...But my Sous Vide Supreme.Is the ants pants...It's silent, large and looks nice...Very mice... I did keep my eye open everywhere for a good couple of years before it came onto a very good special..

Just a teaser

I did the most beautiful roast the other night.

Photos and description to come...

Cheers

Edited by bigdaddy (see edit history)

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Hey BD......what is a good price for a Breville unit like yours.....and who ran the special on it?  The list price is $499.00.

 

I've been googling sous vide to death and, the more I see, the better I like the idea.   The impression I get is that it's easy to do, it's healthy (since everything cooks in its own juices/marinades) and the food is moist.  

 

The last one is a big thing for me.  My saliva glands haven't recovered since my little misadventure last year and I really struggle to eat anything that's dry.  Chicken breast, roast lamb and pork are examples of foods that I can only eat if I wash it down.

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