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craig1267

Fried rice with onions and quail eggs

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Since I get so many quail eggs, I often have to come up with different ways to incorporate them into recipes.  Here is a fun one that is pretty quick and easy.

 

What you need:
white rice

fish sauce

salt

chopped garlic

chopped onion

quail eggs

 

So you take some basic old white rice and cook it until it's soft, just like you would normally do.  You can also use dirty rice if you wish, but it isn't much different in terms of starch content.  So personally, I'd stick with white rice here and then experiment as you want with more whole grain varieties if you like.  Just remember that grains will have a much stronger taste, and will drown out everything else.  This is a way to make use of white rice, which I find pretty boring...and of course your endless supply of quail eggs :)  You can use any egg as far as I'm concerned.

 

First make regular white rice.  I cook it on the stove in water with a pinch of salt.  Once that is done you probably want to get another pot. Chop up an onion in there.  Mince it -- not long slices.  My preference here is for yellow onion.  Put in some butter, or oil, or bacon fat and start cooking them down.  I tend to use a decently high fire and keep stirring.  You don't want to brown the onions, but just wait until they are translucent.

 

Next dump the rice in.  Keep that heat up on medium-high.  Mix everything up and take a good look at the rice to make sure it has a small coating of fat or oil.  If you find that the rice sucked up whatever was left, add a little bit more.  Keep stirring the rice/onion mixture around because the fire is pretty hot, and with just a little oil/fat in the mix it will burn quickly.  

 

The rice will start to slowly change color from very white to slightly off white.  At this point I add in my chopped garlic, and perhaps a little salt.  Keep stirring for a bit.

 

The rice will continue to darken and the onions will slowly start to brown.  You'll see that around the edges of the onion bits.  Add in maybe a teaspoon or two of fish sauce.  You'll have to judge this because it's pretty strong stuff.  Since the heat is up though, some of it will immediately boil off, so you'll have to potentially add in some more for taste.  After you add it, keep stirring.

 

I normally use a regular pot with sides so that when I stir I don't accidentally shoot some of the rice over the side The professionals will use a wok of some sort.  I can't honestly tell you why or what difference this makes...

 

At this point the rice will start to look brown.  If you take a taste, you'll be able to taste a good mix of browned onion, which normally have a sweetish flavor.  This, however, will be cancelled out by the fish sauce which is rather hard to describe, but it's a good combination.  Since the rice is cooked, it won't take in too much of the surrounding taste, but it will take in some, which is just enough in my opinion.  At this point I add in a little more fish sauce, then I take some quail eggs and just crack them and break them directly in the pot.

 

To easily open quail eggs, I put them on a flat surface, then use a decent size knife with a heavy handle and give the size of the egg a whack.  This puts a slit in the egg, which then you can use your fingers to just pull the shell apart.  

 

I add in maybe 4 or 5 quail eggs, stirring every time.  This breaks up the egg as it fries, which happens almost instantly, into the mix.  Stir up a bit more, and take off the heat. Add in some salt if you like.  The fish sauce will be your primary source of salt, so you might not want any more.  You decide.

Edited by craig1267 (see edit history)

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Hi Craig,

 

I normally use a regular pot with sides so that when I stir I don't accidentally shoot some of the rice over the side The professionals will use a wok of some sort.  I can't honestly tell you why or what difference this makes...

 

The benefits of a wok are that it can be made in any village workshop.....at a very low price......and that it transfers heat quickly to the food that it contains.

 

A lot of Asian cookery relies on high heat for a short duration.....and a wok is perfect for this.

 

Regardless of what you cooked it in, your fried rice sounds like something that I'd enjoy.

 

Gary

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