velacreations

Mushroom biofilter?

82 posts in this topic

Great thread! I've started growing oyster mushrooms in modified aquaponic flood and drain grow beds. A Florida strain seems perfect for my present Chinese solar greenhouse conditions.


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Edited by Jackal (see edit history)
ande likes this

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 they look great.   What sort of depth do you flood the bed to?  And do you allow the inoculated bed to fully colonize before starting to flood it with ap water?   

Jackal likes this

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Great questions! This is my first time trying to colonize and fruit in a flood and drain grow bed. The bed has a geotextile barrier over grow media so that it floods about two inches over the barrier layer. On top of the barrier layer is a bulk substrate layer inoculated with Florida oyster mushroom spawn. During the spawn run, the bed is drained and with flood and drain turned off. My thoughts were that the mycelium would not colonize a flooded substrate. After the substrate is fully colonized and starting to pin, will turn on the flood and drain so that that bottom two inches or so of the colonized substrate get flooded and drained, about 12 times per hour, for one minute each flood cycle. I'm thinking that the mycelium will wick up the water to maintain sustained fruiting without having to soak the substrate. 

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 sounds a good plan.   Would be great if it was possible to innoculate with spawn then put into food n drain to colonize.   I tried king stropharia with constant flow through the substrate though that died and never fruited.   Are you just relying on the greenhouse humidity to prevent fruiting body dry out or do you use a tent over the top?

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I'll use a humidity tent over the grow bed and flood and drain for fruiting. This has worked well for fruiting 5 gallon cakes on top of a flood and drain grow bed using a simple humidity tent.

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Greetings to all!

Nice to see this thread still going...

This work with leguminous woody plants progressed into developing updraft gasifiers where i not only energize my farm but produce +/- 90% pure Biochar.

My feedstock of choice is Acacia Saligna (Port Jackson) and Acacia Cyclops (Rooikrans) which is regarded as invasive in South Africa. The larger pieces are sold off as fire wood and the rest is chipped for Biochar and compost  making. I use the leaves and young stalks for animal feed- the process is to chip them and inoculate with Grey Oyster spawn, i do this in 1 cubic meter containers in a warm environment (heat from my gasifier) roughly 24 degrees C. After about three weeks i remove about a quarter for my next batch, then fill the container with water and seal it, heat up to about 50 C. I allow this to go for about four days - this is called Hydrolysis which is the first of four stages of bio digestion. The idea is that the mycelium has broken down about 30% the the lignin which allows access to the amino acids etc. protected by the lignin you can call it stored energy! Putting it through Hydrolysis breaks up the polymers of the sugars - when the process is complete i drain and use the water on my compost, let the gestate dry and have a 24-26% protein feed for my free range pigs, also makes a great fish feed! 

I found using the biochar as a filter more effective ( once saturated put in garden and replace filter) and i do fill a few bags of inoculated substreight for mushroom growing.

A neighbors farm is heavily encroached with Port Jackson and Acacia Cyclops - probably has enough for me to buy the farm if i use it all turning it into Energy, Carbon and Protein.

Much Regards

Luke 

ande and Jackal like this

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Wow, you are light years ahead! I'm just trying to grow mushrooms as part of my aquaponics system.

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