velacreations

Mushroom biofilter?

82 posts in this topic

Hi Abe,

i am still in the process of adding it into my new system where i am still playing with water flow. After solid separation, filtration and settling the nutrient water will go off in several directions, i imagine about 200 liters an hour will pass through the Mycofilter.

Basically it will have 2 chambers much like the grey water system you posted a while back, just in my wicking bed runs. They will alternate 2 week cycles between incubating and fruiting, i will be able to do that at the flick of a tap.

sorry it is all a little vague, but will have it working together (hopefully)in the next week and will post a video.

much regards

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Flavor of the Oyster mushrooms is unbelievable, lightly fried in home made butter and garlic.

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they are good, aren't they? Our whole family loves them, and we are always excited on harvest day!

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awesome! how long did those take to grow? any details on their filter capabilities? which versions work best? water rates?

great work!

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Val - A couple questions for you. Are you concerned with the possible toxins the mushrooms are taking up in a greywater situation and eating them? Or can you point me to some literature to learn more about why that isn't a concern? I've seen the video where Stamets used mushrooms to clean up an oily pile of soil. Obviously those wouldn't be safe to eat or would they? IF they aren't safe to eat due to the toxins then what do you do with them after they are done remediating the soil?

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Replying to my own post but I've re-read the Stamets study and starting to read his book Growing Gourmet and Medicinal Mushrooms. The oil pile oysters were free of any petroleum products. It's starting to come back to me now. I guess heavy metals are the biggest concern on using mushrooms to remediate. Have you seen the report on how they are using mycelium to remove e.coli? http://fungi.com/pdf/articles/Fungi_Perfecti_Phase_I_Report.pdf Exciting stuff.

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yeah, it is exciting stuff!

I don't know about toxins in greywater, as we tend to avoid products that are full of toxins, anyway. For the most part, our greywater only has soap added. In our greywater, the most significant thing would be bacteria, and I think it would be interesting to see how the mushrooms dealt with that.

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All the stuff I'm reading lately seems that the mushrooms will kill bacteria like e.coli in that PDF I linked, most likely through the enzymes they create. They are also used to kill nematodes in soil. But those are dependent upon the specific strain of mushroom. Not sure though if they kill everything or know the difference between bad vs beneficial.

It would be interesting to see what the mycelium would do to a aquaponics bed. Take an existing growbed that has an established nitrifying bacteria colony, split that into 2 smaller beds. Have one act as the control then inoculate the second. After some time measure the difference between the two.

I'm still absorbing and processing a ton of stuff to build an aquaponic/vermiculture/myco integrated system. The idea is starting to become a bit more clear.

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I don't think the mushrooms "know" the difference between good or bad bacteria, but they naturally produce anti-bacterial substances. On top of that, they change the nature of the water/substrate, so it's not a great place for bacteria to survive.

Still, I think there is a lot to learn and test, here.

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Wiki:

"An ideal substrate will contain enough nitrogen and carbohydrate for rapid mushroom growth"

 

Nitrogen (ammonium nitrate) we have in AP, only need filter with carbohydrate which is not dangerous for fish, and voila....mushrooms in AP.

 

It is plausible  :)

 

 

gl&hf

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one more thing

If AP system is in basement....bingo.

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Thought i would revive the thread by saying that i have converted all my filtration to Mycofiltration! It really makes the most sense. Sadly i have not done enough scientific based data capture as i am very focused on my new project. In saying that i will be repatriating a lot of land and will be using mycelium on a large scale. To put it briefly - it will serve as the foundation of the entire project.  

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Hi Ravnis,

 

apologies if i have created confusion. Yes since moving over to a new project six months ago, i took one recirculating system with me where the water returns to the fish after passing through the Mycofiltter. I took the system because it is relatively movable and we needed to have food going as quickly as possible- it has served us well and the fish (O. Niloticus) are very healthy. I have handed over the running of the other systems that i have built over the last few years, check on them from time to time.

 

I am busy building a huge integrated system on land that i am repatriating involving a series of ponds over a 100 hector area. I am using Mycellium to not only filter but to get new vegetation going as quickly as possible in order to beat the alien vegetation once i have cut it down.

 

i hope this is a little clearer

regards luke

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wow! awesome development.  What species are you using?  Any tips or tricks for people who want to get started?  What about size of mycofilter compared to weight or size of fish component?

 

Could you take photos or show us generally how it works?  I get the general idea, but it would be nice to see how to move water through the mycelium.

Combining aquaculture and mycoculture is awesome, and I really like the potential here.  Mushrooms typically are worth a lot more than vegetables, and they don't do well outside in most climates, so tehya re basically grown hydroponically, anyway.

 

Very cool, keep us updated and congrats on yoru success!

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Oh, another thing, did you ever try feeding spent substrate or mycelium to Tilapia?  My pigs and poultry eat it really well, and supposedly, it has a lot of protein.

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Greetings Abe,

 

It has been an incredible journey and i really do have you to thank- you were the original inspiration!

 

i am currently running a 1300 liter tank with 32 Tilapia through a 35cm x 20cm x 30cm filter. i replace the substrate every 2,5 to 3 months and am getting up to 6 flushers- crazy! on the current one i am growing some rice, just for fun, growing beautifully on top of the substrate. i am growing Grey Winter Oysters (Pleaurotus Ostreatus).

 

This is aside from the serious Oyster and King Oyster production.

 

I find it better to use the spent substrate for BSF and feed that to fish, chickens and other live stock. What was very successful was putting the spent substrate through a hydrolysis reactor (first stage of bio-digestion) and then growing algae which i fed to Daphnia and then both to the Tilapia.

 

For some crazy reason i have had no luck trying to post pics- very frustrating! perhaps i will send some pics by e-mail to Kellen and he can post them.

 

much regards and appreciation luke

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I've always said the greatest gift you can give someone is the gift of inspiration!  I'm glad someone was able to find something beneficial in my posts!

 

wow, 6 flushes is amazing! Pleaurotus Ostreatus is super aggressive, and I'm not surprised at all that you are havign success with that species.

Is the mushroom filter the only filter for the 32 Tilapia?  Do you have aeration as well?  How is the filter set up (flood and drain, trickle, deep water, etc)?

Interesting that BSF eat the substrate, I have successfully fed it to earthworms, I wonder if other insects like mealworms might be able to eat it.

What is a hydrolysis reactor?  I'd love to hear more about your algae growing setup as well.  You have a lot of really good things happeneing there.

Feel free to email photos at info@velacreations.com, and I can post them for you, as well.

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