DScottBrown

High Temperature Fish.... Which species?

5 posts in this topic

Living in a desert climate has some concerns for me. Our temperature in Tucson, AZ can go from a low of 30F/0C in the winter to a high of 110F/44C during the summer. What is really crazy is that we normally have an almost 30 degree temperature differential throughout the year. So heating and cooling the FT will be an issue. I've have some creative ideas up my sleeve and can't wait to share.

My system will be in my back yard, with the fish tank under a patio awning.

What fish species would be best suited for high temp areas? I'd love to have rainbow trout but it's too damn hot!

TUCSON, AZ, US Average Temperature

daily_high_and_low_temperature_temperature_f.png

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Hi Scott,

Keeping fish in a climate with those temperature variations is going to be a real challenge. My advice would be to opt for a warm water species (like tilapia) because it's going to be easier to heat your water than to cool it......and to think in terms of enclosing you system so that you can even out the temperature swings. Once you enclose your system, you have a chance of controlling the environment within.

Gary

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Hi Scott,

I agree with Gary. I would add that, because of your relatively high ground temperature, putting your fish tank in the ground would likely be a big benefit for you. I might even consider running a series of low flow water lines about 8 feet beneath the ground to help keep a more even water temp throughout the year. This would help "cool" the tank a bit in the summer while providing some additional warmth in winter.

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Hi Scott,

I agree with Gary. I would add that, because of your relatively high ground temperature, putting your fish tank in the ground would likely be a big benefit for you. I might even consider running a series of low flow water lines about 8 feet beneath the ground to help keep a more even water temp throughout the year. This would help "cool" the tank a bit in the summer while providing some additional warmth in winter.

Thanks for the suggestion. I love the desert however the heat does add an extra layer of engineering into any project!

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I live in the Inland Empire of Southern California and so my temperature swings are similar. Our tilapia did just fine with the heat, but definitely required assistance during the winter. We have an above ground FT with insulated walls, and the whole system is enclosed in a plastic-sided greenhouse that doesn't seal. Heat loss was the biggest challenge for us, and likely will be for you also. Excess heat, on the other hand, was no issue at all.

I agree that a sunken tank should help a lot. The husband also build a solar water heater that assisted... but wasn't sufficient all by itself. We still had to supplement with electric bucket heaters (which are expensive to run). We also didn't cover the FT, which would have reduced the heat loss considerably. I strongly suggest you do so. I posted recently about the solar heater he built, if you want to try adding something like that to your plans. It's based on one Gary had recommended. Of course another option is to harvest your fish before the coldest part of the winter. People say you can raise them to plate size within that time frame. We failed to do so, but we started them at 1". You might consider getting them a little bigger than that, with the intention of doing a full harvest in winter and starting over the next spring. I suspect that the extra expense of larger fish is more than balanced out by the reduction in heating costs. And you'll grow plenty of produce through those months to last until you can start harvesting again. In fact, you will likely have enough nutrients in your water to keep the system running through the winter without fish if you choose. Hmmm... I should try that myself.

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