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A Critical Analysis of Hunters' Ethics

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Hi all

As a avid hunter, I think it's my duty, to reflect upon, the impact (emotional) my actions,might have, amongst those, that are oposed to, or unfamiliar with hunting.

I don't belive it's a human right to hunt, more so a legal, right granted to me, by the society in wich I live.

There is allways a posibilietie that laws change.

I belive the way legal rights are practised, is what decides, when/iff a change of law, is seen as needed.

So it's primarily up to me, and my fellow hunters, to practise these legal rights, in such manner, that generations to come, can legaly carry on, with this heritidge.

This is a good read for all hunters IMO A Critical Analysis of Hunters' Ethics

Quote:

A Critical Analysis of Hunters' Ethics

Brian Luke*

I analyze the "Sportsman's Code, arguing that several of its rules presuppose a respect for animals that renders hunting a
prima facie
wrong. I summarize the main arguments used to justify hunting and consider them in relation to the prima facie case against hunting entailed by the sportsman s code. Sport hunters, I argue, are in a paradoxical position- the more conscientiously they follow the code, the more strongly their behavior exemplifies a respect for animals that undermines the possibilities of justifying hunting altogether. I consider several responses, including embracing the paradox, renouncing the code, and renouncing hunting.

My father told me more than once that there were killers and there were hunters, good and bad ways to kill animals, worst men and best men. -- Robert Franklin Gish 1

HOW TO HUNT

A survey of hunting literature reveals a high degree of consensus regarding what constitutes ethical sport hunting.2 The primary rules of the "Sportsman's Code" are the following:

SC1. Safety first;

SC2. Obey the law;

SC3. Give fair chase;

SC4. Harvest the game;

SC5. Aim for quick kills;

SC6. Retrieve the wounded.3

Attention to safety and obedience to ....................................................................Quote end

Enjoy and reflect

cheers

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I don't hunt anymore but I do try to eat mindfully. Don't sit stuffing my face while watching TV and to make a mental note that an animal died for me to have this meal. It's my way of being respectful to life.

I think hunting IS a right and it has been abrogated by society so people think it isn't. At what point in the development of our society did anyone say, "and we will give up our right to get our own food?"

Just because we breed so senselessly that we have overrun the world like a plague doesn't mean other people automatically get to make it illegal for us to do the basics in order to live. We might self-control our ways because we see the danger in 7 billion people al going out to hunt (although if we could guarantee seed stock it might be a good way to bring down the population :wink: but I see the prohibition against hunting as a continuation of the ownership of land by the rich - a system that is supposed to be gone in the distant past.

In fact it is a symptom of something wrong with our society - older (wiser?) peoples saw themselves as belonging to the land where we think we can own it. They tended the land, we poison it and tear it apart. They saw themselves as a part of a system where we think we exist above any system and can do whatever makes us profit.

And I am betting not one of the anti-hunters will ever undertake an analysis of their stance because of the impact their actions might have on those who love to hunt. Strange, don't you think? :(

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Hi,

I think hunting IS a right and it has been abrogated by society so people think it isn't. At what point in the development of our society did anyone say, "and we will give up our right to get our own food?"

I'm also supportive of hunting as a means of obtaining food....but we forfeited the right to hunt when we stopped taking responsibility for the sustainability of the lands upon which we hunt.

When we stop taking responsibility for anything....and vest that responsibility in others (particularly government and quasi-government regulatory agencies) we should expect those things that we previously took to be rights to get tampered with.

In fact it is a symptom of something wrong with our society - older (wiser?) peoples saw themselves as belonging to the land where we think we can own it. They tended the land, we poison it and tear it apart. They saw themselves as a part of a system where we think we exist above any system and can do whatever makes us profit.

And that's why it's inappropriate to think in terms of the right to hunt. Hunting has become a privilege and, in my view, it should only be available to those who demonstrate that they are sufficiently responsible and that they engage in hunting with the long term well-being of the hunted species firmly in mind.

Gary

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I believe hunting is a natural right, grandfathered in..... as people we hunted and gathered long before other people decided to lie to us enough to gain a vote..... however, I do believe we should be responsible enough to harvest quickly and humanely. our own natural resource department has claimed hunting and fishing in michigan accounts for over 3 billion dollars annually.... if their financially broke now.... how will they fare if you ever take away that income?

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When I was only 5 or 6 I used to tag along with my Dad and Grandpa when they would go hunting.  I got my first rifle at 12.  Grandpa, who was an excellent hunter taught me how to shoot.  Dad preferred fishing and only went hunting once in a great while, mostly to spend time with HIS dad.  Anyway, The spring I learned to shoot, I took the opportunity to shoot a sparrow.  I put the dead bird in a jar and carried it around.  As the day progressed, my conscience went nuts.  I had killed the bird for no reason other than my 'pleasure'.  I swore than night I would never kill gratuitously ever again.  I have not.  I love hunting.  I hunt for meat and occasionally have to shoot a predator around the farm.  Even they get fed to something (chickens, pigs, etc.). 

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Hi,

 

Picture this.  If a thousand Americans simultaneously did what that bloke did, it would trigger a mass reaction among citizens that would really make the government quake in fright.  Within days, the term "new world order" would take on a whole new meaning.

 

It would be a great day in every country where democracy has been affronted by the "one-percenters" who seek to keep us in a state of virtual serfdom.

 

That bloke is a true American hero in my eyes......not so much for what he said (because I couldn't hear a lot of it), but because he has the balls to stand up to authority and assert his right to live as a human being.......and not a bloody gun in sight.

 

Sorry......(for what Ande and Caca describe as) ...."I vent (sic) off topic."

 

Gary

Edited by GaryD (see edit history)

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I sure would have like to have seen that video, the link isn't working anymore...

 

What an interesting topic...  There's nothing natural about how our society impedes on the landscape these days.  Huge quantities of forest are removed, watersheds damaged... we have indeed reached a point where hunting needs to be regulated.

 

A few things of interest to me;

 

I spoke at length with a federal biologist in my area who defended tree farms as the most prosperous place for elk to hold up and forage.  Especially the private outfits that greatly restrict hunter's access...  The thinking is the consistent turnover in rotations provides a lot of acres that are in the youngest stage of growth.  These areas provide tons of quality forage for elk, and deer.  The reason for this discussion was because in the SW portions of Washington state, our private outfit "Weyerhaeuser" comes under huge scrutiny by the public in the accusation that, their pesticides are causing hoof rot and greatly reducing elk populations.  The biologist making the claim that the public isn't thinking so clearly, that all the elk are on Weyerhaesuer land for a their improved environment... that densities of elk are much greater here then in wilderness reserves.

 

The conscious hunter is a valuable thing, I was always taught hunters are some of the most knowledgeable people of environment and do the greatest good towards protecting valuable ecology... the more hunters I meet the more I understand that 95% of those with an .30-06 or .22 slung across their back are just there to escape their wives, drink a ton of beer and hope they see a beautiful animal to take who's unfortunate (and dumb) enough to be walking along a road or ATV trail while cracks of riffle are popping off a mile in every direction...  these guys are weekend warriors and mostly live nothing of a conscious lifestyle and are just hoping to get some meat to go with their excuse to shoot guns, catch a buzz and display a fine rack above the garage... 

 

So... there's 5% of the conscious hunters out there who speak eloquently enough about nature and wildlife that do a heck of a lot of making up for the rest of the gang busters. The DUDES.

Edited by John Urstadt (see edit history)

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Hi JU

 

I sure would have like to have seen that video, the link isn't working anymore...

 

I found another upload of the video enjoy

Quote:

Publisert 23. nov. 2013

Three Forks Justice Court | November 21, 2013 | Montana, North America

In a packed courtroom, 52-year-old Ernie Tertelgte told the judge "I am a living man protected by natural law and I have the right to forage for food when I am hungry... You are trying to create a fictitious, fraudulent action."

Charged with fishing without a license and resisting the arrest for fishing without a license, Mr. Tertegte says he's being wrongly prosecuted for trying to feed himself.

Tertelgte, 52 years old, was arrested on Monday and is accused of fishing without a license and then resisting arrest.
William Wolf said, "It's we the people that run this and rule this country, not we the courts, not we the government, and if the people don't start standing up for themselves and for each other, we are going to continue being subjects of this government."

Justice Adams set Tertelgte's bond at $500 and his next court hearing is scheduled for January.

 

here:

 

I laughf more each time I watch it

cheers

Edited by ande (see edit history)

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Hi JU

 

 

I found another upload of the video enjoy

Quote:

Publisert 23. nov. 2013

Three Forks Justice Court | November 21, 2013 | Montana, North America

In a packed courtroom, 52-year-old Ernie Tertelgte told the judge "I am a living man protected by natural law and I have the right to forage for food when I am hungry... You are trying to create a fictitious, fraudulent action."

Charged with fishing without a license and resisting the arrest for fishing without a license, Mr. Tertegte says he's being wrongly prosecuted for trying to feed himself.

Tertelgte, 52 years old, was arrested on Monday and is accused of fishing without a license and then resisting arrest.

William Wolf said, "It's we the people that run this and rule this country, not we the courts, not we the government, and if the people don't start standing up for themselves and for each other, we are going to continue being subjects of this government."

Justice Adams set Tertelgte's bond at $500 and his next court hearing is scheduled for January.

 

here:

 

I laughf more each time I watch it

cheers

 

Great... I'll take 20 more of this guy please!

 

Love the mountain man exposing just how insane our processing facilities have become.

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