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MentalSquint

Alright guys: Guinea Pigs?

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Some notes to accompany the above: my wife's home town is Pasto Colombia the home of consumption of Cuy (Spanish for Guinea Pig) it is the local delicacy and considered a special occasion food. We actually met over Cuy when I was teaching at a frog conservation course in a non-cuy consuming town in Colombia and she was the only person who could procure the cuy that I had always wanted to try since I had seen a documentary about eating - my then pets - as a kid 20+ years earlier.

There are Cuy tokens everywhere in Pasto a visit to the doctor and staring at you from his desk is a ceramic Cuy complete with stethoscope and white coat. Elsewhere cuy are bakers and clerks, housewives, hairdressers and truck drivers and - you guessed it - the parlour of Pasto’s most famous cuy restaurant has a large cuy chef complete with chequered pants and chef’s hat!

I can also tell you they are delicious – and fresh – you can hear them squealing from the kitchen as they are dispatched. Make sure to order them roasted over the coals and served on a bed of popcorn with roast potatoes. Yes as mentioned above a quick swim in boiling water and you can literally wipe the fur off and roast them skin on. You must have the skin it keeps the juices in and roasts up like a very fine pork crackling. The meat is to die for: more gamey than rabbit, with a hint of rat but much softer and all that wrapped in the thinnest most delicate crackling you will find anywhere.

As for those previous posts worried about eating Bambi – we served them at our wedding to many Australians for whom the only concession we made was removing the heads (sacrilege to most locals as the cheeks are one of the best parts) all but my mother consumed them happily but in the Cuy’s defence we hardly even got my mother from the airport to the wedding after she discovered that taxis like most cars in Colombia come standard without seatbelts and no one remembers anymore why the Mayans painted lines down the middle of roads.

On another topic – PLAESE PLEASE PLEASE I am looking for BSFs - black soldier flies (as posted by Gary Mc elsewhere on this forum) I promise not to eat them without reporting back! – They are for feeding frogs for conservation breeding projects at the Amphibian Research Centre. Anyone who knows anyone who has a friend etc. that has seen one etc. I will pay/beg or offer photos of roasted cuy – heads on or off your choice – if you can please help me get hold of a few maggots/larvae I will be very happy and the frogs very grateful!

Thanks

Gerry Marantelli

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hey Gerry,, you can probably find some online, sold as food for reptiles, i think they sell them by the name of pheonix worms

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Hi Gerry,

I loved the story about the guinea pigs......and I'm even more keen to try them than previously......and Jan is even more keen to make sure that I don't.

I think it was the bit about hearing them squealing in the kitchen that sealed that deal. If I'm going to try guinea pig meat, I'll have to do it elsewhere at this stage.

Gary

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They don't squeal for long - they have very sensitive noses full of blood vessels and the Colombians bang them down onto a concrete bench/basin nose first. They bleed lots - i guess this drains them and i think the bones push up into the brain so they are dead quite quickly. Anyway those that do it are experienced and quick - i will have a good look next time to see exactly how its done.

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Hi Gerry,

You're not helping my guinea pig aspirations at all. LOL.

When you next visit Columbia, arrange for me to call you to hear about your Cuy research.

Gary

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OK Gary I will

but i really go for frog research - not cuy - they are for eating.

PS a gentleman phoned and left a message about sending me some BSFs, I have lost the message - it was deleted by my phone bank - as i was away from work for a week with sick family. If you could contact me again it would be appreciated.

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Hi,

I have been reading this thread with great interest. Just something that occurred to me was that the fur that is removed by scalding might be kept and sold later for making felt or something else. I know that in NZ the fur from feral possums can be sold for this. Akubra hat felt is made from rabbit fur too. So there might be a market for it that is generally unknown. Just a thought anyway.

P.S. they could be fed for free if you can raid the bins of a local fruit and veg shop and they might even give you damaged lettuce, cabbages and other suitable food if you just ask.

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Hey instead of rabbits and Guinea Pigs, you should look into Patagonian Cavies. More Meat and easier to clean, and they reproduce like crazy.

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Hi,

As an interesting aside, the purchasers of "The Queenslander" are keeping guinea pigs for meat. While they have yet to actually eat any, they run them in a fenced raised garden area.

The guinea pigs keep the grass walkways trimmed and will eventually provide delicious meat for the kitchen.

Gary

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Hi,

As an interesting aside, the purchasers of "The Queenslander" are keeping guinea pigs for meat. While they have yet to actually eat any, they run them in a fenced raised garden area.

The guinea pigs keep the grass walkways trimmed and will eventually provide delicious meat for the kitchen.

Gary

How many do they keep approximately Gary?

Any idea?

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I have nothing against people who eat "Guinea Pigs" but unless all the fish, chicken, quail, pigs, rabblts and cattle are all gone from the face of earth. You will be hard pressed to find a rodent on my plate I'm not saying I wouldn't eat one but rodents would the last on the list for food ideas. And heck the rats are bigger than cats in the Philippines more meat on their bones. :)

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haha pugo ur right ive seen the rats in the phils the cats r skinny and the street dogs even skinnier i think gp would be too small for slaughtering for my liking but each to there own . i have also eaten balut yum!

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Hi Shane,

How many do they keep approximately Gary? Any idea?

I think they had about 8 or 9 but they intend to allow them to breed up in the fenced garden enclosure 'til they have enough to start harvesting.

Gary

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