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Murray

Fish we can breed at home (for eating) Aquaponics

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Ok - now I know Jades are not suppose to breed without hormone injections etc - but I will relay this story and you can make up your own mind.

You might recall I had the disaster with the storm spiking my PH and all but 2 of my Jades died.

Well I gave the 2 jades that survived to my Brother to put in his pond. WHich is really a water feature about 1m x 1m x 30cm at his front door. He also took the remainder of my gold fish - all were orange or white gold fish.

I have just been told that the 2 Jades are very happy and eating like horses. And 3 of the Goldfish have survived and are doing great also.

And there are babies in the pond! They are all a dark grey colour. Now I have never bread goldfish - but I would assume that orange and white goldfish would produce orange and white offspring. So my only other thought is that these are jades.

The other thing is that the jades are only about 6 inches long - and I would have thought this was not big enough to breed.

What are your thoughts people?

Murray - do you feel like driving to the Gold Coast to check them out and ID them for me?

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Hamish.

Most, if not ALL goldfish are born bronze or greyish color, these are what we call 'uncolored' They change color as they grow, but not all will. It is pot luck what color they will turn out to be. In my humble opinion, they are baby goldfish.

Laurie.

I would say you are right - lets see how they grow - I guess that will be the ultimate test.

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This morning I received this email from Matt at SEQ Fish.

Matt has given me permission to post this in full for our information.

And.......Matt still has Jade perch fingerlings....If you want some ring and order ASAP

Here is his email.

Hi Murray,

Was just having a read through your forum re breeding fish to be self sustainable. A lot of mis- information there. Here are a few comments you could pass along to your customers.

One issue raised was broodstock sizes- Jades have to me a minimum 800g before we will even consider using them for broodstock, but the majority of my Jade broodstock are 2kg+ and 8+ years old.

Sleepies have to be 800g plus also before we consider using them for broodstock. Most of my broodies are 1.2kg plus.

We inject fish to trigger them to spawn when we want them too. Jades and Silvers will spawn in ponds if the water level rises 4-6 inches in a 24 hour period, however the eggs are slightly negatively bouyant and will sink and die. The eggs need to remain in suspension until the larvae hatch, and then gentle aeration until the larvae are free swimming. The larvae then need static conditions otherwise they will exhaust themselves trying to stay upright and hunt in any current. Injecting fish stimulates the fish's natural hormones to go through the final gonad maturation and egg hydration. The males then pickup on cues from the females and spawn naturally in the tanks. By naturally I mean without any further human intervention. (With Bass and Barramundi we will often strip eggs and milt from the fish manuall). The hormone is not expensive- to do a typical spawn run of Jade would cost us $50 in hormones. Silvers require much less and a spawn run of them would only be $15-30. Barramundi are injected with a different hormone and a injection can cost more when doing a spawn run of Barra.

Spangle Perch are one of the most widespread fish species in the country- they are a pest here at the farm. They get into a fingerling pond and compete with the fingerlings for food, then kill the fingerlings once they are big enough. They are super aggresive, but mainly to other species. They grow incredibly fast, much faster than perch fingerlings, although they only grow to 25cm and 10-12cm is average. I have no doubt that they would spawn in a aquaculture tank. There is still the most overiding point in all this that I see as being the main issue for all the above mentioned species that is the hurdle for home enthusiasts.

Larval Rearing. Larvae need very specific environments- Static water, heaps of food, right temperature and other water parameters and no predators. Broodstock maintenence and spawning fish is by far the easiest part of my job. The broodstock look after themselves. The fish spawn readily when they are in condition and under the right conditions. Raising the larvae is the difficult part. We raise our larvae in ponds and I do raise some jades over winter in artificial conditions. There is plenty of information available on larval rearing- do a google search on greenwater culture and clearwater culture. This process invloves a lot of infrastructure, experience and patience. If you or your customers want to ask something specific please call the office and I will try to answer them, without giving away any industry secrets!

I have to move, but hopefully that will clear up a few points for you.

Cheers,

Matt Johnson

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Hi,

Reading Matt's email reminded me of why I buy fingerlings.....thanks Murray.

Having said that, I'm keen to try breeding Spangled perch. Along with some other organisms like BSF larvae and duckweed, they might be part of the answer to a DIY fish food.

Gary

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I agree Gary, I don't really think any home aquaponics grower really wants the bother of trying to breed their own Jades, Silvers, Sleepies etc. It is really not a practical option..........but for me, I would like to think that I could, if I really wanted to, or had to.

On the good news side for Victorians, a contact of mine down there tells me that the Glenwaters native Fish Hatchery has come through the fires ok. Not sure just what ok means in these extreme circumstances. Don't know how his house fared, but evidently the hatchery is not too bad.

Expects to be able to supply fingerlings again in the very near future.

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Found a little Silver among a pot of water plants (Milfoil). It is only 1 cm or so. Not sure where it came from. Could it be off spring from the Silvers I have, but they were only fingerlings of less than 5 cms a year ago? I doubt so but interesting to find a small silver in the pond ..... since all the rainbow trouts are gone now.

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