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tigerbronze

Help 21 DAY OLD SYSTEM

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Help 21 DAY OLD SYSTEM

FT = 200 LITERS

GB = 20 LITERS X 2

FISH = 35 RED TILAPIA SMALL

PLANTS = 1 CHILLI, 6 LETTUCE SEEDLING, 2 FLOWERS

FILTER = 1 OVERHEAD

AERATION = LOT

ADDITIVE = SEAWEED EXTRACT

DAY 20

MY MASTER KIT JUST ARRIVED

pH = 8.4

AMMONIA = 0-0.25PPM

NITRATE = 80PPM

IAM CONCERNED RIGHT NOW, WHAT REMEDIES SHOULD I DO?

THANKS

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What has you concerned? You should lower your pH, but 0.25ppm ammonia and 80ppm nitrate isn't a problem. What are your nitrites at? Could your growbed media be raising your pH? i.e. limestone. Might want to slowly lower your pH with pure white vinegar. Your stocking density also seems a bit on the high side. Might get to be a problem as the fish grow.

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Well, nirates are a good thing and not to dangerous for the fish, I think you need more growbeds, I understand the worry with the PH being so high that really needs to taken down, What is you grow media? Most fish will thrive in a wide range of pH, and different fish have different ideal pH requirements. pH is a measure of the acidity or alkalinity of a substance. pH is measured on a scale of 1-14 with 7 being neutral. Something with a pH lower than 7 is acidic.

Something with a pH higher than 7 is basic. Water has a pH of 7 naturally, but the water you are using in your tank will be different because of the chemicals that are suspended or dissolved in the water. These chemicals fall into three categories: acids, bases, and buffers. Acids are chemicals that lower the pH, or make the water more acidic. Bases are chemicals that raise the pH of the water, or make it more basic (or alkaline). Buffers are chemicals that can 'tie up' acids or bases and keep the water at a specific pH. Different buffers will keep the pH at different values.

Though almost all fish are very tolerant of a wide range of pH in the water they live and thrive in, sudden and/or drastic changes in pH, almost always harmful. not only to your fish, but also to your plants.

This is some old tricks from back in the days when I kept Aquariums if you want to lower your pH safely, add a piece of wood to the tank. If you want to increase pH, add sea shell . Remember, these will not give you immediate, overnight results, but they will introduce buffering agents to the water to help keep the pH more like you want it.

Okay, something else to think about as your system matures your PH will drop naturally as your fish grow and the biofilter matures. If you don’t have a Biofilter build one..

Faster way to lower your PH is to use acid. You should monitor your pH regularly. When adjustments need to be made, do it in small increments so as not to shock the fish. I think ask Gary what they are using right now.

But this is just what I know, I am also new to Aquaponic I have kept Aquariums since 1970's which means I have been dealing with fish for 40 years, OMG it has been that long, there I go dating myself... LOL and things have changed over the years I remember the days fish died and we had no idea why.

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ADDITIVE = SEAWEED EXTRACT

Isn't seaweed extract a plant food..? Why would you be adding plant food when your nitrate levels are so high..?

Am I mistaken in the thought that the nitrate levels would go down if you stop giving the plants, 'seaweed extract' for dessert..?

Someone please advise me…

Edited by Nelson (see edit history)

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IAM THINKING OF ADDING A FLOATING RAFT AT THE BOTTOM,

DO U THINK ADDING A FLOAT RAFT CAN HELP LOWERING MY NITRATES LEVEL AND pH.

CORRECT ME IF I'M WRONG, WILL THIS WORK FINE.

THANKS

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a floating raft on the ft? the fish may eat the roots..

as suggested, add more growbeds! - you want at least as much gb volume as ft volume.. it looks to me like you are seriously over stocked

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I would add four more of those bins you are using. Still wondering what your media is what kind of rock is it? it doesn't look like river rock it could also be raising you PH. I hope it isn't some kind of lime stone. And yes fish do tend to eat plant roots floating raft in your tank is not something I would do, but others have it all depends on what kind of fish you are raising. But keep in mind you are reducing aeration when you put stuff in the tank.

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Isn't seaweed extract a plant food..? Why would you be adding plant food when your nitrate levels are so high..?

Am I mistaken in the thought that the nitrate levels would go down if you stop giving the plants, 'seaweed extract' for dessert..?

Someone please advise me…

If I'm not mistaken, he's adding seaweed extract so his plants won't have iron and potassium deficiency.

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OK, Seaweed enhances photosynthesis via increasing a plants chlorophyll levels. Chlorophyll is what gives plants their green color. By upping the level of chlorophyll the plant is able to efficiently harness the suns energy. Along with this seaweed contains a complex range of biological stimulants, nutrients, and carbohydrates. To date more than 60 different types of nutrients in seaweed have been confirmed. However seaweed in itself is not a plant food, rather it is classified as a "bio-stimulant."

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OK, Seaweed enhances photosynthesis via increasing a plants chlorophyll levels. Chlorophyll is what gives plants their green color. By upping the level of chlorophyll the plant is able to efficiently harness the suns energy. Along with this seaweed contains a complex range of biological stimulants, nutrients, and carbohydrates. To date more than 60 different types of nutrients in seaweed have been confirmed. However seaweed in itself is not a plant food, rather it is classified as a "bio-stimulant."

So just to clarify this, there are NO nitrates in Seaweed extract and adding it would only encourage the plants to take up more of the nitrates from the fish tank..?

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Congratulations on your new system!

As others have said, you appear to have stocked a bit too densely. The amount of waste your fish produce is much greater than what your growbeds can process and your plants can use. As your fish get bigger this problem will get much worse. (Also you don't have nearly enough room in that tank for the fish if they grow at all.)

As a rule of thumb (and there are certainly a lot of other factors to consider, but this is a good starting point) your volume of growbed should at least equal your volume of fishtank. So for your 200 liter FT you should have at least 200 liters of GB. Otherwise things will get very quickly out of balance.

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Well, seaweed extract does contain nitrogen which could be converted to Nitrate but I don't that it was cause the nitrate levels you have.. Back to the famous forum words " NEED MORE GROWBEDS"

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Firstly, it’s not my system under discussion. I entered the debate in an attempt to learn more about the nitrogen cycle and hypothesised that maybe adding a ‘seaweed extract’ would only compound the problems of an AP system that had high nitrate readings.

My reasoning was that: -

1. Nitrates are plant food.

2. Seaweed extract is plant food.

Therefore, you’re feeding the problem..?

If nitrate readings are high, you either don’t have enough plants to consume the nitrates or you have too many fish producing too much ammonia that will ultimately produce high nitrate, within your system..?

A lot of nitrate in a system is toxic to fish and will eventually kill them… Not as spectacularly as high ammonia, nitrites, pH, etc… but will finally result in aquaponic road kill!!!

So much chemistry! Add this, don’t add that! Feed, don’t feed and don’t walk under a ladder in new shoes..?

I’m new to this AP lark and thought that the symbiotic relationship between plant, fish and bacteria was a match made in heaven. What could be simpler than natures own recipe for a cooperative coexistence between animal, vegetable and mineral..?

Yet, as usual, nothing appears to be that simple. Ultimately, Man has to intervene with his f**king alkaline stabilisers, buffers, uppers, downers, etc… When Michael Jacksons Doctor finally gets released from jail, he’s got a job on my farm for life!

Crank up that Bunsen burner, polish up your mortal and pestle, hypodermics to the ready!

What is going on..?

Either Aquaponics works on a natural, symbiotic basis, or it doesn’t! End of…

If you have to reach for a load of western developed, expensive, first world unobtainable drugs and hardware every time a fish farts, AP is always going to be a developed countries, back garden play thing…

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Firstly, it’s not my system under discussion. I entered the debate in an attempt to learn more about the nitrogen cycle and hypothesised that maybe adding a ‘seaweed extract’ would only compound the problems of an AP system that had high nitrate readings.

My reasoning was that: -

1. Nitrates are plant food.

2. Seaweed extract is plant food.

Therefore, you’re feeding the problem..?

If nitrate readings are high, you either don’t have enough plants to consume the nitrates or you have too many fish producing too much ammonia that will ultimately produce high nitrate, within your system..?

A lot of nitrate in a system is toxic to fish and will eventually kill them… Not as spectacularly as high ammonia, nitrites, pH, etc… but will finally result in aquaponic road kill!!!

So much chemistry! Add this, don’t add that! Feed, don’t feed and don’t walk under a ladder in new shoes..?

I’m new to this AP lark and thought that the symbiotic relationship between plant, fish and bacteria was a match made in heaven. What could be simpler than natures own recipe for a cooperative coexistence between animal, vegetable and mineral..?

Yet, as usual, nothing appears to be that simple. Ultimately, Man has to intervene with his f**king alkaline stabilisers, buffers, uppers, downers, etc… When Michael Jacksons Doctor finally gets released from jail, he’s got a job on my farm for life!

Crank up that Bunsen burner, polish up your mortal and pestle, hypodermics to the ready!

What is going on..?

Either Aquaponics works on a natural, symbiotic basis, or it doesn’t! End of…

If you have to reach for a load of western developed, expensive, first world unobtainable drugs and hardware every time a fish farts, AP is always going to be a developed countries, back garden play thing…

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hello,

i just measured the nitrite this morning = 2 ppm

nitrate = 80 ppm

pH = 8.4

ammonia = 0 to 0.25ppm

i transfered 15 tilapia in other tank.

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Changing grow media in the middle of a cycling process because of a limestone suspecting in the grow media that affect the raise in pH of water -is this helpful ?

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Yes, Limestone is a big NO NO ! not much of a point in cycling with limestone you would still have to start over because of it.. I would look for Hydroton or River stone.. I like river stone even though it is heavy.. As long as the limestone is in your system you will never get the PH down.. So you are left with little choice in this matter.

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if i'm not mistaken, he's adding seaweed extract so his plants won't have iron and potassium deficiency.

musta kabayan

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Yes, Limestone is a big NO NO ! not much of a point in cycling with limestone you would still have to start over because of it.. I would look for Hydroton or River stone.. I like river stone even though it is heavy.. As long as the limestone is in your system you will never get the PH down.. So you are left with little choice in this matter.

grow media in my bin are gravel and charcoal in the middle'

do charcoal can cause the water to be high in pH too, cause they say charcoal has pH of 8.5

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Charcoal is not the likely candidate. What is the PH of the water that you are putting into the system? have you checked the water hardness? you know how hard the water is in the Philippines na lang. Where are you in the Philippines?

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Charcoal is not the likely candidate. What is the PH of the water that you are putting into the system? have you checked the water hardness? you know how hard the water is in the Philippines na lang. Where are you in the Philippines?

my water pH is around 7.4, i'm in batangas, philippines.

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I'm from Bacolod city.. must be the media, However wood is a buffer that will lower Ph over time. So charcoal as I remember is wood based in the Philippines. There must be some source of PH in the growbeds. Try acid but be very careful only a little at a time lagi. See how much it lowers the PH try to get it to a 7.0 but do this very slowly. if you do it to fast it will be harmful to the plants and the fish..

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