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Nelson

A response to a PM in Taiwan

15 posts in this topic

Re: Aquaponics in Taiwan

Hi Neighbour,

I know Hukou very well and visit often as it's my wife's hometown.

I built my small system as an experiment and to get a feel for how difficult (or simple) AP really is. Unfortunately, just as I finished the hardware, I had to return to the UK for a couple of months.

My system: http://www.aquaponicshq.com/forums/showthread.php/5729-Update-on-my-Balconyponics-system?highlight=nelson

As soon as I get back I’m gonna fire it all up and start in earnest.

I have learned a lot from just building my small system and would be happy to chat about my experience when I return to Taiwan.

I should be back from the UK in a couple of weeks or so...

There are thing’s I’d do differently if I were starting again and will probably modify my existing design to make it more reliable, starting with the auto siphon…

Another thing that I don’t get is, the amount of chemistry going on with this forums members. They’re all chucking all sorts of chemicals into the fish tank by the bucket load and using all manner of sophisticated testing kits to monitor the water quality.

How people can hail this as the solution to third world starvation when your typical village in Africa would not have access to these maintenance chemicals and testing facilities.

When I started out on my AP journey, it all seemed so simple. You feed the fish, the fish produce waste, the waste feeds the plants and in the process clean the wastewater and return it to the fish. In reality, it would appear that the fish and plants are doing more gear than Tony Montana on a bad day!

I’m gonna start simple with no chemicals or testing and see how I go. If everything dies then, you’re welcome to make me an offer for my system…

Regards,

Nelson

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Hi Nelson,

Your neighbour has a good sense of humour.

When I started out on my AP journey, it all seemed so simple. You feed the fish, the fish produce waste, the waste feeds the plants and in the process clean the wastewater and return it to the fish.

This is the mantra that advocates of the basic flood and drain aquaponics system have been flogging to newcomers (along with their "turnkey" kit solutions) since Day 1.

No-one who runs a commercial aquaponics system ever said that (and survived the first month) and I've never heard a researcher say it. Most of those who have enjoyed long term success with backyard systems would not agree with the mantra either.

It comes from the need to impress on system purchasers "how easy it is".....as part of the sales pitch by kit suppliers.

You can set a system up so that it is "easy".....but it won't look like anything that you'll buy from most kit suppliers.....and it probably won't produce much either.

Aquaponics is like any other sort of farming. Successful aquaponics requires knowledge, skill and a commitment to the best interests of the fish and plants in your care.

Gary

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Hello everyone..I am new member to this forum.I am glad to join this forum.

Welcome! Tell us about yourself and your goals! Where are you in the U.S? I'm in northeast Indiana.

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jonesalden

Welcome to APHQ! I am sure you will enjoy the forum very much.. So many friendly and helpful members here..

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Gary,

I think you are trying to say something here:

"No-one who runs a commercial aquaponics system ever said that (and survived the first month) and I've never heard a researcher say it. Most of those who have enjoyed long term success with backyard systems would not agree with the mantra either."

but I also think you are masking what you really intend. Perhaps I am too dense. Could you elaborate on this slightly?

Ralgat

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Seems easy enough to understand to me.. All he said was it is not as easy as it looks. Really that is something that all of us have learned after starting a system.

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Hi Ralgat,

but I also think you are masking what you really intend. Perhaps I am too dense. Could you elaborate on this slightly?

It's pretty straightforward. Contrary to the simplistic suggestion made by some people that......."You feed the fish, the fish produce waste, the waste feeds the plants and in the process clean the wastewater and return it to the fish".....aquaponics is like any other sort of farming. Successful aquaponics requires knowledge, skill and a commitment to the best interests of the fish and plants in your care.

Gary

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Thank you Gary and Pugo. I am not sure where my mind was taking me while I read your reply. I think I was waiting for a discourse on why chemicals need to be in the system. I have been struggling with a small system for about 18 months now and although a beautiful concept that I will continue to follow and will definitely expand, it is not totally self-maintaining. As the seasons change, so does the attention to the system.

Hoping to remain as organic as possible,

Ralgat

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You could just turn it into an aquarium you did not need to do water changes on by planting something that you don't need to harvest.

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We really try to avoid chemicals, other than some PH adjustment which is something you have to watch after you have your system running perfectly. So what are your problems? Maybe your fellow members can give you advice.

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Thank you Gary and Pugo. I am not sure where my mind was taking me while I read your reply. I think I was waiting for a discourse on why chemicals need to be in the system. I have been struggling with a small system for about 18 months now and although a beautiful concept that I will continue to follow and will definitely expand, it is not totally self-maintaining. As the seasons change, so does the attention to the system.

Hoping to remain as organic as possible,

Ralgat

I'm not completely sure what you mean by chemicals being in the system. It sounds like you have something against chemicals.

There are several chemicals your plants and fish need in order to survive. These are mainly supplied by the feed as an input and the metabolic processes that convert them into other chemical compounds so that they're bioavailable to the biota in your system. The nitrogen cycle is an example of one of the chemicals in your system.

As far as adding chemicals, yes, there is often a nutrient deficiency for the plants in aquaponic systems due to the nature of the water chemistry and inputs to the system. These are often supplied as inorganic chemical compounds, but counterintuitively these inorganic compounds can be purchased with an organic certification. I hope I have thoroughly confused you! :tongue:

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Maybe people are confusing chemicals and nutrients, As there is a difference, inorganic and organic compounds the difference is the source of the compound whether it is called organic or inorganic. Inorganic compounds are not very helpful in an aquaponics system because it is a RAS an can't be removed. So avoiding them is the best option. I am not saying you can't use them, it is a personal choice, but you will find most people are trying to be as natural as possible with there eco-system they have built.

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Maybe people are confusing chemicals and nutrients, As there is a difference, inorganic and organic compounds the difference is the source of the compound whether it is called organic or inorganic. Inorganic compounds are not very helpful in an aquaponics system because it is a RAS an can't be removed. So avoiding them is the best option. I am not saying you can't use them, it is a personal choice, but you will find most people are trying to be as natural as possible with there eco-system they have built.

Haha, yes there is a lot of confusion. I think people have it in their head that "organic = good" and "inorganic = bad", but what most people don't realize is that plants predominantly absorb nutrients in inorganic forms. I realize most people don't have the knowledge to figure this out for themselves, but the whole "organic movement" and "organic certification" is just corporate marketing at its best. The environment is still impacted, food nutrition is still lost, and it is not done in a sustainable manner. It's just silly to even try to have this kind of PREJUDICE!

Yes, I realize there's a bit of wordplay involved here, but I want to shake people's assumptions a bit. Aquapionics isn't great because it "meets organic certification", but it's great because it's SUSTAINABLE. Aquaponic systems can have a ZERO impact on the environment. ZERO! What other current agriculture practices can claim that? NONE. ZIP. ZERO! :smile:

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Dear Nelson, never so embrassing.

you may take a visit http://twaquaponics.blogspot.com to search for the free video and support at Taiwan.

Taiwan Aquaponics Association is "not for profit federation". So it is welcome to your visit. If you need CHINESe speaking or TAIWANESE speaking, you may ask your wife to leave message there. They will introduce the nearest local aquaponics habbist to connect with you. keep in touch!!!

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