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johan

A big hello! from Taiwan

34 posts in this topic

Sweetcorn is Nelson again, nothing more needs to be said.

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Hi,

Nelson's "contributions" have led to an increase in the workload associated with running the forum....particularly on the part of our moderators....which irritated me (briefly).

It didn't occur to me then that Nelson's efforts to become a serial pest might also be a valuable training opportunity for our moderators.

This is Dealing with Difficult People 101....in our suite of online learning opportunities.

Never let it be said that we don't provide appropriate training for our people.

.....and congratulations to our moderators on their astute management of the forum. I'm delighted with the way they're handling things.

....and thanks to those of our online community who have lent their voices in defence of what we stand for at APHQ.

Gary

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Engineers usually see themselves as professionals (and therefore above the trades) and tradespeople usually see themselves as very practical people who often have to resolve problems created by engineers.

Gary I love your words above in bold. Maybe I'm warped but find that truly amusing! Kind of reminds me of some commissioned officers I knew in the military vs. the noncommissioned officiers! :wink:

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Gary I love your words above in bold. Maybe I'm warped but find that truly amusing! Kind of reminds me of some commissioned officers I knew in the military vs. the noncommissioned officiers! :wink:

The most dangerous thing in the military is a 1st Lt with a map. LOL

But as a tradesman, I often wonder why I don't get paid for the design work after informing the engineer that his design won't work or is outside the code.

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Gary,

That was an excellent training program. Learned all the in and outs of the forum software.

cedarswamp,

I agree with you a shave tail first Lieutenant has to be a very dangerous thing to follow into battle.

Tradesman there are many kinds good and bad, My favorite are the ones that think a hammer will fix anything, A craftsman is a craftsman but they are few and far between. Just as there are bad engineers there are bad mechanics, The bad engineers are lazy people would don't think the problems through, Bad mechanics just don't know any better or don't care.

The first place of employment after the university was a machinery rebuilding company, they felt it was important for engineers to have excellent working knowledge of the machines they dealt with, so I was put on the floor and had to work with mechanics for two years, kind of a mini apprenticeship program, The mechanics took great pleasure in training the college boy, They pulled every dirty trick they could think of. at the time I hated everyday, but I also knew that I was learning things faster than I could have any other way. I learned so much but the biggest thing I learned was patience, it has served me will all these years.

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Gary,

That was an excellent training program. Learned all the in and outs of the forum software.

cedarswamp,

I agree with you a shave tail first Lieutenant has to be a very dangerous thing to follow into battle.

Tradesman there are many kinds good and bad, My favorite are the ones that think a hammer will fix anything, A craftsman is a craftsman but they are few and far between. Just as there are bad engineers there are bad mechanics, The bad engineers are lazy people would don't think the problems through, Bad mechanics just don't know any better or don't care.

The first place of employment after the university was a machinery rebuilding company, they felt it was important for engineers to have excellent working knowledge of the machines they dealt with, so I was put on the floor and had to work with mechanics for two years, kind of a mini apprenticeship program, The mechanics took great pleasure in training the college boy, They pulled every dirty trick they could think of. at the time I hated everyday, but I also knew that I was learning things faster than I could have any other way. I learned so much but the biggest thing I learned was patience, it has served me will all these years.

So did they send you to find the left handed pipe wrench or the metric adjustable wrench? LOL

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They did try that one. The best one I remember was they put black paper in my welding hood. Then feed me a line , that I was flash blinded. They kept telling to go was my eyes with cold water, so then they would take the paper back out. They had me running back an fourth washing my eyes all day. In the middle of the day I told them it was the hood not me, So one of the tradesmen put on the helmet and weld a beautiful weld with it. Of course he was welding blind but I didn't know that at the time.. so off to the bathroom to wash my eyes. Heck of a day that was...LOL usually they rode me hard and put me up wet everyday but that only went on for the first six months after a while I earned their respect and we all became friends.

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Hi,

Gary I love your words above in bold. Maybe I'm warped but find that truly amusing! Kind of reminds me of some commissioned officers I knew in the military vs. the noncommissioned officiers!

I always found it amusing that, as engineering mechanics, we often found ourselves training midshipmen and first lieutenants to the point where they learned enough to start telling us how it should be done.

Interestingly, most officers undergo a change in mindset as they mature, and they take delight in regaling wardroom dinners with stories of how they were trained by non-commissioned officers......and how it was the defining experience in their careers.

Mind you, they often gave us the horrors for years before they arrived at this important point in their development as leaders.

Gary

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Johan,

I was in Taiwan for a month in January/Feb. I had a lovely time. The Taipei subway was awesome as the signs are all in English.

Good luck on your system. I hope you speak chinese well enough to find all the parts you will need for your system.

Kingjam

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