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GaryD

Golden Perch

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Hi,

I recently purchased 50 Lake Eyre strain golden perch fingerlings from Ausyfish.

Contrary to what we'd heard from other sources, they have (so far) proven to be easy to manage. They are eating and growing.

I've eaten wild caught golden perch so I know that I'll like eating this lot when they get to plate size.

In my home state of South Australia, they are called callop, while here in Queensland, their colloquial name is yellowbelly.

Anyone else had experience of this species?

Gary

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yep I bought 50 from Ausyfish as well, Im very new to aquaponics so I guess I lacked the experience to manage these fish. One by one they all died ! I just couldnt seem to get them to take the artificial feed. Perhaps with a bit more knowledge and experience I could be successfull but I think I will leave this species alone for a few years at least.

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Hi Phil,

I'm sorry to hear about your fish. I've heard a few people say that they are difficult to get onto feed. I've even heard one commentator suggest that, not only are they not good fish for aquaponics, but that they are not even suited to aquaculture.

Mine seem to be going OK at the moment......knock on wood.

Gary

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Hi,

My golden perch are powering along......slowly.

Last night, we moved them out of my Queenslander system and put them back into a small mega bin system.

Hopefully, now that we can see them (they usually hid in the centre drain pipe in the Queenslander for most of the time), I'm hoping that we can tame them a bit......and get them to feed a bit harder.

Interestingly, this little system is the same thing that I started out with. Whenever we need a system at short notice, I just round up a mega bin and my trickling bio-filters and put it together.

While it lacks the refinements of my latest system designs, these little mega bin systems are arguably the quickest way to get backyard aquaculture going.......particularly for fingerlings.

It costs about $500.....and you can buy everything off-the-shelf. You can start your fingerlings off in something like this and add to it as you have the time and resources.

While I like some of the things that people have done with IBC's, I prefer mega bins to work with.

Gary

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Just the two trickle filters for the GP Gary?

No swirl filter?

I ask as I'm about to begin a small Megabin RAS for Trout in the shed (shhhhh....dont tell the wife).

I'm thinking a swirl filter/ into a further fines filter/ into a trickle filter/ back to FT.

Enclosed in the shed, so no lighting or GB's at the moment (may hook something up if I have left over room at a later date).

Cheers,

Shane.

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Hi Shane,

At the moment, I'm just using the two trickle filters......and a wad of filter foam.....in each of the water distributors.

The golden perch are still very small and most of the solids lie around on the tank bottom. I syphon them out each day at the same time that I rinse the filter foam out. It's labour-intensive, but also temporary, so it's not too big an issue.

Because it's a simple RAS, I'm also doing periodic water changes to keep the nitrates under control.

I'll probably end up converting this system to a little CHOP unit in the coming weeks.....and that will reduce the cleaning tasks dramatically.

I ask as I'm about to begin a small Megabin RAS for Trout in the shed (shhhhh....dont tell the wife).

If your wife is anything like mine, she'll know what you're thinking.....even before you do.

I'm thinking a swirl filter/ into a further fines filter/ into a trickle filter/ back to FT.

Enclosed in the shed, so no lighting or GB's at the moment (may hook something up if I have left over room at a later date).

These little RAS' are so easy and convenient to put together. Operated in conjunction with a soil-based garden (or wicking beds), they are a dream to operate and can be used to grow out very useful quantities of fish with the minimum of fuss.....at a fraction of the cost and effort of a basic flood and drain system.

Gary

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Hi Shane,

If your wife is anything like mine, she'll know what you're thinking.....even before you do.

Gary

Yep.....I've already been caught cleaning up the shed.

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Hi Shane,

.

That would be interpreted as a sign that I'd done something bad (or was about to) around here, too.

Gary

Same,

.....& as soon as the Missus heads out shopping.....I can unload the station wagon & smuggle some bits & pieces inside the shed !!:D

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Hi,

It's about nine months since we obtained our golden perch fingerlings.

While their conditions have been far from ideal, they've grown considerably in that time.

They appear to prefer a sinking pellet feed but the stuff that I've been feeding them is just 2mm - too small given their size. I'm loathe to use feed that costs nearly $60.00 per bag as garden fertiliser so I've continued to give it to the perch long past the time that I should have been using a larger pellet.

That, coupled with inadequate filtration (and the effect on feeding rate).....and winter temperatures......has, I suspect, conspired to limit their growth.

While this lot will take two years to grow out, they may prove to be a 12 month proposition in ideal growing conditions.

I bought some larger pellets about three weeks ago and now, as I approach their tank, they just hover in the water looking at me.....waiting for me to throw some pellets into them.

Gary

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I am paying about 35 dollars a 20 Kilo bag of floating feed, for my Tilapia. it seems a little large for them but they pick at it until it is soft and it is gone in no time. but I can only get that one size..:(

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Hi,

I noticed that the ammonia levels in the tank containing my golden perch were a bit elevated.

A search of the tank revealed the cause.....two dead fish. These are among the smallest of the fish in the tank.

I'm unsure as to why these have died but I've noticed that golden perch are very shy. I picked up one (about three times the size of these) a couple of weeks ago and it "fainted" in my hand - looked to be dead. When I returned it to the water, it just sank slowly to the bottom of the tank. When I reached into the tank to remove it, a few seconds later, it kicked a couple of times, righted itself and swam off.

Gary

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The Golden perch is a lovely fish...but I am new here....what do you guys intend doing with them? I assume sell the fingerlings commercially,...but to who? Unless you have a larger facility to grow them to plate size.

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Hi Geekay,

We are growing the fish for our own consumption.

Most Australian native species require fairly intricate manipulation of the environment.....and the use of hormones......to get them to produce fry. This activity is largely outside of the scope (and skill set) of the average backyarder

Gary

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Hi Shane,

Yes.....they range from around 250mm down to 75mm.

Having said that, I could hardly claim that this bunch was representative of the species' potential.

For much of the time that I've had them, they've been in a system where the water quality conditions have been far from ideal......and feeding has been largely driven by water quality.....to the point where I'd describe these as very tough fish.

They're now in my new small system where things are much better and where they are fed more consistently.

Gary

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Hi,

My golden perch are continuing to grow nicely......with one exception.

I found this poor little bloke hanging out of the mouth of one its much larger siblings.

While it was a bit too late for the small fish, I managed to save the much larger one who was trying to eat it but was finding it more of a mouthful than it could handle......until I netted it and shook the little fish loose.

This sort of situation often claims both the eater and the eaten. While it's a periodic occurrence with fish like Barramundi, this is the first golden perch that we've lost to one of its siblings.

Gary

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Hi,

Today, we expanded our mega bin system and that gave us a chance to get close to our golden perch.

I took the opportunity to grab a couple of photos of some of the larger fish.

About half of the fish are of reasonable size while the other half are much smaller.

Gary

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Hi,

Acting on an impulse, I grabbed one of my golden perch fresh out of the tank (green water and all), cleaned it and fried it up for breakfast.

Nice soft white flesh with a very pleasant taste. Yummm!

I'm happy to report that the rest of my golden perch are now on the "seriously endangered" list.

Gary

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Hi,

I'm happy to report that the rest of my golden perch are now on the "seriously endangered" list.

Gary

Made me chuckle :)

Is it worth implementing a net or some other kind of internal barrier to setup two halves on your mega system and have the fish sorted into 'big'uns and 'little'uns in order to help them grow out a little more evenly or is the plan just to eat them as they get big so having diversity actually works out for you and the family.

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Hi,

I purchased our current golden perch as fingerlings back in November 2010. By my reckoning, we've had our fish for about two and a half years.

My experience of them has yielded a number of interesting insights:

  • In terms of their grow out period, they are similar to silver perch..... and, like silver perch, they grow unevenly in fish tanks.
  • They are, however, much more robust than silver perch (which I've noticed tend to get sick quite easily by comparison). I know that some of what my golden perch have experienced (unexpected system failures, etc) entitles them to be described as a robust species. This is borne out by looking at the sorts of places that the species exist in the wild.
  • They eat sinking pellets - not my preferred feeding regime - and this means that you have to be wary of uneaten feed accumulating in the system.
  • They are very good eating.

They are a challenge....but, in my view, they should be further developed by fisheries researchers as a tank species. In my opinion, they have better market potential than silver perch.....and they are a better tasting fish.

Gary

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