Joey

Joey's Hybrid Gravel grow bed/Floating raft system

157 posts in this topic

Rocket Leaves ??? OK, that is a new one for me.. Can anyone elaborate on this?

Pugo, they are also a great addition to sandwiches/wraps.

Vernacular names include garden rocket or simply rocket (British, Australian, Canadian & New Zealand English), eruca, rocket salad, and arugula (American English). All names ultimately derive from the Latin word eruca, a name for an unspecified plant in the family Brassicaceae, probably a type of cabbage.

more here...http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eruca_sativa

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Americans couldn't even give it a proper name..:( unspecified plant, probably a type of cabbage. That's embarrassing.

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Hi

Last monday I travelled to Glenburne and purchased 30 Murray cod fingerlings. They are about 4 cm long and were priced at $2.00 each. They seem healthy but I have never seen such shy fish and I thought silver perch were shy.

Interesting to see they will do over the next year or so.

Regards

Joey

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Good luck with the Murray Cod I will be interested in knowing how that works out for you..:)

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Yes, good luck with the Cod,

Wonder how long it will take to grow them out down here in Vic. ?

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Hi

Just an update of where my system is at.

The cod fingerlings have been on a hunger strike since arriving here, I doubt they were fully weaned on pellets when I got them as they are very small.

Things have started to look up over the last few days. They are swimming around the tank and appear to be chasing food and feeding instead of hiding in a group on the bottom. Out of the 30 cod I still have 24 left. Fingers crossed they can grow from here.

The problem with the 88 trout fingerlings early December was fixed by putting them into a salted tank for about 4 days. (Sadly however a lot of them died.) The remaining 30 fingerlings are poweriong along eating well and have nearly doubled in size.

The 55 Silver perch have become active and are feeding however it will be at least another year before they are plate size, they are so painfully slow.

Out of my large trout in the RAS I still have 28 left. The rest were harvested when the weather looked like heating up the water too much. The weather we are getting at the moment is great, water temperatures 18 - 20 degrees. The hottest water I have had this summer is 26 degrees thankfully not too many of those days.

Cheers

Joey

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Hi Joey,

I re-read your entire thread last night. Congratulations on your systems......they stand as a very good example of what backyard systems should be.

Good luck with the Murray cod. I've reared them, barramundi, jade perch, silver perch and (most recently) golden perch......and I'd say that the cod were the least satisfying to deal with.

Even the golden perch, which the venerable RupertofOz pronounced as a fish "unsuited to recirculating aquaculture or aquaponics", I've found to be much easier to get along with than murray cod. We had them at the same time that we had our 4 tank system and we were engaged in trials to determine the system capabilities.

One of our conclusions was that, where you have some latitude with several other species, murray cod are very unforgiving when it comes to water quality. The other thing we found was that, while you can keep reasonable numbers of other species in small tanks, murray cod seemed to need space.

I hope that you get the trout through what's left of summer without further incident. Buying them when you did was a brave move.

Gary

Edited by GaryD
Added the word "recirculating" to avoid misrepresentation. (see edit history)

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Even the golden perch, which the venerable RupertofOz pronounced as a fish "unsuited to aquaculture or aquaponics", I've found to be much easier to get along with than murray cod. We had them at the same time that we had our 4 tank system and we were engaged in trials to determine the system capabilities.

One of our conclusions was that, where you have some latitude with several other species, murray cod are very unforgiving when it comes to water quality. The other thing we found was that, while you can keep reasonable numbers of other species in small tanks, murray cod seemed to need space.

If I could add to the above comments on fish. The goldens grow well in ponds, though many of them are very difficult to wean onto pellets. Generally, only around 30% come through on commercial pellet diets. The goldens tend to sulk in tanks, well at least some of them. Some will thrive in a tank and grow well, others will sulk and sit in the corner and grow slowly. Depends on the tank environment, however they are generally not fond of tanks so their overall growth is quite limited. If feeding pellets chosing the right kind is important. Word of warning, if you feed them live feed there is every chance you will not get them back onto pellets. From a commercial point of view it would be very difficult to make a living out of them.

The murray cods are not that difficult to grow though they are a high management fish, though their water quality requirments are much the same as most other fish in terms of their forgiveness. Contrary to Garys experience, cod will respond well if crowded. But... it is important to keep the feeding regular and preferably constant throughout the day not one or two feeds. Word of warning, if you mess the feeding up, they will begin to nip on each other and it is a slippery bacterial infectious slope from there, generally to death.

I only mention this because I sit down every morning writting parts of my new book soon to be released on practical fish husbandry..... (plug)...

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Hi Paul,

Contrary to Garys experience, cod will respond well if crowded. But... it is important to keep the feeding regular and preferably constant throughout the day not one or two feeds. Word of warning, if you mess the feeding up, they will begin to nip on each other and it is a slippery bacterial infectious slope from there, generally to death.

While I was aware that crowding fish was possible (and even used to counter aggression in certain species), I was under the impression (based on something you told me) that Murray cod would suffer (to a greater expense than other species) from having too many fish in a small tank. I must have been confused.

Perhaps our problems were more to do with feeding intervals than water quality. I assumed that, because we had barramundi and jade perch staying alive.....while the cod were dying at the rate of one two every couple of days.....it was a water quality issue.

At that time, I was trying to determine what numbers of fish were able to be kept in those systems......with a view to being able to counter the local "one fish per 10 litres of water" nonsense that was being peddled at the time.

Gary

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Perhaps our problems were more to do with feeding intervals than water quality. I assumed that, because we had barramundi and jade perch staying alive.....while the cod were dying at the rate of one two every couple of days.....it was a water quality issue.

Generally Murrays go bad if the feeding is messed up. Anything excluding temperature that your Barra and Jades were tollerating as far as water quality goes, the Murrays will have handled. From memory you where having some high temperature issues with the four tank system outside.

Sorry for the hijack, please continue.

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Hi

I lost two more murray cod today, I hope things stabilise soon. The trout are still powering along with water temperatures of 20 degrees. Golden Perch are available here at Glenburn fish farm however I was advised that they were not suitable for aquaponics, therefore I have not tried them. For me trout are my favourites. They are cheap eat well and are a joy to own. My next project next winter will be to insulate my shed and purchase an airconditioner. This way I can prevent the water from heating up when we get the odd day of excessive heat.

There seems to be no fish ideal for auaponics in Melbourne. Silvers are tough and can survive all the local conditions but without heating in winter you are looking at a 2 year plus grow out period.

Cheers

Joey

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Hi Joey,

Golden Perch are available here at Glenburn fish farm however I was advised that they were not suitable for aquaponics, therefore I have not tried them.

I keep the Lake Eyre strain.......sold by Ausyfish. I started out with 50 of them and I still have over 40.....and, while it wasn't my intention, I've inadvertently done some shocking things to them. They are tough fish and there's a great deal more to learn about them.

For me trout are my favourites. They are cheap eat well and are a joy to own.

I'd really like to get my hands on some but no-one's licensed to bring them into Queensland....at this stage.

It's often occurred to me that I should be living in Tweed Heads. It's just on the New South Wales side of NSW/Queensland border but I could farm rabbits and keep trout......and still do all of the things that I can do in Queensland.....but without the bureaucratic nonsense that attends some things.

in fact, the ideal situation would be to have two small properties......one on one side of the street in NSW and the other (on the other side of the street) in Queensland.

There seems to be no fish ideal for auaponics in Melbourne.

Fish-keeping is a bit like that, isn't it.?

While Brisbane is said to be sub-tropical, it's no different to Melbourne in the sense that, with annual temperature swings of 6 - 40 degrees C, is not really suited to any freshwater species as such.

I think that, for backyard purposes, the answer lies in passive temperature control at the high end of the temperature scale and something like rocket thermal mass heaters at the other end.

Productive backyard farming is all about controlled environments.

Anyway, suffice to say, you're doing as well as anyone else.....so keep it up.

Gary

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I'd really like to get my hands on some but no-one's licensed to bring them into Queensland....at this stage.

I love trout too and think they are a fantastic fish to culture and I always get a bit of a chuckle when I see discussions around bringing trout into QLD and the very minor process of bringing them into the State when we already have Brown Trout in the waterways which have acclimated but it is not on the list of acceptable species though Goldfish are lol....

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Hi Paul,

.....and the very minor process of bringing them into the State....

Are you saying that you can bring them to Queensland easily?

Gary

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Do you have any recent pic's of your system Joey ?

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Hi Shane

I have just made a video of my Silver Perch. I will take some more shots of what it currently looks like.

Cheers

joey

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Hi Shane

I have just made a video of my Silver Perch. I will take some more shots of what it currently looks like.

Cheers

joey

Great, I'll look forward to the pics when you get a chance:smile:

Our location & water temps are fairly similar,

My 3 or 4 largest Silver Perch are only just now at a decent edible size, they've been in my tank 12-14 mths approx longer than yours have in your tank.

You do need a fair bit of patience with Silvers in unheated water down here.

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Hi

Outside in the dirt garden I have pumpkins although the crop is not as good as last year. My wife's chilly collection has been placed into her polly tunnel. I have some seeds shooting in the Aquaponics system along with a promising crop of tomatoes. See attached photos.

Cheers

joey.

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Hi

Today I harvested this brown trout out of my tank, when I gutted it, the trout deposited hundreds of of fish eggs into my kitchen sink. Can these eggs be harvested by putting pressure on the body cavity. Also can the males be milked the same way. Has anyone tried to propogate trout.

Cheers

Joey.

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Hi

Can these eggs be harvested by putting pressure on the body cavity..

Yes,but I don't know how fast they die, never done it with dead trout.

Also can the males be milked the same way. Has anyone tried to propogate trout.

Yes the males are milked the same way.

Has anyone tried to propogate trout.

Yes, aside from restoring the spawning creeks, thats how we saved the local trouts here, and also how we got/get the trout back in damed (hydropower) creeks and rivers.

We always catch and milk, live wild fish, preferable from the specific location that they are relesed back in to,the year after.

Here is a guide on how to http://www.fao.org/fileadmin/user_upload/Europe/documents/Publications/Trout/propagation_en.pdf

cheers

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Thanks Ande

This document on propogation makes interesting reading and has a lot of detailed information.

It is also interesting to know that you are involved in trout propogation where the fingerlings are released back into the wild.

Cheers

Joey

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Hi

Today I harvested this brown trout out of my tank, when I gutted it, the trout deposited hundreds of of fish eggs into my kitchen sink. Can these eggs be harvested by putting pressure on the body cavity. Also can the males be milked the same way. Has anyone tried to propogate trout.

Cheers

Joey.

Hi Joey,

Great harvest mate. How long did it take to grow that one and what weight?

Regards

Paul

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Hi Paul

This fish was one of the original batch purchased in November in 2010 as very small fingerlings, so it is nearly two years. I haven,t weighed this fish so I can only guess the weight. Probably 800 gram. I still have about 6 fish left from that same batch some are larger and some smaller. It is getting to the stage that these are becoming pets. I harvested this one yesterday to prove to myself I was still a fish farmer.

Cheers

Joey.

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Hi All

In an attempt to raise my PH, I stupidly added too much Hydrated lime into the sump of my RAS. This has resulted in me killing an entire tank of trout. These included the remaining large trout from the original stocking along with a lot of smaller newer fish.

I still have silver perch and murray cod that were in separate tanks of the system. Time will tell to see if they are also affected as their tanks are connected to the RAS.

Cheers

Joey

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