Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
craigb

Salt water system

19 posts in this topic

I wonder how it would go running a salt / sea water fish tank. Admittedly you wouldn't be able to run it through the grow beds - however it may be possible to get Mullet and Bass to spawn if you caused them to go from fresh water into salt. Once spawned you could then send them back into the fresh water.

Perhaps you would have to gradually build the salt levels up to do so to mimic the time it takes for the fish to acclimatise to the increasing salt levels like they would in a natural river system.

Has any one tried growing saltwater fish?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I wonder how it would go running a salt / sea water fish tank. Admittedly you wouldn't be able to run it through the grow beds - however it may be possible to get Mullet and Bass to spawn if you caused them to go from fresh water into salt. Once spawned you could then send them back into the fresh water.

Perhaps you would have to gradually build the salt levels up to do so to mimic the time it takes for the fish to acclimatise to the increasing salt levels like they would in a natural river system.

Has any one tried growing saltwater fish?

Do some research on halophytes/halophites. Some quite interesting species available.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Echidna.

I had a look at it and there could be a few possibilities. One being the zygo type cactus / plants and pig face etc.

The other idea I had is that it may be possible to grow some form of sea weed. Some lagoons and rocky coastal areas have sea weed that is left high and dry when the tides go out - yet recovers when the tide comes back in. Perhaps it could tolerate a flood system where the plants get totally immersed. This sea weed could be used to feed the fish and to make nutrient rich compost.

More thinking is needed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Martin at aquaponics-shop is setting up an experimental salt water system. He may have it running by now. As I understand it the sea weed and the fish are the crops. Evidently the sea weed does the same job as the grow beds do in a freshwater system.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember a story of some guy who was growing citrus/dates or something in the middle of Australia using salt water.

If the water can drain through,the plant can suvive quite well.

May be interesting if you wanted to grow citrus with salt water aquaponics.

Cheers

Max

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi All,

We have finally commenced our salt water aquaponics system. Of course it is too early to say how it will go but we are confident that we will be able to make it work. The first pictures can be seen on our site for those who are interested:

http://www.aquaponics-shop.com/aquaponic-research/saltwater-aquaponics-research.shtml

We will keep you all posted as to our progress.

Cheers

Martin and Kerri

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is very interesting - what is Ulva? Some sort of sea weed? Does it have a comercial value?

Interested to know what else could be grown in a system like this - would be good for those who live in areas near the sea that could pipe sea water into their system.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That is very interesting - what is Ulva? Some sort of sea weed? Does it have a comercial value?

Interested to know what else could be grown in a system like this - would be good for those who live in areas near the sea that could pipe sea water into their system.

Hi Hamish,

Ulva is a macro algae commonly known as "Sea Lettuce". It has many uses. One is that it can be eaten "fresh", for example in Scotland it is used in soups and salads, as well as "dried", like Nori (the dried sea weed that goes around Sushi and is used in a number of Asian soups etc).

We are going to be experimenting here with a number of different macro algae and some sea grass as well. We recently designed and installed an experimental salt water system into Coffs Harbour. I must stress that salt water aquaponics is completely experimental at this point in time.

They have three beds and we designed one of them to ebb and flow so they could experiment with growing Mangroves. The other beds are continuous flow and will have macro algae and sea grass in them like ours here. Of course Mangroves in these systems are completely for experimental purposes only. We can not see commercial viability for them at the size of systems we can build. Again time will tell.

Cheers

Martin and Kerri

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a small salt water research system that I am just about to put into production.

Senior Scientist Dr Amir Neori from the Israel Oceanographic & Limnological Research center has been doing salt water aquaponics for years he is the man with 20 years experience. I meet him about four years ago in Sydney when he gave a talk on salt water aquaponics.

Research interests:

Mariculture of seaweeds and micro-algae

Ecologically-balanced integrated mariculture of fish, seaweeds and shellfish

Selected publications:

Msuya F.E. and Neori A. (2008). Effect of water aeration and nutrient load level on biomass yield, N uptake and protein content of the seaweed Ulva lactuca cultured in seawater tanks. J. Appl. Phycol. (In press).

Neori A. Essential role of seaweed cultivation in integrated multi-trophic aquaculture farms for global expansion of mariculture: an analysis. J. Appl. Phycol. (In press).

Shpigel, M. and Neori, A. (2007). Microalgae, macroalgae, and bivalves as biofilters in land-based mariculture in Israel. Chapter 24 In: Ecological and Genetic Implications of Aquaculture Activities (Bert, T.M., Ed). Dordrecht, Springer, pp. 433-446.

Neori, A. and Shpigel, M. (2006). Algae: key for sustainable mariculture. In: Seaweed Resources of the World, Critchley, A.T., Ohno, M. and Largo, D.B., (Eds), ETI Bioinformatics, University of Amsterdam (a book on DVD).

Murray I owe you a piture of your trays they are going well Thanks

Hope this has helped some one

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Mr B,

Haven't heard from you for a while I guess you are busy.

Thanks for the very good info and the photo. That is excellent.

Please email me some more photos. I really appreciate that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

tailor made in NSW have started a commerical salt water system and have been trialing oysters and thinking pearls one day. They have a good chance as the guy in the photo worked on the local pearl farm.(I love salt water)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any info available as to how they're going to grow the oysters and clean the waste salt water? Are they doing a recirc or run to waste system like the barra?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tailor made in NSW have started a commerical salt water system and have been trialing oysters and thinking pearls one day. They have a good chance as the guy in the photo worked on the local pearl farm.(I love salt water)

Hi B,

Sorry but whoever has told you that it is salt water Aquaponics system is incorrect. I was speaking with one of the directors and he said that they were only doing 'aquaponics' with freshwater effluent.

Cheers

Martin and Kerri

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes Martin and Kerri you are right they do not have a salt water aquaponics system. As I said they have started a commerical salt water system and are trialing oysters and thinking pearls. I was there six weeks ago and seen the oysters with my eyes. I am sorry for my bad writing skills and if I have offended or mislead any one because of my bad writing skills.

This is from the Port stephens Examiner the local news paper. check it out

on the web http://portstephens.yourguide.com.au/news/local/news/general/pearl-of-an-idea-in-fish-farm-future/766169.aspx

Pearl of an idea in fish farm future

BY ANNA WOLF

8/05/2008 10:18:00 AM

PEARLS, spotted groper, flowery cod or even smoked mullet could be produced in the near future at Bobs Farm's Tailor Made Fish Farms.

Managing director Nick Arena said the aquaculture farm, which currently produces about 37 tonnes of barramundi each year, was constantly looking for ways to expand.

"We have been looking at the possibility of producing pearl oysters, spotted groper and cobia or even marketing and selling Port Stephens smoked mullet, but these are all just ideas," Mr Arena said.

"At the moment we are concentrating on the developments we have already got underway."

A $2 million expansion which includes a tourist and education centre, combined with a restaurant that can cater for 200 people is due to be completed by October this year.

The centre when open, will cater for school and tourist groups as well as functions including 21st celebrations, conferences and weddings.

"I don't know how many brides will be keen on the idea of having their wedding at a fish farm at first, but it is something different," he said.

Annual production of barramundi is also expected to increase to 90 tonnes per year within weeks.

Mr Arena said that mullet, which was taken from beaches in and off the Port, had not been fully explored as a local product.

"They take the roe and export it overseas and the rest ends up in pet food," he said.

"We might move into an area that markets and sells smoked mullet which is quite a nice product."

The fish farm also currently produces around 100,000 heads of lettuce each year. Plans to begin selling packaged salads are also underway.

headinthecloud from what I seen and after talking to the guys on the floor it is still early days. I have worked on fish farms and been involed indeveloping aquaponic systems and research in aquaculture and in my opinion very early days. Here is a piture of me form 2001 researching some bio-filter media, that is like the K1 media this project lasted one year,it inculed the building of the system. The fish in the system are snapper and mullaway. I wish tailor made and the aquaponics shop all the best with there salt water research. And hope one day Australia has a stronge salt water aquaponics industry. ozzi ozzi ozzi ohi ohi ohi And apologise again for if any one feels that they were mislead or offended for my bad writing skill.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am sorry for my bad writing skills and if I have offended or mislead any one because of my bad writing skills.

Hi B,

No need for an apology at all - it is has not or should not (in our opinion) have offended anyone. It was just that the thread is about aquaponics and so we thought it was an aquaponics system you were talking about. It really is not a big deal we just wanted to clarify it.

Cheers

Martin and Kerri

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the idea of saltwater but could never think of saltwater plants to grow. But with everyone using seasol maybe seaweed is the answer. For a small saltwater system growing a few saltwater fish or crayfish and having the plants being seaweed. That then can be made into a seaweed tea for the other AP system.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0