GaryD

Black Soldier Fly Larvae

315 posts in this topic

They can also be sold to pet keepers for pretty good prices.  They are great food for a lot of different lizards, snakes, frogs, birds and others. 

that's for sure. my biggest problem last summer was getting them before the little droptail lizards (skinks?) would get them.  just cleaned it out and got it ready the other day and i already have lizards there waiting.....   

will the trout eat the lizards?

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I tried to read all of the pages, but do not have the time. My question is can you use duckweed in the biopod as food for the BSF?

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Hi,

 

Yes, you can.......been doing it for years.

 

The search function on this forum seems to be pretty effective.  Enter duckweed and biopod in this topic forum......and you'll see a handful of posts that refer to using duckweed to feed BSF larvae.

 

Gary

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I use maggots in feeding my chickens as well as beetle larvae, my larvae wind up being whatever is naturally flying around.  I get tiny ones from fruit gnats and bigger ones from different types of flies.  When I clean the hay from the barns and pens and pile it up, and let them set for about two years and then break them open and I get beetle larvae about 1/2 inch in diameter and about 1 inch long by the coffee cans full.  I have no idea what type of beetle they may be, but the chickens sure love them and they grow like mad in the waste hay and manure piles I set up.  I usually wait two years and then start breaking the pile apart a little each day and let the chickens break the material up looking for the grubs.  They break the hay up into tiny pieces about 1/2 inch long or less in the process making it easy to till into the garden then.

 

I will have to look up the black soldier fly and learn more about them.

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Hi Mountain,

 

You'll find BSF larvae a very worthwhile addition to your existing larvae production/capture methods.  In fact, one of the best things about BSF is that, if you live in the appropriate climate, consistent year-round supplies of larvae are possible.

 

I live in a sub-tropical environment.....arguably the best for BSF......and we've gotten larvae for all but a couple of weeks in the past year.

 

Our neighbour has moved house and we've inherited her two laying chickens.   The shock of their relocation was softened by a double handful of larvae this afternoon.

 

Gary

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Hi,

 

While feeding out the contents of the collection chamber on our BioPod yesterday, it occurred to me that we've actually had very few days since we re-established our BSF colony at our island home late in 2013.

 

The other interesting observation is the frequency with which the collection chamber contains larvae of other fly species.   Yesterday, for example, the chamber was about quarter full (a double handful) of small white maggots (probably common housefly).  

 

Our two chickens will eat fly larvae in preference to anything else......and they don't care what type the larvae are either.

 

Gary

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Hi Phri,

 

Yes.....and not before time.  BSF larvae have been touted as fish food for a long time but it appears that they require a fair bit of processing to be really useful.....like removal of the chitin (which is a valuable substance in itself) and reduction of the fat levels (another very useful by-product).

 

The article to which you linked talks about feeding BSF larvae on food wastes.....but, based on my experience (and advice from Dr Paul Olivier), using animal manure as the feedstock is a much better idea.....and there doesn't appear that there's much of a shortage of that.

 

Gary

craig1267 and phri like this

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Thanks Gary,

 

I wasn't aware of the work of Paul Olivier, guess I have to read up a bit, as I see direct application in RAS aquaculture. This in combination with proper dewatering techniques of solid organic waste.

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A very cheap way to build a self harvesting BSF collector.  I had never considered keeping the self-harvesting box inside the container.  I think it would work as long as it doesn't get wet.  If the container that holds the self harvested larvae gets wet, the bugs can crawl right out.

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Soldier flys are interesting but how would someone benifit from them if they wasn't raising livestock to feed them too?

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They seem to be an efficient way of getting rid of kitchen scraps and manure, Mike,

 

I thought people on this forum were mainly interested in BSF to feed them to livestock.That doesn't mean to say you have to only breed them for that.

 

Did you have anything else in mind?

 

Cheers.

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Can soldier fly larvae be used as fish bait? I wouldn't wanna hook them if they had problems staying on hook or native fish didn't wanna eat them. Regular magits from blow and house flys break down waste . Would it be better to feed waste to something like a pig first?

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Google Black Soldier flys Mike...

 

Search and read through all that data and I think you may find the answer s you are looking for.

 

Cheers

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Reading this thread made me have a light bulb moment. I went to the hardware store and bought two cheap plastic bins and set them under the wire on the quail cage.  I have maybe 15 quail in there now, so I want to see what happens as their droppings automatically fall into the bins.  I had started a colony earlier in the month in an unused bucket, so I transferred that colony into one of the bins.

 

I constructed a makeshift ramp out of PVC pipe which I cut in half long ways and sprayed with truck bed liner for traction.  This way as the bin fills up, it won't bury the entrance of the pvc pipe since it's cut out long ways. This goes through the bin and into a 2 inch PVC pipe which then lets out into a tall bucket.  I'm not sure if they are smart enough to crawl up that little ramp, since most of the ramps I've seen are very wide.  We'll see.

Edited by craig1267 (see edit history)
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