ande

Holistic Management – a critical review

8 posts in this topic

Hi

An interresting read on holistic management from SLU, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences & Chalmers – Centre for Organic Food & Farming & Chalmers

Holistic Management a critical review of Allan Savory’s grazing method

https://www.slu.se/globalassets/ew/org/centrb/epok/dokument/holisticmanagement_review.pdf

Enjoy

 

 

vkn and Toga like this

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Hi Ande,

Coincidental timing indeed.

I recently graduated a government sponsored 2 year holistic management course, based on Savory's system.

I managed to get the local dairy farmer let me use a 'poor quality' hill side paddock for my course and exams.
He was extremely amicable allowing me to plan to grazing of this plot, in all aspects of herd numbers, frequency and duration of grazing time.

In 18 months I have documented excellent increases in; biomass production of grasses, overall ground coverage from 63% to 96%, from 1 dung beetle species to 5, grasshoppers, spiders, insects, birds... not to mention that the cattle forage more evenly, plants regrow with vigor even now during our winter... and the list goes on.

Great read for anyone on the land.
Thanks for sharing.

Cheers
Joe

GaryD likes this

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4 hours ago, ande said:

Hi

An interresting read on holistic management from SLU, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences & Chalmers – Centre for Organic Food & Farming & Chalmers

Holistic Management a critical review of Allan Savory’s grazing method

https://www.slu.se/globalassets/ew/org/centrb/epok/dokument/holisticmanagement_review.pdf

Enjoy

 

 

Yes, very interesting Ande.. Not yet finished reading but it looks like Savory holistic techniques are almost similar to what these scientists have been doing in the name of Silvopasture at CEFS (The Center for Environmental Farming) www.cefs.ncsu.eduthe intentional mixture of trees and pasture, integrating Agriculture and Forestry.  What do you think are the differences?

ande likes this

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Hi

I think the prinicipals behind "Silvopasture" are much the same, but more spesifically aimed at managing pasture on, the NC floodplains, from reading your link.

cheers

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Posted (edited)

8 hours ago, Toga said:

Ow, here are some site monitor reports from last year.

Cheers
Joe

Unit 3 Site Monitoring Report.pdf

Some nice landscape pictures there, Togaji.. All I could find were a few blank templates.  Could you briefly say what were your inferences from your report?  It would help.

Edited by vkn (see edit history)

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Hi VKN,

The reports are filled out, you need to zoom in.

Essentially, over the 2 year period the paddock improved dramatically, not only in stock carrying capacity but in green biomass production, insect species, fungi, water retention, soil coverage. Surface soil movement has been halted, the hillside is regenerating not just regrowing grass.

My neighbor says the paddock is now 75% more productive then before I began the course.

Thats what all food production is about, working with nature to increase fertility and productivity.

Cheers
Joe

vkn likes this

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7 hours ago, Toga said:

Hi VKN,

The reports are filled out, you need to zoom in.

Essentially, over the 2 year period the paddock improved dramatically, not only in stock carrying capacity but in green biomass production, insect species, fungi, water retention, soil coverage. Surface soil movement has been halted, the hillside is regenerating not just regrowing grass.

My neighbor says the paddock is now 75% more productive then before I began the course.

Thats what all food production is about, working with nature to increase fertility and productivity.

Cheers
Joe

Thanks Joe.  I was being careless.. just didn't zoom in to find those blue crosses.  Reading through to understand more of it.

Thanks for the highlights of your interesting work.  Very true.. I could relate that to our own old farm and working with nature - cows, goats, hens, rabbits, quails, etc. where animals roam free-ranging.   Dad was focusing on planting trees mainly for shade and timber.  Later they became coconut, banana, guava, and cocoa groves as far back I can remember.

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