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Found 5 results

  1. I've decided to trade in urban farming (including Aquaponics) for raising ducks and expanding my garden and having an orchard in the country. Not giving up my day job, just commuting longer by 10 minutes. Anyway, I'll be selling my Aquaponic grow beds and hydroton - look for it in the appropriate section. Especially interested in Muscovy ducks. Also want to raise quail. -Jeff (aka Pyrana)
  2. Hello APN! What a phenomenal wealth of experience and information there is to be found on this site. I am completely impressed and, well, pond puns notwithstanding, feel completely underwater with all there is to explore and learn! I am in the process of designing an approx. 1/3 acre small-city site located in the Sacramento, California, area. I'm slowly converting it from a bunch of lawn, paving, and garden beds surrounded by pea gravel to something much more integrated, locale-appropriate and productive. I'm working off my rusty PDC-learnings from about 8 years ago, mostly doing it alone while the spouse works overseas… and it's very slow going and prone to large bouts of indecision (and postponement as I'm also a caretaker for a teenager and an elder parent). I've been reluctant to get into AP - I don't have the time or resources for merely an expensive hobby. I'm aiming toward bolstering a system that doesn't require pricey or eventually-hard-to-obtain external inputs (so, raising freshwater fish on feed made from ocean fish, for example, is going to be a hard sell as would be high-maintenance filtration/pumping systems with costly, finicky, parts … or what have you). But I'm more than willing to accept that I don't have all the facts! I've seen reference here and there to "low-energy input" systems, and this micro-ponics category seems really right up my alley. I'm in the process of preparing to raise Coturnix quail, have a teeny vermicomposting system (and a regular compost pile), am going to have a mealworm farm shortly … and since water is EVERYTHING (esp. where we don't have it, like CA), am gearing up to harvest water on site in the landscape and in tank/pond catchments - so that's what has me turning to the AP community for ways to "stack" water's functions. But, too, an ultimate goal is to build soil - my garden beds seem to have been stripped of much of their nutrient value by the previous owner while the rest of the property has grown lawn and roses <eye-roll>. I don't have a horse in any of the AP races that seem to exist - but I am aware that I'm in a position to take advantage of the learning curve that's been scaled by so many before me (so, thank you!). I'm exploring AP in general, iAVs (and am reading Gary's manual online - Gary, you're an inspiration!), vermiponics (I never knew there was such a thing), etc. etc. Can anyone suggest, then, a good way to start small, with something sized so that failure is a learning experience and NOT a break-the-bank situation? Raising guppies in a 10-gal tank, feeding extras to quail and using changed-water for a basil plant? Growing duckweed (for compost or quail?) and a few mosquito-fish in a kiddie pool? An indoor system that requires heat (ie. for guppies) and light (for a plant) or one outdoors with locally adapted species all the way? Given my speed (ha!) I'm aiming to be ready for quail in early fall (incl. cages & tractor (they'll be raised on wire with access to "field trips"), incubator/brooder, etc) and will start with commercially available feed with the intention of gradually producing more on-site. Everything will have to support everything else... ok, this is book length and you're a trooper if you made it all the way to the bottom! Thanks for reading and creating a great community!
  3. HI all, Just thought I would post a a little build I did today. Material cost about $100 USD and took me about 7 hours with a trip to the lumber store to get a couple things I forgot. Next up the backyard ap system, with wicking beds as the main stay. Enjoy, Clint
  4. Here is a recipe from a New Orleans cook for quail. While processing and cleaning quail, I keep a container with ice in it and put the quail meat in there. I cut out the backbones, and separate the legs and breasts into separate pieces. You do as you wish, but I suggest keeping them on ice. When done, I put the birds in the fridge for at least overnight. When you take them out, save the water. It will have a little bit of reddish tint to it, plus it will have a slight infusion of quail meat in it, like a small stock. Save this. In a pot of your choice, make what we call the Trinity here in New Orleans. It involves chopped up onions, garlic and celery Or bell pepper. When it doubt of how much, use a lot It cooks down. Sautee with butter and some olive oil and a little salt and pepper. You can also add some cayenne/red pepper here. Be careful, a little of this goes a long way. When you cook these down, take the water that had the quail in it and dump it in the pot. Turn this to low to keep it warm and put a lid on the pot so you don't let all the water steam off. You need this to make a gravy when you mix the roux in. Make a dark roux. A roux is the most important part of this, so if you are new to making them, you might need some practice, but generally it takes more patience than skill. It involves equal parts flour and some kind of fat. You'll notice that the fat choice will slightly change the taste of the roux, but the flour will give it a generally nutty kind of flavor. Oil is a generally sound choice because it can get hot and won't burn. You can use oil and mix in some bacon fat, or even some butter. Be sure to use equal parts of each, like a cup of oil and a cup of flour. Translate that to metric if you need. You can make a roux on the stove, in the oven or in the microwave. Google it for instructions in other ways, but I'll explain the process of using a stainless steel pot or a cast iron pot. It gets very hot, so you must have a metal spoon, or better yet, a metal whisk. Put the heat on medium high at first and start stirring to get it going. It looks like condensed milk at first, froths up after a bit, then smooths out. Turn the heat to low at this point. You have to stir constantly, especially making an effort to make sure you get any part of the roux in the corners. It takes about 45 minutes or so to make a dark roux. It should look a little reddish dark after a while, then start to darken more. You'll notice the roux slowly darkening as you stir. Be careful not to stop stirring for too long, especially later on in the process or else it will burn since the heat is coming from the bottom. If you burn it, throw it out and start over because the burnt part will ruin the entire dish and overtake the flavor. When you get it dark looking, you'll want to turn off the heat and remove the pot from the heat. This thing will be so freaking hot, so be careful. You don't want it to cool off completely, but if you let it cool down just for a little while, it will be easier to pour into the other pot with the trinity and stock you added. You can't stop stirring even if you remove it from the heat, because oil will retain heat for quite a while and keep cooking and will still burn the bottom if you don't stir. Next, SLOWLY dump the roux into the other pot. Do a little at a time because the roux when hitting the warm water will cause something close to a steam explosion. Once you do this, you'll truly understand how hot the roux is. Keep putting little parts of roux in until you have it all. The steam that comes out of the pot is hot, so be careful. When you have it all in, start mixing everything up. It will start to look like a unmixed brown gravy. Now, there are two ways you can do the next part: You can add the quail meat into the pot with the roux/gravy, or you can put the quail meat in a slow cooker and cook for hours. I do both methods depending on how I'm feeling. I suggest you throw in some other meat like Tasso, Andouille sausage, or some smoked sausage. Add some additional salt or garlic salt, and add in some bay leaf and some parsley. This basic formula works with any game bird meat. If you use the slow cooker and cook this for 4-6 hours, the meat will fall right off the bone. The gravy will embody the taste of the seasoning and meat combination and will taste so awesome that you'll just want to eat the gravy with a spoon and leave the meat! You can serve this as it, or on top of rice. I personally don't like rice, but traditionally this is served on white rice. I sort of think that sucks, so I break from tradition and I like wild rice if I can get it. My wife is from Minnesota and we pick up wild rice from there when we visit. You can also within the last hour or so, add in chopped okra, and even slices of lemon. Right now is when our citrus trees harvest, and a few slices of lemon give this a different taste. Another option is to add in some red wine. Experiment! That's what makes cooking fun. Craig
  5. Hi everyone here at APHQ! What an awesome site! My names Shannon and I'm a Nurse from Adelaide. I live with my housemate on a little block of land and we have turned it into a zoo of animals. We keep quinea pigs, finches, budgies, diamond doves, cockatiels, stick insects, silkworms, goldfish (and other coldwater fish) king quails, Jap quails, bobwhite quail, muscovy ducks, 30 odd chickens a rooster and 5 cats. Our initial aim was to breed and sell the babies of our adults to make some spare income while I was studying (we even planned to open a petshop, however this looks to be a long term goal). Currently we sell the babies from our "breeders" to local petstores/fodder stores and at the local monthly auction or privately. We also have a massive vege garden and we grow with the seasons, selling excess veges on the road side and to friends at work etc. We've found that some things sell better than others, like our beautiful free range eggs! Currently we are into the Jap quails in a big way! What had originally started as a gift of 2 dozen fertile Japanese quail eggs for Christmas from my housemate has turned into 4 incubators running (constantly hatching eggs) We kept 7 females that hatched (by mistake as we had originally planned to keep all females, however we sold females thinking they were males as we had our sexing method a little mixed up!) So anyways we started with the 7 hens we had left and ordered different eggs from interstate. After 6 weeks growing we had 14 hens from the 36 eggs we ordered. Great! our next step was to source some males from another dealer so we went to our local fodder store and purchased another 9 females and 6 males from a different fodder store. This gave us a total of 30 hens and 6 roos. On average this gave us 30 eggs a day or 210 eggs a week. We set eggs every Friday (sometimes Saturday) and have a continual line of Quail chicks from day old- 7 weeks. We keep all Females (this is for another side project) and sell our excess males every month at Auction. We also eat a few ourselves along with veges from the garden and have a whole meal completely home grown. We sell fertile eggs, trios and quartets online to help cover feed occasionally. But as they don't eat a lot the money we get from the males at auction usually covers the feed for the next month until we are able to sell the next batch of excess males. At current we have a lot of females so our feed bill is going a little higher but we hope to start selling quail eggs at a local farmers market when laying is in full swing, probably around Spring. As the days are getting shorter our girls are slowing down their laying. We're in the process of adding mini solar garden lamps in the pens and seeing if this will create enough artificial light to prolong the laying season throughout Autumn and Winter. I will keep you all posted! If anyone has any questions, ideas, hints, experience etc please feel free to contact me! Cheers! Shannon