Joe

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About Joe

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  • Location
    Texas

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  • Interests
    Shrimp and salads
  1. Thank you Ravnis good info. I built a small greenhouse a few weeks ago and have had hell. On cloudy days no problem temps stay reasonable but the next day it is 110+ in the green house and everything is wilting. I raise the sides on sunny days and this helps. This greenhouse is a trial to see how it works and the second night it was up a huge rain took it down like nothing. I have learned a ton and it has only been a few weeks. as far as the roof top system I just need protection every once in awhile from the cold. the shade cloth is so that the plants do not wilt in the heat. I do not understand what the differences would be from having this system on the ground with the same shade cloth over it verses on top of the roof. I am not worried about the heat as this system is separated from my fish and the sump is underground to help cool it off. My water temps this last summer were hovering around 80. One question is how high off of the plants should the shade cloth be? Talking about summer time. I know not to close to the plants and I am not trying to keep heat in just need to help with the wilting.
  2. I was given a challenge a few years back to find out why the Rosenburgii has such problems with stocking densities and survival rate. I wish I could say that electrolysis was the answer to our problem but it seems like it is not the hormones, it is an aggression issue which we have sensed figured out several ways to raise the stocking levels. Back to the electrolysis. When I was a kid we had a salt water pool that made chlorine from splitting the salt. I was amazed and hooked 4 life just watching the bubbles come from the electrodes. I made several dry cells that ran off NH4 which takes much less voltage than water to split . I think 4 or 5 times less voltage. Very cool stuff. since then I have been making and playing with dry cells and electrolysis. This should be a cool topic Thank you for starting this thread
  3. I am about to build a garden on top of my building or at least that is the thought. I have plenty of room to do this system on the ground but I am wanting to try and keep the heat out of my breeder room during the hot months here in Texas. I have been playing with a new way to harvest and replant my system by having each tube removable from the side of the building so that I can set it on a table and harvest and then replant. I have a small version indoors that has been working pretty good. I will get a few pictures up later to show the roof and the trial setup. The building has a metal frame and doesn't have a problem with the weight as this system is more like a NFT and doesn't hold much water in the tubes so the weight is low per tube. I am going to start with 64 - 20' tubes that are 2.5" X 4" each will hold 30 plants each. For a total of 1920. I am going to add a shade cloth 7' over the roof and this is where I need help. We are lucky to freeze once every 2 or 3 years but it does happen so I am also planning on using a plastic cover for the few days it gets cold. The roof top will have full sun the whole day and I am growing greens and they do not like the full sun when it is hot. What information do I need to look for when buying plastic and shade cloth? What tricks do you have for temp control? I am more concerned about longevity than looks. Joe
  4. Toga we have been playing with electrolysis to remove hormones from the rosenburgii tanks in several trials to find away to decrease aggression and increase stocking densities. The funny thing was that the electrolysis seems to remove NH4 at a good rate as well as create chlorine but this is easily delt with by a mixing tank. I can talk more about this but I do not want to hijack anyone's thread. I agree that the bio load is what gets smelly.
  5. @Cecil I have raised tilapia indoors and find the smells go up when O2 goes down. I ran a biofloc this summer that had 75 fish in 55 gallon tank with nothing other than a sieve to remove biomass to dry and feed back to the fish. It was a very interesting way to grow tilapia. No filters, no mbbr just a sieve. It worked very well but it stunk. I had to be very constant on the carbon input to keep ammonia down with no mbbr. I will not do that one indoors again until I build another barn. I do not understand the water changes. Why do you change the water out? I only change water out when sterilizing a system to restart? What type of mechanical filters do you use? Joe
  6. Here are a few pics from this week. I will have to find a camera to show more these where taking by My daughter Thanks for the welcome
  7. Hello all, I am not much of an internet person but I love gardening and raising shrimp and fish. I am a hunter and try to supply most of our food from our land. I have been playing with organic hydro and really love the simplicity of the systems. Hope to get some great conversations going. Joe