DC Farms

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About DC Farms

  • Rank
    Advanced Member

More Information

  • Biography
    DC Farms is a commercial producer of Channel Catfish, and a variety of organic produce.
  • Interests
    Aquaponics

Profile Information

  • Location
    Williston, S.C.

Recent Profile Visitors

1436 profile views
  1. Hi guys, I know it's been a while, good to see all of you still here and plugging along. I just saw this video of a guy punching a Roo, was wondering if anyone else has an opinion on this. Peta wants the guy fired, some say he is a hero for saving his dog, is it wrong that I just find it funny as heck? I mean seriously, the roo looks at the guy after the punch like, "WTH, Dude? Did you really just punch me?" Opinions?
  2. I worry about that "limited upkeep" part. In SE Texas, your weather is my weather three days later. Now how much greens and veggies are you wanting to grow? If done properly with some of these systems YOU can do two to three crops per year in your area. I do think you could do a powerhouse on Tomatoes and Tomatillo's in the summer. Leafy greens from Feb to May and Sept to December I have no experience with shrimp or crawdads, so I am limited in what I can tell you on the aquaculture side.
  3. Hoe.... Not Ho hahahahahaa
  4. Note: I have never poked my nose into the iAVs discussions, I do however believe there is nothing gained by hiding posts or locking topics. In my opinion, censorship from a site such as this informs old and new members that only certain opinions are valid and acceptable. Remember, without mutation, iAVs would have never evolved from AP and AP would have never evolved from aquaculture and hydroponics. While I applaud Mark and Gary for their interest in something new and unproven, I do not particularly like the idea of iAVs. That is my opinion, and I stay out of those discussions for just that reason. I also feel that the nay-sayers should be respectful and stay out of those conversations if they have nothing to add to further the topic. JMHO
  5. Welcome to APN. A hoe never produce great fish!
  6. Here's a two pronged answer. 1. The best system is the system that works best for what you are willing to put your time into. 2. That depends on what you want to grow. I know, this sounds mean and avoiding, the truth is, you may never know what the best system is for you or your budget. You have to consider all of your variables. Cost vs. Time required vs. Climate vs. Attention vs. Dedication vs. Available area vs.............................You see my point.
  7. There are many methods, some acceptable and some not so much. Research Black water barrels, Wet haybales, bucket heaters, solar hose heaters..........
  8. As with everything else AP, you have to work for it.
  9. Would I just be better off attaching a greenhouse to my barn? That would be a lot of money for a beginner I think. Consider a hoop house instead of a full green house, some 3/4 pvc, 6 mil plastic, a couple of box fans and you should be off and running on that idea.
  10. My first system was also 300 gallons. I successfully matured 32 hybrid bluegill in that tank. Through the whole process of learning, I killed off 18 of my fish. I began by cycling that system for 8 weeks total, fought off two major algae blooms and finally got the system to produce active nitrification using the "humaponic" (human urine) system. After adding a mechanical filter system, I added 50 3-5" hybrid bluegill. Over the first year, I was able to harvest tomatoes, lettuce, kale and collards in the system. I was unsuccessful at my attempt to grow cucumber and squash in that system however. My second system included a 750 gallon tank with six 24' grow beds. My problem there was overstocking (300 channel catfish), limited filtration and poor design by making a square tank to hold catfish. (Catfish tend to hide in folded liners and die.) After some advice from Gary and Kellan, I changed to a 3300 gallon round tank, added mechanical and bio filters and have been able to catch up this year with massive production of fish, broccoli. cauliflower, and lettuce, After a little time off (heat above 90 degrees), I intend to put Kale, Collard, Broccoli, Cauliflower and Chard into the system for my fall/winter crops.
  11. There's a new answer for me.
  12. Ksmith, Welcome to APN. When starting my system, I too investigated different species availability and success rates. Being in South Carolina, I have access to several varieties of sunfish. I currently run a 4600 gallon system using channel catfish, hybrid bream, bluegill and one crappie. I have found that all of these do very well on commercial feeds with the exception of the crappie. While she will feed occasionally on commercial feed, I have to supplement with live fathead minnows (1 dozen per week, large) I find that this would not be an economically sound investment if I add more crappie to the system. On tilapia, since there are multiple licenses and regulations on raising and selling tilapia, along with the market being really flooded with them, I find them useless to raise unless you set your system up as a brooding system and sell fry commercially. JMO
  13. You can, they are already here. $$$$$$$$$$$$$
  14. Mike, From research, BSF's are natural predators to regular flys. Very common around here, and I attempt to keep them populated just to deal with the fly accumulation on the farm. Dogs, chickens, fish, compost bins, and now (our newest addition) goats, all attract flys and something has to deal with them.
  15. I recently went through this with a batch of Bluegill. I found that while I was doing water changes, I was neglecting to thoroughly clean my filters. I use a series of lava rock, pea gravel, packed sand and filter media. I was cleaning everything, however, the lava rock requires a lot of attention to clean the holes and crevices. This left solids in the filter and this was not showing as a contaminate in any water tests. Once I took the time to really deep clean the filtration system, no more dead fish.