edmolina

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  1. Cecil liked a post in a topic by edmolina in what is best way to cut holes in styrofoam?   
    I too used a hole saw, and with a 1 3/4" bit, the 2"pots are very snug and I have to force them in.
  2. bigdaddy liked a post in a topic by edmolina in Bad Advice on Facebook   
    LOL - well this is a regular love fest, ain't it... I'll bring the wine and after a few glasses will quickly declare my love for everybody.
  3. crsublette liked a post in a topic by edmolina in Eddie's Greenhouse Build   
    Looks like the broccoli is going to make it, and hopefully this is it for the arctic blasts. Through 03/01, low had been -4F, and the GH low hit 15F. Since then, the low has been -1F and the GH low has been 26F. Probably just starting to reap the benefits of the longer daylight hours.
  4. edmolina liked a post in a topic by yahoo2 in It's the beekeepers dream.   
    Hi Joe,
    No, its not a Pandora's box, its just a different management tool, there are benefits and disadvantages to every choice that we make.
     
     
    Commercial style hives are designed to be transported and to easily harvest the maximum amount of honey in a season as well as being used as a pollinator for commercial crops. Perhaps the plastic issue with the flow-comb will be more than offset by not opening the hive 6-7 times in 12 weeks.
     
    Top bar and warre hives are more about trying to replicate nature, heavier insulation, a more compact hive space, less honey taken, roof spaces to control moisture, bees make fresh wax for every new comb, less control of colony structure, less opening of the hive.
    you will find that what the bees harvest will have a large bearing on the hive population. slow growing plants in a healthy varied landscape have a lot of stored nutrients, bees on this diet live longer and have more healthy babies. Where the land is a monoculture or fast growing plants nutrition is lower, they will struggle to maintain the bee population even though they may be producing lots of honey.
     
    The big issue for the future of bees is building resistance to viruses, diseases, mites etc. The only way this will happen is through natural selection and evolution, sure, a lot of bee colonies will die along the way. If the the population of bees is large and varied enough and the organic/small scale beekeepers keep recolonizing with the survivors there could be a healthy resistant population of breeders in 7 generations of queens. On the other hand If the backyard beekeepers are persuaded to stop keeping bees because of abuse and vitriol from others and over-regulation from the industry bodies, then the bee population will collapse. there is not enough genetic variation in the commercial bee population and the wild bees will only interbreed with the colonies in their close surrounding area. A rapid collapse in the bee population leads to a collapse of the plants that they pollinate, it would be a long slow road back for regions that dont have good numbers of native bees and wasps to step in and take the bees place.
  5. TheDictator liked a post in a topic by edmolina in Why Aquaponics?   
    Different strokes for different folks I guess. I love soil farming and composting, and have found my AP/Hydroponics ventures to be much more labor intensive and challenging. Don't do any tilling, mulch heavily so very few weeds in my beds, and the chickens help with composting and garden bed prep/cleaning.
  6. edmolina liked a post in a topic by GaryD in My Permaculture Design Course   
    Thanks Ed.  I'm enjoying this particular learning journey and I'll certainly share what I know wherever there's a need.
     
    Gary
  7. edmolina liked a post in a topic by Cecil in The Evolution of a Permaculture Micro-Farm   
    Sounds interesting Gary! Keep us posted.
    Should we call you Dr. Donaldson soon? :-)
  8. edmolina liked a post in a topic by GaryD in The Evolution of a Permaculture Micro-Farm   
    Hi,
     
    In the coming weeks and months, I'm going to transition our home on Macleay Island to a Permaculture micro-farm.
     
    I'm currently studying a Permaculture Design Certificate course (online) with Geoff Lawton…..a prominent Australian Permaculture teacher.
     
    Successful completion of the program requires that participants submit a design for assessment.  Having completed the course, I'm then deemed to be qualified to work as a consultant…..and to teach Permaculture.
     
    I'll use what I know currently…..and what I learn on the PDC course…..to design my own backyard farm.
     
    I'll also be incorporating Microponics (the integration of fish, plants and micro-livestock) into the design.  Microponics is Permaculture in miniature…..intensive backyard food production - with an appropriate technology twist.
     
    Gary
  9. edmolina liked a post in a topic by GaryD in Organic Certification for Commercial Aquaponics   
    Hi,
     
     
    Things "organic" are probably in better shape in Oz than the US….but that will only be the case until large "multinational" agribiz operations decide to use it for marketing purposes. 
     
    The key issue is that there's no automatic connection between "organic" and "sustainability."  There's so much hype around everything these days.
     
    Within the past week or so, there's a food contamination drama involving frozen berries from China.  Why are we doing buying berries from China anyway?  How are the interests of ordinary citizens being served by these trade agreements?  Who buys these products when all of the local producers of everything have gone broke….and all of the people who worked for them are unemployed?
     
    I've always thought that one of the best growing products was mushroom compost…..but, in recent days, I've become aware that most mushroom producers are licensed to use some very nasty insecticides and fungicides……and the residues of those products are in the mushroom compost.
     
    The only food producer that I really trust is me……and that only extends to limits of my knowledge.
     
    Gary
  10. TheDictator liked a post in a topic by edmolina in Why Aquaponics?   
    Different strokes for different folks I guess. I love soil farming and composting, and have found my AP/Hydroponics ventures to be much more labor intensive and challenging. Don't do any tilling, mulch heavily so very few weeds in my beds, and the chickens help with composting and garden bed prep/cleaning.
  11. edmolina liked a post in a topic by velacreations in Hugelkultur - Anyone try it?   
    I used a similar approach to our water battery terraces, which are basically retaining walls on contour, with a swale on the uphill side, and back-filled with branches, organic matter and soil against the rock wall.  We got the pigs to do the majority of the leveling, and the chickens to spread the organic matter.  So far, it's been really good.  It is completely green right now, coming out of winter, and it hasn't had a drop of water since October.  I have all sorts of trees, shrubs, plants, and vines planted, everything is doing well.  It produced a good bit of food last year and even through the winter, can't wait to see what it will do this year.  If I had the ability, I'd do my whole property like this!
     
    http://velacreations.com/howto/forest-garden-howto/
  12. edmolina liked a post in a topic by ande in It's the beekeepers dream.   
    Hi
    Just read a nice intro(norwegian news) on this revolutionary new Australian beehive system
    quote: Flowâ„¢ Hive - "It's Literally Honey on Tap Directly From Your Beehive!"
    from here: http://www.honeyflow.com/
     
    Genius IMO check it out
     
    cheers
     
  13. Xpim liked a post in a topic by edmolina in MY base Idea coming up:   
    How about some DE? I don't think that it'll hurt anything but insects (as long as it's not breathed in).
  14. Xpim liked a post in a topic by edmolina in MY base Idea coming up:   
    Yep. It also scratches the outer skins of insects and they dehydrate. Works super fast on soft skinned insects such as aphids.
  15. Jarrad liked a post in a topic by edmolina in Hi from Canberra, Australia - pic heavy   
    Welcome Jarrad. Look forward to reading of your progress - keep us posted!
  16. edmolina liked a post in a topic by kellenw in Rethinking the fish part of the equation   
    You've gotta get yourself an electric fillet knife, man. Makes life a lot easier. It's one of the best fish related investments you'll make.
  17. edmolina liked a post in a topic by bcotton in Rethinking the fish part of the equation   
    For sunfish and catfish i use electric for the whole process.. It cuts through the rib cage under the side fin and then follow the spine to the tail. 
     
    Then you can trim off the rib cage and take the skin off wihile wasting less meat.
     
    This process doesnt work so well for me with tilapia because they have some small bones around the spine hat seem to always end up in my fillet.. I am still trying to figure that one out. There's got to be an easy technique that the fish industry uses because i dont find bones in their tilapia fillets
  18. Cecil liked a post in a topic by edmolina in Rethinking the fish part of the equation   
    Experience makes all the difference. I've never gone fishing (gasp), and this is the first time that I processed fish. The thought of filleting 200 in a day sounds torturous to me...
  19. TheDictator liked a post in a topic by edmolina in IAVS Brainstorming: ideas that might improve on the design   
    Filter sock:
     
    Pros - inexpensive, effective, minor to no modifications required
    Cons - may be a pain to regularly maintain, may clog and either release suddenly flooding system with waste, or causing a leak/overflow
  20. kellenw liked a post in a topic by edmolina in Adequate Bio-Filtration with an emphasis on sand beds.   
    Gents, some of you really do seem to enjoy a game of ping pong (table tennis). Some of these interactions are reminiscent of watching republicans and democrats debate. Fortunately, in this case we don't have to be stuck with any given side; those who wish will put these systems into practice and results over time will show what's what.
  21. kellenw liked a post in a topic by edmolina in Adequate Bio-Filtration with an emphasis on sand beds.   
    Gents, some of you really do seem to enjoy a game of ping pong (table tennis). Some of these interactions are reminiscent of watching republicans and democrats debate. Fortunately, in this case we don't have to be stuck with any given side; those who wish will put these systems into practice and results over time will show what's what.
  22. kellenw liked a post in a topic by edmolina in Adequate Bio-Filtration with an emphasis on sand beds.   
    Gents, some of you really do seem to enjoy a game of ping pong (table tennis). Some of these interactions are reminiscent of watching republicans and democrats debate. Fortunately, in this case we don't have to be stuck with any given side; those who wish will put these systems into practice and results over time will show what's what.
  23. kellenw liked a post in a topic by edmolina in Adequate Bio-Filtration with an emphasis on sand beds.   
    Gents, some of you really do seem to enjoy a game of ping pong (table tennis). Some of these interactions are reminiscent of watching republicans and democrats debate. Fortunately, in this case we don't have to be stuck with any given side; those who wish will put these systems into practice and results over time will show what's what.
  24. edmolina liked a post in a topic by SamBurton in Rooster With A Death Wish   
    I've got a Wyandotte rooster who has crossed the line.  When I went out to feed the chickens this morning he attacked me.  That's the third time in the last two weeks.  Here in the land of baseball, it's three strikes and you're out. So the little man will be processed on Wednesday along with our three Pekin drakes.  I can't have aggressive animals. Sure, it doesn't hurt me, but sometimes we have children come to the farm and they always want to pet the animals. Mr. rooster can't be allowed to injure or terrify a child. Perhaps it sounds calloused, but it's our policy around here.
     
    He would be a year old in May, so we'll cook him low and slow and he should be quite tasty.
     
    Any of you have aggressive animal policies?
  25. edmolina liked a post in a topic by early in Adequate Bio-Filtration with an emphasis on sand beds.   
    Or you can buy sponge filters from the company that provides financial support to this site and save money compared to those others too, http://alliedaqua.com/system-components/pumps-filtration/filtration.html